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THE PENNIMAN MEMORIAL LIBRARY OF EDUCATION 

OF BROWN UNIVERSITY 

ESTABLISHED BY JAMES HOSMER PENNIMAN, YALE 188. 

IN MEMORY OF HIS PARENTS 

MARIA DAVIS HOSMER 

JAMES LANMAN PENNIMAN, YALE 1853 

GRANDSON OFCHIRON PENNIMAN, BROWN 1791 

GREAT-GRANDSON OF ELI AS PENNIMAN, BROWN 1774 



THIS BOOK WAS PRESENTED 



BY 



^^iy^\^^ 



THE LIBRARY OF 
BROWN UNIVERSITY 




THIS BOOK WAS PRESENTED 



BY 



^^^^ 



The University of Kansas 

LAWRENCE 



ANNUAL CATALOG 



KANSAS STATE PRINTING PLANT 

IMRI ZUMWALT, State Printer 

TOPEKA. 1919 

7-5419 



BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 

Educational, Charitable, and Correctional Institutions. 



MEMBERS. 

ARTHUR CAPPER, Governor, 

Ex officio Chairman. 

E. W. HOCH. C. W. GREEN. WILBUR N. MASON. 

JAS. A. KIMBALL, Business Manager. 



■ 



SECTION I. 

General Information. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



Academic Year, 1918-'19. 

December 28, Saturday — Close of Christmas recess. 

December 30 — Beginning of second quarter; enrollment in classes. 

December 31, Tuesday — Beginning of class work in all departments. 

March 19, Wednesday — Second quarter closes, March 20 t® 24, inclusive — Spring 

recess. 
March 25, Tuesday — Beginning of third quarter; enrollment in classes. 
May 30 — Memorial Day — Holiday. 
June 13, Friday — Third quarter closes. 
June 15, Sunday, 8 p. m. — Baccalaureate sermon. 
June 17, Tuesday, 10 a.m. — Commencement exercises. 
June 17, Tuesday — Beginning of Summer Session. 

Academic Year, 1919-'20. 

September 15, 16, 17, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday — Entrance examinations and reg- 
istration. 

September 16, 17, Tuesday, Wednesday — Enrollment in classes. 

September 18 — Beginning of class work in all departments. 

September 19, Friday — General assembly and annual address, at 10 a. m. 

November 17, Monday — Beginning of second half-semester. 

November 26 to 29, Wednesday to Saturday, inclusive — Thanksgiving recess, begin- 
ning Wednesday noon. 

Christmas Recess — Saturday, December 20, to Saturday, January 3, inclusive. 

January 26 to 30, Monday to Friday, inclusive — Semester examinations. 

February 2, Monday — Beginning of second semester; enrollment in classes. 

February 3, Tuesday — Beginning of class work in all departments. 

February 12, Tuesday, Lincoln's birthday — Legal holiday. 

February 22, Friday, Washington's birthday — Legal holiday. 

April 2 to 5, Friday to Monday, inclusive — Easter recess. 

April 6, Tuesday — Beginning of second half-semester. 

May 31 to June 4, Monday to Friday, inclusive — Semester examinations. 

June 6, Sunday, 8 p. m. — Baccalaureate sermon. 

June 8, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. — Alumni address. 

June 8, Tuesday, 8 p. m. — Chancellor's reception. 

June 9, Wednesday, 10 a. m. — Commencement exercises. 

June 10, Thursday — Beginning of Summer Session. 



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CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



1855 — (December). A university provided for in the first constitution of Kansas terri- 
tory, at Topeka. 
1857 — (June). State University at Lawrence provided for by free-state legislature, 
Topeka. 

(September). Seminary of learning provided for in Lecompton constitution. 
1858 — (April). System of public instruction, including a university department, provided 

for in Leavenworth constitution. 
1859 — (July). State University provided for as at present, in Wyandotte constitution, 

now the constitution of the state of Kansas. 
1861 — Congress set apart and reserved for the use and support of a State University 

seventy-two sections of land. 
1863 — Lawrence selected as location for the University of Kansas. 
1864 — The University organized by the legislature. 
1865 — March 21, first meeting of the Board of Regents. 

1866 — July 19, Regents elected the first Faculty of the University, consisting of Elial Jay 
Rice, A. M., David Hamilton Robinson, A. M., and Francis Huntington 
Snow, A. M. 

North College erected. 

September 12, first session of the University opened at North College. 
1870 — Department of Engineering organized. 
1872 — Fraser Hall erected and occupied. 
1876 — Normal Department established. 
1877 — Department of Music organized. 
1878— Department of Law organized. 
1883 — Medical Hall (old Chemistry Building) erected. 
1885 — Department of Pharmacy established. 

Normal Department discontinued. 
1886 — Snow Hall erected. 
1891 — The University reorganized; the Preparatory Department discontinued and the 

Schools of Arts, Engineering, Law, Fine Arts, and Pharmacy established. 
1894 — Spooner Library erected. 

Chancellor's residence erected. 
1895 — Blake Hall erected. 
1896 — The Graduate School established. 
1899 — The Fowler Shops erected. 

The School of Medicine established. 
1900 — Chemistry and Pharmacy Building erected. 
1902 — Dyche Museum of Natural History erected. 
1903 — Summer Session established. 
1904 — The name of the School of Arts changed to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Green Hall erected. 
1905 — Full four-year course in medicine established. 

Eleanor Taylor Bell Memorial Hospital erected. 
1906 — Robinson Auditorium-Gymnasium erected. 

Clinical Laboratory erected. 

Nurses' Training School established. 
1907 — Marvin Hall erected. 
1908 — Haworth Hall erected. 

Power Plant and Laboratories erected. 
1909 — The School of Education established. 

The Division of University Extension established. 
1911 — First wing of Administration Building erected. 

State Hospital erected at Rosedale. 

Clay-working Laboratory erected. 
1915 — Dispensary at Rosedale erected. 

Oread Training School Building erected. 
1916 — Vivarium erected. 
1918 — West wing and portion of central section Administration building erected. 

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OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION. 



THE UNIVERSITY. 

Frank Strong, Ph. D., Chancellor. 

Room 103, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 10 a.m. to 12 m. and 2 to 4 p.m. 

Wm. L. Burdick, Ph D., Vice President. 

Room 206, Green Hall. 

Hours: First semester, 11:30 a. m., to 12:30 p. m. ; second semester, 9 to 10:30 a. m. 

George O. Foster, A. B., Registrar. 

Room 109, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 12 m. and 2 to 5 p. m. 

John M. Shea, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Room 201, Repair Shop. 

Alberta L. Corbin, Ph. D., Adviser of Women. 

Room 114, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. 

John J. Wheeler, A. M., University Marshal. 

Property Room, Robinson Gymnasium. 
Hours: 10:30 to 12 m. 

THE SCHOOLS. 

Frank W. Blackmar, Ph. D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

Room 206, Administration Building. 
Hours: 8 to 11 a. m. 

Olin Templin, 1 A. M., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Room 102, Fraser Hall. 
Hours : 9 to 12 a. m. 

D. L. Patterson, 2 B. S., Assistant Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

Room 106, Fraser Hall. 

Perley F. Walker, 3 M. M. E., Dean of the School of Engineering. 

Room 112, Marvin Hall. 
Hours : 9 a.m. to 12 m. 

George C. Shaad, E. E., Acting Dean of the School of Engineering. 

Room 112, Marvin Hall. 
Hours: 9 to 10 a. m. 

James W. Green, A. M., Dean of the School of Law. 

Room 101, Green Hall. 
Hours: 9 to 10 a. m. 

Harold L. Butler, A. B., Dean of the School of Fine Arts. 

1406 Tennessee street. 

Hours: 9 a. m. to 12 m. and 2 to 5 p. m. 

1. Absent for war work, first quarter. 

2. Acting dean during first half year. 

3. Absent for military service, first and second quarters. 



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Officers of Administration. 

Carl A. Preyer, Mus. D., Associate Dean of the School of Fine Arts. 

1406 Tennessee street. 
Hours : 

Lucius E. Sayre, Ph. M., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Room 215, Chemistry and Pharmacy Building.' 
Hours: 10 to 11 a. m. 

Samuel J. Crumbine, M. D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Tuesdays at Lawrence. 
Wednesdays at Rosedale. 

Mervin T. Sudler, Ph. D., Associate Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Tuesdays and Saturdays at Lawrence. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at Rosedale. 

Frederick J. Kelly, Ph. D., Dean of the School of Education. 

Room 119, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 11 a.m. to 12 m. and 3 to 4 p.m. 

THE DIVISIONS. 

Frederick J. Kelly, Ph. D., Director of Summer Session. 

Room 119, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 11 a.m. to 12 m. and 3 to 4 p.m. 

Frederick R. Hamilton, 3 Ph. D., Director of University Extension. 

Room 117, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 12 m. and 2 to 5 p. m. 

Harold G. Ingham, A. B., Acting Director of University Extension. 

Room 117, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 12 m. and 2 to 5 p. m. 

William 0. Hamilton, A. B., Director of Athletics.* 

Room 203, Robinson Gymnasium. 
Hours: 10 a.m. to 12 m. 

, Director of Libraries. 



• Room , Spooner Library. 

Hours : 

Frank Strong, Ph. p., ex officio Director of Museums. 

Room 103, Fraser Hall. 

Hours: 10 a. m. to 12 m. and 2 to 4 p. m. 

Arthur T. Walker, Ph. D., Director of University Publications. 

Room 202. 

Hours: 11 :30 a. m. 

— , Director of State Service Work. 



Room 
Hours : 



-, Director of University Surveys. 



Room 
Hours : 



Arthur T. Walker, Ph. D., Director of Vocations. 



Room 202. 

Hours: 11 :30 a. m. 



* This division is in process of reorganization. 
3. Absent for war work. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION, 



Frank Strong, Chancellor of the University and President of the Facul- 



A B Yale, 1884; A.M. Yale, 1893; Ph.D. Yale, 1897; LL. D. Oregon, Baker, Kan- 
sas Agricultural College, 1909. Lecturer in History, Yale, 1897-99; President University 
of Oregon, 1899-1902. Present position, 1902. 

William Livesey Burdick, Vice president of the University and Pro- 
fessor of law. 

A. B. Weslevan, 1882; A.M. Weslevan, 1885; Ph.D. Chattanooga, 1884; LL. B. Yale, 
1898; Professor of Law, Kansas, 1898-1916. Present position, 1916. 



PROFESSORS. 

Ephraim Miller, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

A. B. Allegheny, 1855; A.M. Allegheny, 1858; Ph.D. Allegheny, 1895. Professor of 
Mathematics and Astronomy, Kansas, 1874-1910. 

James Woods Green, Dean of the School of Law and Professor of Law. 

A. B. Williams, 1866; A.M. Williams, 1886. Present position, 1878. 

Edcar Henry Summerfield Bailey,* Professor of Chemistry and Metal- 
lurgy and Director of Chemical Laboratories. 

Ph. B. Yale, 1873; Ph.D. Illinois Wesleyan, 1883. Instructor in Chemistry, Yale, 
1873-74; Instructor in Chemistry, Lehigh, 1874-83. Present position, 1883. 

Alexander Martin Wilcox, Professor of Greek Language and Litera- 
ture. 

A. B. Yale, 1877; Ph.D. Yale, 1880. Assistant in Greek, Wesleyan, 1880-83. Pres- 
ent position, 1885. 

Lucius Elmer Sayre, Dean of the School of Pharmacy, Professor of 
Pharmacy and Materia Medica. 

Ph. G. Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1866; Ph. M. Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy, 1896; B. S. Michigan, 1897. Instructor, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 
1880-85. Present position, 1885. 

Frank Wilson Blackmar, Dean of the Graduate School and Professor 
of Sociology. 

Ph. B. University of the Pacific, 1881; A.M. University of the Pacific, 1884; Ph.D. 
Johns Hopkins, 1889. Professor of Mathematics, University of the Pacific, 1882 ; Pro- 
fessor of History and Sociology, Kansas, 1889-99; Dean of the Graduate School, 1897; 
Professor of Sociology and Economics, Kansas, 1899-1911. Present position, 1897 — 

Charles Graham Dunlap, Professor of English Literature. 

A. B. Ohio Wesleyan, 1883; A.M. Ohio Wesleyan, 1899; Litt. D. Princeton, 1892. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature, Kansas, 1887; Associate Professor of English 
Literature, Kansas, 1889. Present position, 1890. 

Carl Adolph Preyer, Associate Dean of the School of Fine Arts and 
Professor of Piano and Composition. 

Mus. D. Baker, 1909. Professor of Piano, Counterpoint, Canon and Fugue, Kansas, 
1892-1915. Present position, 1915. 

* Absent on leave, second and third quarters. 

(9) 



10 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Olin Templin, 1 Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and 
Professor of Philosophy. 

A. B. Kansas, 1886; A.M. Kansas, 1890. Instructor in Mathematics, Kansas, 1884; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Kansas, 1886; Associate Professor of Philosophy, 
Kansas, 1890; Professor of Philosophy, Kansas, 1892. Present position, 1903. 

Edwin Mortimer Hopkins, Professor of Rhetoric and English Language. 

A. B. Princeton, 1888; A.M. Princeton, 1890; Ph.D. Princeton, 1894. Assistant 
Professor of English, Kansas, 1889; Associate Professor of English, Kansas, 1892. Pres- 
ent position, 1893. 

Frank Heywood Hodder, Professor of American History and Political 
Science. 

Ph. M. Michigan, 1883. Instructor in History and Economics, Cornell, 1885-89; As- 
sistant Professor of Economics, 1889-90; Associate Professor of American History, 1891-93. 
Present position, 1893. 

Erasmus Haworth, Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

B. S. Kansas, 1881; M.S. Kansas, 1884; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, 1888. Associate 
Professor of Geology, Kansas, 1892. Present position, 1894. 

Arthur Tappan Walker, Professor of Latin Language and Literature, 
and Director of University Publications. 

A. B. New York, 1887; A.M. Vanderbilt, 1892; Ph.D. Chicago, 1898. Professor of 
Latin and Greek, Juniata, 1888-90; Professor of Latin and Greek, Emory and Henry, 
1892-93; Instructor in Latin, Chicago, 1894-97. Present position, 1897. 

William Chase Stevens, Professor of Botany. 

B. S. Kansas, 1885; M.S. Kansas, 1893. Assistant in Botany, 1889-92; Associate 
Professor of Botany, 1892-99. , Present position, 1899. 

Arvin Solomon Olin, Professor of Education. 

A. B. Ottawa, 1892; A.M. Kansas, 1894; LL. D. Ottawa, 1915. Instructor in Peda- 
gogy, Kansas, 1893; Associate Professor of Pedagogy, Kansas, 1894; Professor of Educa- 
tion, Kansas, 1899; Dean of the Summer Session, Kansas, 1913-15; Acting Dean of the 
School of Education, Kansas, 1913-14; Dean of the School of Education, Kansas, 1914-15. 
Present position, 1899. 

William Alexander Griffith, 2 Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Academie Julien. Professor of Drawing and Painting, Washburn, 1893-94; Instructor 
in Drawing, Washington, 1895-97. Present position, 1899. 

Eugenie Galloo, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. 

Academie de Paris, Brevet, 1881, Sorbonne, 1884; B. L. Michigan, 1892; A.M. Kan- 
sas, 1895. Assistant Professor in French, 1892 ; Associate Professor in French and 
Spanish, 1899-1900. Present position, 1900. 

Charles Sanford Skilton, Professor of Organ, Theory of Music and 
Music History. 

A. B. Yale, 1889. Dean of the School of Fine Arts, 1903-15. Present position, 1903. 

Ida Henrietta Hyde, Professor of Physiology. 

A. B. Cornel], 1891; Ph.D. Heidelberg, 1896. Associate Professor of Physiology, 
Kansas, 1899. Present position, 1905. 

William Hamilton Johnson, Professor of Education. 

A. B. Kansas, 1885; A.M. Kansas, 1891. Professor of History and Pedagogy, Em- 
poria State Normal, 1893-96. Present position, 1903. 

James Naismith^ Professor of Physical Education. 

A. B. McGill, 1887; M. D. Gross Medical, 1898; M. P. E. Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
College, 1910. Instructor, Springfield Y. M. C. A. College, 1891; Associate Professor of 
Physical Education, Kansas, 1898. Present position, 1908. 

Samuel John Hunter, Professor of Entomology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1893; A.M. Kansas, 1893. Assistant Professor of Entomology, Kansas, 
1896; Associate Professor of Entomology, Kansas, 1899. Present position, 1906. 

1. Absent for war work, first quarter. 

2. Absent on leave. 

3. Absent for war work. 



Officers of Instruction. 11 

William Edward Higgins, 4 Professor of Law. 

B. S. Kansas, 1888; LL. B. Kansas, 1894. Assistant Professor of Law, 1894; As- 
sociate Professor of Law, 1900. Present position, 1906. 

Perley F. Walker, 5 Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of 
Industrial Engineering. 

B. M. E. Maine, 1896; M. E. Maine, 1900; M. M. E. Cornell, 1901. Instructor in 
Mechanical Engineering, Maine, 1896-1900; Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Maine, 
1902-05; Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Kansas, 1905-13. Present position, 1913. 

Mervin Tubman Sudler, Associate Dean of the School of Medicine, and 
Professor of Surgery. 

B. S. Maryland Agricultural, 1894; M.S. 1897; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, 1899; M. D. 
College of Physi-cians and Surgeons, Baltimore, 1901. Instructor in Anatomy, Johns 
Hopkins, 1900-02 ; Instructor in Anatomy and Surgery, Cornell, 1902-03 ; Dean of the 
Scientific Department, School of Medicine, Kansas, 1905-11. Present position, 1911. 

L. D. Havenhill, Professor of Pharmacy. 

Ph. C. Michigan, 1893; Ph. M. Michigan, 1894; B. S. Kansas, 1903. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy, 1899-1906; Associate Professor of Pharmacy, 1906-08. Present 
position, 1908. 

Frederick Edward Kester, Professor of Physics. 

M. E. Ohio, 1895; A.M. Cornell, 1899; Ph.D. Cornell, 1905. Assistant in Physics, 
Ohio, 1895-98; . Instructor in Physics, Ohio, 1899-1901; Assistant Professor of Physics, 
Ohio, 1901-03, 1905-07; Associate Professor of Physics, Ohio, 1907-09. Present posi- 
tion, 1909. 

George Carl Shaad, Acting Dean of the School of Engineering and Pro- 
fessor of Electrical Engineering. 

B. S. Pennsylvania State, 1900; E. E. Pennsylvania State, 1905. Instructor in Elec- 
trical Engineering, Wisconsin, 1902-04; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
Wisconsin, 1904-06; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, 1906-07 ; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1907-09. Present position, 1909. 

Samuel Jay Crumbine, Dean of the School of Medicine, and Professor 
of Preventive Medicine. 

M. D. Cincinnati, 1889. Present position, 1905. 

Hamilton Perkins Cady, Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B. Kansas, 1897; Ph.D. Kansas, 1903. Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 1889-95; 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1895-1911. Present position, 1911. 

Don Carlos Guffey, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B. S. Missouri, 1899; M.S. Kansas, 1908 ; M. D. Pennsylvania, 1905. Present posi- 
tion, 1914. 

Lindsey Stephen Milne, r Professor of Medicine. 

M. B., Ch. B., M. D. Edinburgh, 1908. Present position, 1912. 

Herbert Allan Rice, Professor of Mechanics and Structural Engineer- 
ing. 

C E. Ohio, 1897. Instructor in Civil Engineering, Lehigh, 1902-05; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering, Kansas, 1905-06; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
1906-13. Present position, 1913. 

Bennet Mills Allen, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph. B. De Pauw, 1898; Ph.D. Chicago, 1903. Instructor in Zoology, Wisconsin, 
1903-08; Assistant Professor of Zoology, Wisconsin, 1908-13. Present position, 1913. 

Edmund Howard Hollands, Professor of Philosophy. 

Ph. B. Cornell, 1899; A.M. Cornell, 1901; Ph.D. Cornell, 1905. Instructor in Phi- 
losophy, Cornell, 1905-06; Instructor in Philosophy, Princeton, 1906-07; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Cornell, 1907-09; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Hamilton, 1909-10; 
Professor of Philosophy, Butler, 1910-13. Present position, 1913. 

4. Absent on leave. 

5. Absent for military service, first and second quarters. 

6. Absent for military service. 



12 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Henry Wilbur Humble, Professor of Law. 

A.M. Cornell, 1908; LL. B. Cincinnati, 1904; J. D. Chicago, 1915. Assistant in 
Economics, Cornell, 1907-08 ; Associate Professor of Law, Kansas, 1908-13. Present posi- 
tion, 1913. 

Edward Delahay Osborn, 7 Professor of Law. 

Present position, 1913. 

Goldwin Goldsmith, Professor of Architecture. 

Ph. B. Columbia, 1896. Present position, 1913. 

William Arch McKeever, Head of Department of Child Welfare. 

A.M. Kansas, 1898; Ph. M. Chciago, 1904; LL. D. Berea, 1917. Professor of 
Philosophy, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1900-13. Present position, 1913. 

Frank Burnett Dains, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph. B. Connecticut Wesleyan, 1890; M.S. Wesleyan, 1891; Ph.D. Chicago, 1898. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern, 1895-1901; Professor of Chemistry, 
Washburn, 1902-11; Associate Professor of Chemistry, Kansas, 1911-14. Present posi- 
tion, 1914. 

Clement Clarence Williams, Professor of Railway Engineering. 

B. S. Southern Iowa Normal, 1900; B. S. in C. E. Illinois, 1907; C. E. Colorado, 
1909. Instructor, Southern Iowa Normal, 1900-02 ; Instructor in Civil Engineering, 
Colorado, 1907-09; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Colorado, 1909-14. Present 
position, 1914. 

Elmer Franklin Engel, Professor of German. 

A. B. Kansas, 1892 ; A. M. Harvard, 1898. Assistant in German, Kansas, 1892 ; 
Assistant Professor of German, Kansas, 1896-1905; Associate Professor of German, Kan- 
sas, 1905. Present position, 1914. 

John Nicholas Van der Vries, 8 Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B. Hope, 1896; A.M. Hope, 1899; Ph.D. Clark, 1901. Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, Kansas, 1901-06; Associate Professor of Mathematics, Kansas, 1906-14. 
Present position, 1914. 

William Oliver Hamilton, Professor of Physical Education and Di- 
rector of Athletics. 

A. B. William Jewell, 1908. Physical Director, William Jewell, 1896; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education, Kansas, 1912. Present position, 1914. 

Arthur MacMurray, Professor of Public Speaking. 

A. B. Kansas, 1896; M. O. Ott School of Expression, 1904. Professor of Public 
Speaking, Iowa State College, 1908-14. Present position, 1914. 

Frederick Rutherford Hamilton, 9 Director University Extension Di- 
vision. 

Ph. B. Wisconsin, 1906. Present position, 1914. 

Elizabeth Cade Sprague, Professor of Home Economics. 

Graduate, Boston Normal School of Household Arts, 1898. Instructor in Home Eco- 
nomics, Lake Erie, 1900-01 ; Research Assistant, Illinois, 1901-05 ; Instructor in Home 
Economics, Chicago, 1905-13. Present position, 1914. 

Ralph Herman Major, 10 Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 

A. B. William Jewell, 1902; M. D. Johns Hopkins, 1910. Assistant in Medicine, 
1910-12; Instructor in Pathology, Stanford, 1912-14. Present position, 1914. 

William Bell Downing, Professor of Voice and Public School Music. 

Graduate, Drake, 1905; Professor of Voice, Highland Park, 1907-09; Instructor in 
Voice, Drake, 1909-13. Present position, 1914. • 

Herman Olcott, 1 * Professor of Physical Education. 

A. B. Yale, 1901. Present position, 1915. 

7. Absent for war work. 

8. Absent for war work. Resigned, January, 1919. 

9. Absent for war work. 

10. Absent for military service, first quarter. 

11. Absent for war work. 



Officers of Instruction. 13 

Raphael Dorman O'Leary, Professor of English. 

A. B. Kansas, 1893; A. B. Harvard, 1895. Assistant Professor of English, Kansas, 
1895-1906; Associate Professor of Rhetoric, 1906-15. Present position, 1915. 

Raymond Alfred Schwegler, Professor of Education. 

A. B. Brown, 1899; A.M. Ottawa, 1907. Associate Professor of Education, Kansas, 
1907-15. Present position, 1915. 

Arthur Jerome Boynton, Professor of Economics. 

A. B. Harvard, 1901; A.M. Columbia, 1902. Assistant Professor of Economics, 
1903-10; Associate Professor of Economics, Kansas, 1910-15. Present position, 1915. 

Charles Hamilton Ashton, Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B. Union, 1887; A.M. Harvard, 1893; Ph.D. Munich, 1909. Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Harvard, 1894-1903; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Kansas, 1903-10; Asso- 
ciate Professor of Mathematics, 1910-15. Present position, 1915. 

Arthur Clark Terrill, Professor of Mining and Ore Dressing. 

E. M. Colorado School of Mines, 1905; A.M. Columbia, 1914. Assistant Professor of 
Mining, Metallurgy and Geology, University of Oregon, 1906-07; Professor of Mining 
and Metallurgy, Oregon, 1907-08; Head of Mining Department and Professor of Metal- 
lurgy, University of Idaho, 1908-09; Assistant in Mine Surveying, Columbia University, 
Summer of 1914. Present position, 1915. 

Harold Lancaster Butler, Dean of the School of Fine Arts and Pro- 
fessor of Voice. 

A. B. Valparaiso, 1894; Graduate, School of Music, Valparaiso, 1895; LL. B. Val- 
paraiso, 1896; Graduate, Gottschalk Lyric School, Chicago, 1898. Instructor in Voice, 
Valparaiso, 1896-98; Director, School of Music, Valparaiso, 1890-1904; Director Vocal 
Department, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse, 1904-15. Present position, 1915. 

Arthur Nevin, Professor of Ensemble and Music Extension. 

Conductor of Chorus Work, McDowell Memorial Association. Present position, 1915. 

Harry Conrad Thurnau, Professor of Germanic Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

A. B. Michigan, 1899; A.M. Michigan, 1903; Ph.D. Michigan, 1909. Instructor in 
German, University of Michigan, 1905-12; Associate Professor of German, Oberlin College, 
1912-15. Present position, 1915. 

Frederick James Kelly, Dean of the School of Education, Director of 
the Summer Session and Professor of Education. 

A. B. Nebraska, 1902; Ph.D. Columbia, 1914. Director of the Training School, State 
Normal, Spearfish, S. Dak., 1908-12 ; Director of the Training School, State Normal, 
Emporia, Kan., 1914-15. Present position, 1915. 

David Leslie Patterson, 12 Professor of European History and Assistant 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

B. S. Pennsylvania State, 1895. Instructor in History, Wisconsin, 1905-08; Asso 
ciate Professor of History, Kansas, 1908-16; Acting Associate Professor of History, Wis 
consin, 1914-15. Present position, 1916. 

William Asbury Whitaker, 13 Professor of Metallurgy and Director of 
State Chemical Research. 

Ph. B. North Carolina, 1904; A.M. Columbia, 1905. Assistant in Chemistry, North 
Carolina, 1903-04; Instructor in Chemistry, City of New York, 1906-11; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Metallurgy, 1911-16. Present position, 1916. 

Leon Nelson Flint, Professor of Journalism. 

A. B. Kansas, 1897. Lecturer in Journalism, Kansas, 1906-09; Assistant Professor 
of Journalism, 1909-13; Associate Professor of Journalism, 1913-16. Present position, 
1916. 

Frederick Hubbard Sibley, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Director of Fowler Shops. 

Ph. B. Brown, 1898; M. E. Case, 1904. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, Case, 1907; Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Alabama, 1912; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mechical Engineering, Kansas, 1912-13; Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, 1913-16. Present position, 1916. 

12. Acting dean during first quarter. 

13. Absent on leave. Resigned, March, }9,19. 



14 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

George Ellett Coghill, Professor of Anatomy. 

A. B. Brown, 1896; M.S. New Mexico, 1899; Ph.D. Brown, 1902. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Biology, New Mexico, 1899-1901; Professor of Biology, Pacific, 1902-06; Pro 
feasor of Biology, Willamette, 1906-07; Professor of Zoology, Denison, 1907-13; Asso- 
ciate Professor of Anatomy, Kansas, 1913-16. Present position, 1916. 

Raymond Asa Kent, Professor of Education. 

A. B. Cornell College, 1903; A.M. Columbia, 1910; Ph.D. Columbia, 1916. Instructor 
in Mathematics, State Normal School, Winona, Minn., 1909-11; Principal University 
High School and Assistant Professor of Education, Minnesota, 1914-16. Present posi- 
tion, 1916. 

Ole Olufson Stoland, Professor of Physiology. 

A. B. South Dakota, 1905; M.S. Chicago, 1911; Ph.D. Chicago, 1913. Instructor in 
Biology, South Dakota, 1906-11; Assistant in Physiology, Chicago, 1911-13; Professor 
of Physiology, South Dakota, 1913-16. Present position, 1916. 

Walter Samuel Hunter, 14 Professor of Psychology. 

A. B. Texas, 1910; Ph.D. Chicago, 1912. Instructor in Philosophy, Texas, 1912-14; 
Adjunct Professor of Psychology, Texas, 1914-16. Present position, 1916. 

William Mathews Hekking, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

B. P. Syracuse, 1908; Art Students' League, New York; Academie Julien ; Academie 
Colorossi. Instructor in Drawing, Syracuse, 1911-12; Director, School of Fine and Ap- 
plied Arts, James Millikin, 1912-15; Associate in Drawing, Department of Architecture, 
Illinois, 1915-16. Present position, 1916. 

Frank Estes Kendrie, Professor of Violin and Orchestral Ensemble. 

A. B. Bowdoin, 1910; A.M. Harvard, 1912. Professor of Violin, Valparaiso, 1914-17. 
Present position, 1917. 

Clarence Addison Dykstra, 1 ^ Professor of Political Science. 

A. B. Iowa, 1903. Instructor in History and Political Science, Ohio State, 1908-09; 
Associate Professor of History, Kansas, 1909-17. Present position, 1917. 

George Jussen Hood, Professor of Engineering Drawing. 

B. S. Kansas, 1902. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Draw ng, Kansas, 1902-11 ; 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Drawing, 1914-17. Present position, 1917. 

Carl Ferdinand Nelson, Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 

A. B. Wisconsin, 1908; A.M. Wisconsin, 1910; Ph.D. Wisconsin, 1912. Instructor 
in Chemistry, Iowa, 1908-11; Instructor in Chemistry, Illinois, 1912; Associate Professor 
of Physiological Chemistry, Kansas, 1913-17. Present position, 1917. 

Arthur Leslie Owen, Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

A. B. Vermont, 1906; A.M. Illinois, 1909. Assistant Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages, Kansas, 1910; Instructor in Romance Languages, Chicago, 1913; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages, Kansas, 1914-18. Present position, 1918. 

Noble Pierce Sherwood, Professor of Bacteriology. 

B. S. Kansas, 1905; A.M. Kansas, 1911. Instructor in Bacteriology, Kansas, 
1910-13; Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, Kansas, 1913-16; Associate Professor of 
Bacteriology, Kansas, 1916-18. Present position, 1918. 

William V. Cahill, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Art Students' League, New York. Director and Instructor, School for Illustration 
and Painting, Los Angeles. .Present position, 1918. 

Jacob Block, Professor of Genito-urinary Surgery. 

M. D. Medical College of Ohio, 1879. Present position, 1905. 

S. S. Glasscock, Professor of Psychiatry. 

M. D. Rush, 1887. Present position, 1905. 

Joseph S. Sawtell,* Professor of Otorhinolaryngology. 

M. D. College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, 1886. Present position, 1905. 



* Died, April, 1919. 

14. Absent for war work, first quarter. 

15. Absent on leave. 



Officers of Instruction. 15 

Isadore Julius Wolf, Professor of Internal Medicine. 

M. D. Munich, 1887. Present position, 1905. 

Franklin E. Murphy, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

M. D. Pennsylvania, 1893. Present position, 1907. 

Lyman L. Uhls, Professor of Psychiatry. 

M. D. Rush, 1884. Present position, 1911. 

Andrew L. Skoog, Professor of Neurology. 

M. D. Northwestern, 1902. Present position, 1911. 

Edward James Curran, Professor of Ophthalmology. 

M. D. Harvard, 1908; D. Ophth. Oxon, 1910. Present position, 1913. 

Peter Thomas Bohan, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

M. D. Rush, 1900. Instructor in Internal Medicine, 1905. Present position, 1914. 

George M. Gray, 15 Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

M. D. Kansas City Medical, 1879; M. D. Bellvue, 1880. Present position, 1914. 

William L. McBride, 10 Professor of Dermatology. 

M. D Rush, 1901. Associate Professor of Dermatology, 1905-16. Present position 
1916. 

Richard L. Sutton, Professor of Dermatology. 

M. D. University Medical College, 1901; M. D. George Washington, 1904. Associate 
Professor of Dermatology, 1911-16. Present position, 1916. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS. 

Miles Wilson Sterling, Associate Professor of Greek. 

A. B. Kansas, 1883; A.M. Kansas, 1893. Assistant in Latin and Greek, Kansas, 
1883-85; Assistant in Greek, 1885; Assistant Professor of Greek, Kansas, 1896-190l'. 
Present position, 1901. 

Hannah Oliver, Associate Professor of Latin. 

A. B. Kansas, 1874; A.M. Kansas, 1888. Assistant Professor of Latin, 1890-1905. 
Present position, 1905. 

Selden Lincoln Whitcomb, Associate Professor of Comparative Litera- 
ture. 

A.M. Columbia, 1893; Litt. D. Grinnell, 1918. -Professor of English Literature 
Grinnell, 1895-1905. Present position, 1905. 

Martin Everett Rice, Associate Professor of Physics and Electrical 
Engineering. 

B. S. Kansas, 1891; M.S. Kansas, 1893. Instructor in Physics, Kansas, 1892-95- 
Assistant Professor of Physics, Kansas, 1895-1901. Present position, 1906. 

Louis Eugene Sisson, Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

A. B. Leland Stanford, 1904; A.M. Harvard, 1909. Instructor in Rhetoric 1904-05- 
Assistant Professor of Rhetoric, 1905-10. Present position, 1910. 

Alberta Linton Corbin, Adviser of Women and Associate Professor of 
German. 

A. B. Kansas, 1893; Ph.D. Yale, 1902. Assistant Professor of German, Kansas 
1902-11; Associate Professor of German, 1911-18. Present position, 1918. 

William Jacob Baumgartner, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1900; A.M. Kansas, 1901. Instructor of Zoology, Kansas 1904-05- 
Assistant Professor of Zoology, Kansas, 1905-13. Present position, 1913. 



15. Absent for military service. 

16. Absent for military service. 



16 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Henry Otto Kruse, Associate Professor of German. 

A. B. Kansas, 1894; A.M. Kansas, 1903. Instructor in German, Kansas, 1904-05; 
Assistant Professor of German, 1905-13. Present position, 1913. 

Clarence Cory Crawford, Associate Professor of European History. 

A. B. Kansas, 1903; A.M. Kansas, 1904; Ph.D. Wisconsin, 1906. Assistant in His- 
tory, Wisconsin, 1904-06; Instructor in History, Missouri, 1906-07; Assistant Professor 
of European History, Kansas, 1907-13. Present position, 1913. 

Earle Walter Murray, 17 Associate Professor of Latin. 

A. B. Kansas, 1904. Assistant Professor of Latin, Kansas, 1907-13. Present posi- 
tion, 1913. 

William Savage Johnson, Associate Professor of English Literature. 

A. B. Yale, 1900; Ph.D. Yale, 1905. Instructor, Yale, 1905-08; Assistant Professor 
of English Literature, Kansas, 1908-13. Present position, 1913. 

Victor E manual Helleberg, Associate Professor of Sociology, 

A. B. Yale, 1883; LL. B. Cincinnati, 1885. Instructor in Sociology, Chicago, 1908-10; 
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Kansas, 1910-13. Present position, 1913. 

Charles Arthur Haskins, 18 Associate Professor of Sanitary Engineer- 
ing. 

B. S. Kansas, 1910. Instructor of Civil Engineering, Kansas, 1911; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering, Kansas, 1912. Present position, 1913. 

George Otis Foster, Registrar. 

A. B. Kansas, 1901. Present position, 1899. 

Frederick Newton Raymond, Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

A. B. Kansas, 1896; A.M. Columbia, 1897. Assistant Professor of Rhetoric, Kansas, 
1901-14. Present position, 1914. 

Margaret Lynn, Associate Professor of English Literature. 

B. S. Tarkio, 1899; A.M. Nebraska, 1900. Assistant Professor of English Litera- 
ture, Kansas, 1901-14. Present position, 1914. 

Elise Neuen Schwander, Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1898; Ph.D. Yale, 1913. Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 
1905-14. Present position, 1914. 

Herman Camp Allen, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B. McPherson, 1904; A.M. Kansas, 1905; Ph.D. Cornell, 1912. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, 1910-14. Present position, 1914. 

William Watson Davis, 19 Associate Professor of American History. 

B. S. Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1903; M. S. Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1904; 
A.M. Columbia, 1906; Ph.D. Columbia, 1913. Lecturer in History, Columbia, 1908-09; 
Assistant Professor of American History, Kansas, 1910-14. Present position, 1914. 

William Coleman McNown, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B. S. Wisconsin, 1903. Instructor in Civil Engineering, Cornell, 1905-07; Professor 
of Civil Engineering, Earlham, 1907-09; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Kan- 
sas, 1913-14. Present position, 1914. 

Ulysses Grant Mitchell, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B. Kansas, 1906; A.M. Kansas, 1907; Ph.D. Princeton, 1910. Instructor in 
Mathematics, Kansas, 1906-08; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Kansas, 1910-15. 
Present position, 1915. 

Alfred Higgins Sluss, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B. S. in Mech. Eng. Illinois, 1901. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
1908-15. Present position, 1915. 

17. Absent on leave. 

18. Absent for military service. 

19. Absent for war work. 



Officers of Instruction. 17 

Floyd Carlton Dockeray, 20 Associate Professor of Psychology. 

A. B. Michigan, 1907; A.M. Michigan, 1909; Ph.D. Michigan, 1915. Assistant In- 
structor in Psychology, Michigan, 1908-09; Instructor in Psychology, Kansas, 1910-13; 
Assistant Professor, 1913-16. Present position, 1916. 

Hubert Wilbur Nutt, Associate Professor of Education, and Director 
of Oread Training School. 

Ph. B. Chicago, 1914; Dean of Education, Marion Normal, 1909-12; Dean of Edu- 
cation, Muncie Normal, 1913-14; Assistant Professor of Education, Kansas, 1914-16. 
Present position, 1916. 

Joseph Granger Brandt, Associate Professor of Greek. 

Ph. B. Lawrence College, 1903; Ph.D. Wisconsin, 1911. Instructor in Latin, Wis- 
consin, 1908-11; Carnegie Research Associate, American School of Classical Studies in 
Rome, 1911-12; Instructor in Latin, Wisconsin, 1912-13; Assistant Professor of Latin, 
Wisconsin, 1913-14; Assistant Professor of Latin and Greek, Wisconsin, 1914-15; As- 
sistant Professor of Greek, Kansas, 1915-16. Present position, 1916. 

Raymond Fridman Rice, Associate Professor of Law. 

A. B. Oberlin, 1905; LL. B. Kansas, 1908. Associate Professor of Law, Kansas, 
1913-15. Present position, 1916. 

Arthur E. Hertzler, Associate Professor of Surgery. 

M. D. Northwestern, 1894; Ph.D. Illinois Wesleyan, 1902. Present position, 1905. 

Herbert Barker Hungerford, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1911; A.M. Kansas, 1913; Ph.D. Cornell, 1918. Instructor in Ento- 
mology, Kansas, 1911-13; Assistant Professor of Entomology, Kansas, 1913-17. Present 
position, 1917. 

Ralph Emerson Carter, 21 Associate Professor of Education. 

Ph. B. Franklin, 1906; A.M. Chicago, 1911. Instructor in Education, Texas, 1912-13; 
Assistant Professor of Education, Kansas, 1913-17. Present position, 1917. 

Ellis Bagley Stouffer, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B., A.M. Drake, 1907; Ph.D. Illinois, 1911. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
Kansas, 1914-17. Present position, 1917. 

Blaine Free Moore, 22 Associate Professor of Political Science. 

A. B. Kansas, 1901; A.M. Illinois, 1908; Ph.D. Columbia, 1913. Division Superin- 
tendent and Member of the Provincial Council in the Philippine Islands, 1901-06; In- 
structor in Government, University of Michigan, 1909-10; Assistant Professor of Political 
Science. George Washington University, 1910-15; Lecturer in Political Science, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1913-14; Assistant Professor of Political Science, Kansas, 1915-17. 
Present position, 1917. 

Burton Lee Wolfe, Associate Professor of Mining. 

B. S. Kansas, 1903. Principal Weir School of Mines, 1912-17. Present position, 1917. 

Florence Brown Sherbon, Associate Professor of Home Nursing and 
Medical Adviser of Women. 

Ph. B., 1892; A.M., M. D., 1904, Iowa University. Present position, 1917. 

George Weatherworth Stratton, 23 Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B. Colorado, 1907; A.M. Ohio State, 1909; Ph.D. Ohio State, 1912. Instructor 
in Chemistry, Ohio State, 1909-12; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Kansas, 1912-13; 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Kansas, 1914-18. Present position, 1918. 

Francis Ellis Johnson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

A. B. Wisconsin, 1906; E. E. Wisconsin, 1909. Instructor in Electrical Engineering, 
Rice Institute, 1912-15; Instructor in Electrical Engineering, Kansas, 1915-16; Assistant 
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Kansas, 1916-18. Present position, 1918. 

20. Absent for war Avork. 

21. Absent for military service, first quarter. 

22. Absent for war work. 

23. Absent for military service, first and second quarters. 

2— K. U.— 5419. 



18 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Manuel Conrad Elmer, Associate Professor of Sociology. 

B. S. Northwestern College, 1911; A. M Illinois, 1912; Ph.D. Chicago, 1914. Pro- 
fessor of Economics and Sociology, Fargo College, 1914-16; Lecturer in Sociology, Minne- 
sota, Summer, 1916; Assistant Professor of Sociology, Kansas, 1916-18. Present posi- 
tion, 1918. 

Raymond Cecil Moore, Associate Professor of Geology and Paleontology, 
and State Geologist. 

A. B. Denison, 1913; Ph.D. Chicago, 1916. Assistant in Geology, Chicago, 1914-16; 
T nst ru ctor in Geology, Chicago, 1916; Assistant Professor of Geology and Paleontology, 
Kansas, 1916-18. Present position, 1918. 

William McGlashan Duffus, Associate Professor of Economics. 

A. B. Stanford, 1910; A.M. Wisconsin, 1913. Assistant Professor of Economics, 
Kansas, 1915-18. Present position, 1918. 

Paul Vance Faragher, 24 Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B. Kansas, 1909; Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1913. Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry, Kansas, 1913-18. Present position, 1918. 

Alice Littlejohn Goetz, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

Graduate Sargent Normal School, 1902 ; Harvard Summer School of Physical Educa- 
tion, 1905; M. D. Howard University Medical, 1906. Associate Professor of Physical 
Education, Ohio, 1907-14; Associate Professor of Physical Education, Kansas, 1914-16; 
Associate Professor of Physical Education, University of Arizona, 1916-18; Director of 
Physical Training, Santa Barbara State Normal School, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Robert McEwen Schauffler, Associate Professor of Orthopedic Sur- 
gery. 

A. B. Williams, 1893; M. D. Columbia, 1896. Associate Professor of Surgery, Kan- 
sas, 1905-11. Present position, 1917. 

William Frederick Kuhn, Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

A.M. Wittenberg, 1878; M. D. Jefferson Medical, 1885. Present position, 1905. 

William Kirk Trimble, Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology. 

M. D. Kansas City Medical, 1900. Present position, 1905. 

Orval James Cunningham, Associate Professor of Surgery. 

M. D. Rush, 1904. Present position, 1915. 

Robert Douglas Irland, 2 " 1 Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

M. D. Kansas, 1909. Instructor in Obstetrics, Kansas, 1911-15; Assistant Professor 
of Obstetrics, 1915-17. Present position, 1917. 

John James Sippy,* Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine. 

M. D. St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1899. Present position, 1918. 

Thomas Dyer Tuttle, Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine. 

M. D. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1892. Present posi- 
tion, May, 1919. 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

Charles Morgan Sterling, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy. 

A. B. Kansas, 1897. Present position, 1901. 

Edwin Fiske Stimpson, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B. S. Kansas, 1890. Instructor in Physics, 1901-05. Present position, 1905. 

Frank Everett Jones, 20 Superintendent of Fowler Shops and Assistant 
Professor of Pattern Making and Founding. 

Instructor in Carpentry and Pattern Making, 1903-06; Assistant Professor of Pattern 
Making and Foundry, 1906-15. Present position, 1915. 



* Resigned, April, 1919. 

24. Absent on leave. 

25. Absent for military service. 

26. Absent for military service. 



Officers of Instruction. 19 

James Edward Todd, Assistant Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

A. B. Oberlin, 1867: M. A. Oberlin, 1870. Professor of Natural Sciences, Tabor, 
1871-92; Adjunct Professor of Natural Sciences, Beloit, 1881-83; Professor of Geology 
and Mineralogy, South Dakota, 1892-1903. Present position, 1907. 

Harriett Greissinger, Assistant Professor of Piano. 

Mus. B. Kansas, 1895. Instructor in Piano, 1902-07. Present position, 1907. 

Albert Morey Sturtevant, Assistant Professor of German. 

A. B. Harvard, 1899; A.M. Harvard, 1901; Ph.D. Harvard, 1905. Instructor in 
German, 1908-10. Present position, 1918. 

George Nathaniel Watson, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, in charge 
of Drug Laboratory. 

A. B. Michigan, 1904; B. S. Michigan, 1908; Ph. C. Michigan, 1908. Instructor in 
Pharmacy, 1909-10. Present position, 1910. 

Lulu Gardner, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

A. B. Kansas, 1905. Instructor in Rhetoric, Kansas, 1905-09. Present position, 1910. 

Clifford Caudy Young, 27 Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and Director 
of State Water and Sewage Laboratory. 

A. B. Kansas, 1910. Present position, 1910. 

Herbert E. Jordan, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B. McMaster, 1900; A.M. McMaster, 1901; Ph.D. Chicago, 1904. Instructor in 
Mathematics, Brandon College, 1904-06; Instructor in Mathematics and Physics, Michigan 
College of Mines, 1906-11. Present position, 1911. 

William Rees B. Robertson. Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1906; A.M. Kansas, 1907; Ph.D. Harvard, 1915. Instructor in 
Zoology, Kansas, 1907-09. Present position, 1912. 

Theodore Townsend Smith, 28 Assistant Professor of Physics. 

A. B. Harvard, 1907; A.M. Harvard, 1908; Ph.D. Harvard, 1916. Instructor in 
Physics, Kansas, 1910-13. Present position, 1913. 

Charles Homer Talbot, 29 Head of Municipal Reference Bureau. 

A. B. Wisconsin, 1910. Present position, 1913. 

John Diller Garver, 30 Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B. S. Kansas, 1910. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, Kansas, 1912-14. Present 
position, 1914. 

Frank Logan Brown, Assistant Professor of Mechanics. 

B. S. in C. E. Colorado, 1911. Instructor in Civil Engineering, Colorado, 1912-13. 
Present position, 1913. 

Walter Sterritt Long, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, in charge of 
Food Laboratory. 

A. B. Ohio Wesleyan, 1905; A.M. Ohio Wesleyan, 1908. Assistant in Chemistry, 
1911-12. Present position, 1913. 

Nadine Nowlin, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1903; A.M. Kansas, 1903. Instructor in Zoology, 1906-13. Present 
position, 1913. 

Anna Louise Sweeney, Assistant Professor of Piano. 

Mus. B. Kansas, 1906. Instructor, Kansas, 1909. Present position, 1914. 

Harry Ashton Roberts, 31 Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B. S. Illinois, 1902. Present position, 1914. 



27. Absent for military service. Resigned, March, 1919. 

28. Absent for war work, first quarter. 

29. Resigned, January, 1919. 

30. Absent for military service. Died, February, 1919. 

31. Absent for military service, first and second quarters. 



20 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Joseph Edward Welker,* Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

B. S. Clarkson School of Technology, 1913; LI. of C. E. Harvard Graduate School of 
Applied Sciences, 1914. Assistant Professor of Sanitary Engineering, Kansas, 1914-17; 
Chemist of Water and Sewage Laboratory, Kansas, 1917-18. Present position, 1918. 

Grace Miriam Charles, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

A. B. Oberlin, 1900; A.M. Chicago, 1905; Ph.D. Chicago, 1910. Instructor in 
Botany, Kansas, 1911-15. Present position, 1915. 

Jacob Oscar Jones, Assistant Professor of Hydraulics. 

B. S. Kansas, 1912; M. C. E. Cornell, 1915. Instructor in Civil Engineering, Kansas, 
1912-14. Present position, 1915. 

Harold Greene Ingham, Acting Director of University Extension and 
Secretary of Correspondence Study Department. 

A. B. Milton, 1909. Instructor in Business Administration, Wisconsin, 1913-15. 
Present position, 1915. 

Josephine May Burnham, Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph. B. University of Chicago, 1901; Ph.D. Yale, 1910. Instructor in English, 
Wellesley College, 1902-12; Associate Professor of English, Wellesley College, 1912. Pres- 
ent position, 1915. 

Frank Edgar Melvin, Assistant Professor of Modern European History. 

A. B. Kansas, 1906; A.M. Kansas, 1909; Ph.D. Pennsylvania, 1913. Assistant in 
History, Illinois, 1909-12; Lecturer in History, Pennsylvania, 1913-15; Assistant Profes- 
sor of 'Modern European History, Cornell, 1915-16. Present position, 1916. 

William Lewis Eikenberry, Assistant Professor of the Teaching of 
Biological Sciences. 

B. S. Michigan, 1894. Instructor in Science, Mt. Morris College, 1894-1901; Instruc- 
tor in Botany, University High School, Chicago, 1909-16; Assistant in Natural Science, 
Chicago, 1909-16. Present position, 1916. 

Frederick William Bruckmiller, 32 Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

. A. B. Kansas, 1912; A.M. Kansas, 1915. Instructor in Chemistry, Kansas, 1912-13; 
Chemist of State Water Survey, Kansas, 1913-16. Present position, 1916. 

Rose Ruth Morgan, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

A. B. Kansas, 1894; A.M. Kansas, 1905. Instructor in Rhetoric, 1910-16. Present 
position, 1916. 

Amida Stanton, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1904; A. M. Kansas, 1910. Instructor in Romance Languages, 1910-16. 
Present position, 1916. 

Helen Gaile Jones, 33 Assistant Professor of German. 

Ph. B. De Pauw, 1900; A.M. Kansas, 1914. Instructor in German, Kansas, 1910-16. 
Present position, 1916. 

John Jefferson Wheeler, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, and 
University Marshal. 

A. B. Indiana, 1905; A.M. Kansas, 1913. Professor of Mathematics, Friends, 
1905-11; Instructor in Mathematics, Kansas, 1911-16. Present position, 1916. 

Leon B. McCarty, 34 Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

A. B. Ohio State, 1910; A.M. Ohio State, 1911. Instructor in Rhetoric, Kansas, 
1912-16. Present position, 1916. 

Solomon Lefschetz, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

M. E. Ecole Centrale, 1905; Ph.D. Clark, 1911. Instructor in Mathematics, Ne- 
braska, 1911-13; Instructor in Mathematics, Kansas, 1913-16. Present position, 1916. 

Richard Leonidas Grider, Assistant Professor of Mining. 

E. M. Colorado School of Mines, 1905. Instructor in Mining, University of Oregon, 
1909-10; Instructor in Mining, Kansas, 1915-16. Present position, 1916. 

* Absent for military service, first quarter. 

32. Absent on leave. 

33. Absent for war work. 

34. Absent for military service. 



Officers of Instruction. 21 

George Clark," 5 Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B. S. Illinois, 1916. Present position, 1916. 

Winthrop Perrin Haynes, 3,; Assistant Professor of Geology, Mineralogy, 
and Petrology. 

A. B. Harvard, 1910; A.M. Harvard, 1912; Ph.D. Harvard, 1914. Assistant in 
Geologv, Harvard, 1908-16; Instructor in Geology, Radcliffe, 1911-14; Instructor in 
Geology, Wellesley, 1914-16. Present position, 1916. 

John Ise, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Mus. B. Kansas, 1908; A. B. Kansas, 1910; LL. B. Kansas, 1911; A.M. Harvard, 
1912; Ph.D. Harvard, 1914. Assistant in Economics, Harvard, 1912-13; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics, Iowa State College, 1914-15; Associate Professor of Economics, Iowa 
State College, 1915-16. Present position, 1916. 

Samuel Orrick Rice, Director of Publicity and Assistant Professor of 
Journalism. 

Present position, 1916. 

May Gardner, 37 Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1897. Instructor in Romance Languages, Kansas, 1909-17. Present 
position, 1917. 

DlNSMORE Alter, 38 Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

B. S. Westminster College, 1909; M.S. University of Pittsburg, 1910; Ph.D. Cali- 
fornia, 1916. Instructor of Physics and Astronomy, 1911-12, Assistant Professor of 
Physics and Astronomy, 1912-13, and Adjunct Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Ala- 
bama, 1913-14; Instructor in Astronomy, California, 1914-17. Present position, 1917. 

Helen Maude Clarke, Assistant Professor in Correspondence Study. 

A. B. Kansas, 1903; A.M. Kansas, 1907; Ph.D. Cornell, 1910. Instructor in Corre- 
spondence Study, Kansas, 1910-17. Present position, 1917. 

Clarence B. Francisco, 39 Assistant Professor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

M. D. Kansas, 1907. Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery, Kansas, 1905-17. Present 
position, 1917. 

Donald Ray Black, 40 Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1914; M. D. Kansas, 1916. Interne, Bell Memorial Hospital. Present 
position, 1917. 

Clarence Estes, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S. in Chemical Engineering, Missouri, 1908; Chemical Engineer, Missouri, 1909; 
Instructor, Iowa, 1909-12. Analyst in Food Laboratory, 1914-17. Present position, 1917. 

John Robinson Frazier, Assistant Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Graduate Rhode Island School of Design, 1909. Instructor in Drawing, Rhode 
Island School of Design, 1909-12; Instructor in Drawing, Bradley Institute, 1912-17. 
Present position, 1917. 

Francis Montgomery Veatch, Assistant Professor of Sanitary Engin- 
eering. 

B. S. Kansas, 1914. Chemical Research Assistant, Kansas, 1914-16. Present posi- 
tion, 1917. 

George Hermann Derry, Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Graduate Stonyhurst College, England, 1902; Ph.D. Holy Cross, 1908. Assistant 
Professor of Romance Languages, Kansas, 1917-18. Present position, 1918. 

Maxwell Ferguson, Assistant Professor of Economics and Commerce. 

A. B. Harvard, 1908; A.M. Columbia, 1909; LL. B. Columbia, 1911. Instructor in 
Economics, Leipzig, Germany, 1911-12; Instructor in Economics, Hamilton, 1913; In- 
structor in Economics, Vassar, 1916-17. Present position, 1917. 

35. Absent for military service. 

36. Absent for military service. 

37. Absent for war work. 

38. Absent for military service, first quarter. 

39. Absent for military service. 

40. Absent for military service. 



22 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Grover Cleveland Loud, 41 Assistant Professor of Journalism. 

A. B. Harvard, 1912. Instructor in English, Dartmouth, 1913-18. Present position, 
1918. 

Felipe Molina,* Assistant Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

B. L. Nicaragua. Professor of Philosophy, Colegio de Senoritas, San Jose, Costa 
Rica, 1913; Professor of History, Colegio, Cartago, Costa Rica, 1914-15; Professor of 
English and History in the Institute Nacional, Alajuela, Costa Rica, 1916; Instructor in 
Romance Languages, Kansas, 1917-18. Present position, 1918. 

Ray Quincey Brewster, 42 Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B. Ottawa, 1914; A.M. Kansas, 1915. Assistant Instructor in Chemistry, 1915-17; 
Instructor in Chemistry, Kansas, 1917-18. Present position, 1918. 

Charles Hoyt Watson, Assistant Professor of the Teaching of Physical 
Sciences. 

A. B. Kansas, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Robert Georges Mahieu, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ecole Secondaire Notre-Dame, LaFleche (Sarthe) ; A. B. University of Paris, 1915. 
Instructor Ecole Secondaire, Notre Dame (St. Calais), 1913-15; Ecole Ste. Croix, Le 
Mans, 1915-16; Ecole St. Charles (Juris'y), 1916-18. Present position, 1918. 

LlTA Battey, Assistant Professor of the Teaching of English. 

A. B. Kansas, 1906; A.M. Kansas, 1914; A.M. Columbia, 1918. Present position, 
1918. 

Marion A. Bills, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

A. B. Michigan, 1908; Ph.D. Bryn Mawr, 1917. Instructor, Bryn Mawr, 1911-15; 
Research Assistant in Psychology, Michigan, 1916-17; Professor of Psvchologv, Oxford 
College, 1917-18. Present position, 1918. 

Herman Blaney Chubb, Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

A. B. George Washington, 1912; A.M. Columbia, 1913. Lecturer, George Washing- 
ton, 1916-17; Research Assistant, Library of Congress, 1913-17. Present position, 1918. 

Howard McKee Elsey, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B. Stanford, 1914; A. M, Stanford, 1915. Present position, 1918. 

Edgar Wertheim, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S. Northwestern, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Charles Eugene Johnson, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

A. B. Minnesota, 1906; A.M. Minnesota, 1907; Ph.D. Minnesota, 1912. Assistant 
in Zoology and Comparative Anatomy, Minnesota, 1907-12; Instructor, Minnesota, 
1912-18. Present position, 1918. 

Willard Augustus Burton, Assistant Professor of Sanitary Engi- 
neering. 

B. S. C. E. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

Pearl Emley-Elliott, Assistant Professor of Piano and Organ. 

Mus. B. Kansas, 1909; Mus. M. Kansas, 1913. Instructor in Piano and Organ, 
Kansas, 1913-18. Present position, 1918. 

Ward William Sullivan, Assistant Professor of History in University 
Extension Division. 

A. B. Illinois, 1911; A.M. Illinois, 1914. Professor of History, Kansas State Normal, 
1914-17. Present position, 1918. 

Elizabeth Campbell Meguiar, Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Certificate, University of Chicago, 1910. Instructor, State College of Pennsylvania, 
1910-13, University of Chicago, 1913 (Summer), University of Texas, 1914-17; In- 
structor in Home Economics, Kansas, 1917-18. Present position, 1918. 

John G. Hayden, 43 Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

B. S. Chicago, 1902 ; M. D. Rush, 1904. Present position, 1909. 

* Resigned, March, 1919. 

41. Absent for military service. 

42. Absent on leave, first quarter. 

43. Absent for military service. 



Officers of Instruction. 23 

Edward Park Hall, 44 Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology. 

M. D. Ensworth Medical, 1897. Present position, 1911. 

Herbert F. Vanorden, 45 Assistant Professor of Gynecology and Obstet- 
rics. 

Ph. B. Yale, 1907; M. D. Johns Hopkins, 3 910. Instructor in Gynecology and Ob- 
stetrics, Kansas, 1915-17. Present position, 1917. 

Charles Clayton Dennie, 4,! Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

B. S. Baker, 1908; M. D. Kansas, 1912. Present position, 1917. 

Thomas Grover Orr, 47 Assistant Professor of Surgery, Chief of the 
Dispensary, and Pathologist to the Bell Memorial Hospital. 

A. B. University of Missouri, 1907; M. D. Johns Hopkins University, 1910. In- 
structor in Bacteriology, Kansas, 1915. Present position, 1915. 

Sam Earl Roberts, 48 Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology. 

M. D. Kansas, 1911. Present position, 1918. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Eugene Smith, Demonstrator in Anatomy. 

M. D. Rush, 1876. Present position, 1903. 

Lalia Viola Walling, Instructor in Physiology. 

A. B., A. M. Kansas, 1907. Present position, 1908. 

Esther Wilson, Instructor in English. 

A. B. Kansas, 1901; A.M. Kansas, 1902. Instructor in German, Kansas, 1908-18. 
Present position, 1918. 

Alice Winston, Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Chicago, 1898; A.M. Chicago, 1903. Present position, 1909. 

Maria Levering Benson, Instructor in Design and Ceramics. 

Graduate, Newcorab Art School. Present position, 1909. 

William B. Dalton, Instructor in Violoncello. 

Present position, 1911. 

Nellie May Stevenson, Instructor in Correspondence Study. 

A. B. Kansas, 1907. Present position, 1911. 

Hearty Earl Brown, Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Michigan, 1909; A.M. Michigan, 1910. Present position, 1912. 

Sara Grant Laird, Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Oberlin, 1904; A.M. Columbia, 1912. Present position, 1912. 

Myrtle Greenfield, 49 Bacteriologist of State Water and Sewage Lab- 
oratory. 

A. B. Kansas, 1911; A.M. Kansas, 1912. Present position, 1912. 

Joseph Colbert McCanles, Instructor in Band Instruments. 

B. S. Kansas Christian, 1907; LL. B. Kansas, 1909. Present position, 1910. 

Maud Miller, Instructor in Piano. 

Mus. B. Kansas, 1898. Present position, 1904. 



44. Absent for military service. 

45. Absent for military service. 

46. Absent for military service. 

47. Absent for military service. 

48. Absent for military service. 

49. Absent for war work. 



24 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Cora Irene Reynolds, Instructor in Voice. 

Mus. B. Kansas, 1912. Present position, 1913. 

Helen Rhoda Hoopes, Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Kansas, 1913; A.M. Kansas, 1914. Present position, 1914. 

Caroline Baumann Spangler, Instructor in German. 

B. D. Kansas, 1881 ; A. B. Kansas, 1883. Present position, 1914. 

Willard Austin Wattles, 50 Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Kansas, 1909; A.M. Kansas, 1911. Instructor in English, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1911-14. Present position, 1914. 

Esther Lydia Swenson, 51 Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Minnesota, 1911; A.M. Minnesota, 1914. Present position, 1914. 

Hazel Katherine Allen, Instructor in Home Economics. 

Ph. B. Chicago, 1913. Present position, 1914. 

Hazel Helen Pratt, Instructor in Physical Education. 

A. B. Ohio State, 1914; Graduate, Harvard School of Physical Education, 1915. 
Physical Director, Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1914-15. Present posi- 
tion, 1915. 

Laurens Ellis Whittemore, 52 Instructor in Physics. 

A. B. Washburn College, 1914; A.M. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 1915. 

Clifford Winslow Seibel, 53 Instructor in Chemistry. 

B. S. Kansas, 1913. Present position, 1913. 

Oscar Rocklund, Instructor in Machine Construction and Acting Super- 
intendent of Fowler Shops. 

Present position, 1913. 

Walter Blaine Bodenhafer, 54 Instructor in Sociology. 

A. B. Indiana, 1911; LL. B. Indiana, 1912; A.M. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 
1915. 

Peter Anton Frederik Appelboom, 55 Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Graduate, Academie Royale Maritime of Holland. Present position, February, 1915. 

Donald Gildersleeve Paterson, 56 Instructor in Psychology. 

A. B. Ohio State, 1914; A.M. Ohio State, 1915. Graduate Assistant in Psychology, 
Ohio State, 1914-15; Laboratory Assistant in Psychology, Ohio State, 1915-16. Present 
position, 1916. 

Arthur Jackson Mix, 57 Instructor in Plant Pathology. 

A. B. Hamilton, 1910; Ph.D. Cornell "University, 1916. Assistant Botanist, New 
York Agricultural Experiment Station, 1915-16. Present position, 1916. 

Norman Fraser Strachan, 58 Instructor in Sanitary Engineering, and 
Assistant Engineer of the State Board of Health. 

B. S. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 1916. 

Paul Bowen Lawson, Instructor in Entomology. 

B. S. Oskaloosa, 1909; M.S. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1916. 

50. Absent for military service, first quarter. 

51. Absent for war work. 

52. Absent for Avar work. 

53. Absent for war work. 

54. Absent on leave. 

55. Absent for war work. 

56. Absent for war work. 

57. Absent for war work, first and second quarters. 

58. Absent for military service. * 



Officers of Instruction. 25 

Emily Victoria Berger, Instructor in Chemistry. 

A. B. Kansas, 1914. Assistant Instructor in Chemistry, 191(5-17. Present position, 
1917. 

Sybil Woodruff," 11 Instructor in Home Economics. 

A. R. Kansas, 1916. Assistant Instructor in Home Economics, Kansas, 1916-17. 
Present position, 1917. 

LaForce Bailey, Instructor in Architecture. 

B. S. in Architecture, Ullinois, 1915; M.S. in Architecture, Illinois, 1916. Assistant 
Instructor in Architecture, Kansas, 1916-17. Present position, 1917. 

Agnes Anderson Murray, Instructor in Chemistry. 

A. B. Baker, 1909: A.M. Kansas, 1911. Analyst in Food Laboratory, Kansas, 
1911-15. Present position, 1917. 

Elbert Lee Treece, Instructor in Bacteriology. 

B. S. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1917. 

Cornelia Mitchell Downs, Instructor in Bacteriology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 1917. 

William Adelbert Dill, Instructor in Journalism. 

A. B. Oregon, 1908. Present position, 1917. 

Gertrude Theoren Hazen, 60 Instructor in Home Economics. 

A. B. Baker, 1914, A. M. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 1917. 

James Edward Bond, Instructor in Physical Education. 

A. B. Kansas, 1910. Present position, 1917. 

Harry Allan Forney, Instructor in Machine Construction. 

Present position, 1917. 

Gordon LaFayette Cram, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. (Honors) University of Toronto, 1894; A.M. Columbia University, 1904. Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages, Kenyon College, 1914-15; Dickinson College, 1916-17. 
Present position, 1917. 

Ida Faragher,* Instructor in Psychology. 

Present position, 1918. 

Amy Van Horn Rader, Instructor in Chemistry. 

A. B. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1918. 

William Byron Brown, Instructor in Journalism and Superintendent 
of Printing Plant. 

Assistant Instructor in Journalism, Kansas, 1913-18. Present position, 1918. 

Jose Maria Osma, Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

College des Freres des Ecoles Chretiennes, Escuelo de Bellos Artes, Barcelona, Spain; 
Ecole des Beaux Arts and Academie Vitty, Paris. Instructor, Colegio Superior de 
Senoritas, 1910-1913; Colegio Superior de Senoritas y Seccion Normal, 1913-1917; Liceo 
de Costa Rica, 1913-1917; Instructor in Romance Languages, Kansas, 1917-18. Present 
position, 1918. 

William Sidney Spicer, Instructor in Anatomy. 

B. S. Kansas, 1916; M.S. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1918. 

Anna Marm, Instructor in Mathematics. 

A. B. Bethany College, 1909; A.M. Kansas, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Florence Black, Instructor in Mathematics. 

A. B. Kansas, 1913. Present position, 1918. 



* Resigned, March, 1919. 

59. Absent on leave. 

60. Absent for Avar work. 



26 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Henry Arthur Shinn, Instructor in Public Speaking. 

A. B. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

Minerva C. Hall, Instructor in Public School Music. 

New England Conservatory, 1904 ; American Institute of Normal Methods, North- 
western, 1907. Instructor in Music, Illinois State Normal, 191416; Director High 
School Music and Instructor in Public School Music, Washburn, 1916-18. Present 
position, 1918. 

Margaret Husson, Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

William Curtis Swabey, Instructor in Philosophy. 

A. B. Stanford, 1915; A.M. Cornell, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

Dorothy Walker Cole, Instructor in Physical Education. 

A. B. Kansas, 1918; Harvard Summer School of Physical Education, 1918. Present 
position, 1918. 

Jose Maria Albaladejo, Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

Bachiller, Instituto Cardenal Cisneros, Madrid, 1909; Instructor Indiana University, 
1916-18. 

Neva Ritter, Acting Bacteriologist, Water and Sewage Laboratory. 

A. B. Kansas, 1916; A.M. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1918. 

Arthur Reed Bailey, Instructor in Machine Construction. 

Present position, 1918. 

John Ambrose Hess, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1908; A.M. Kansas, 1910. Instructor in German, Kansas, 1909-10; 
Instructor in German, Indiana, 1910-15; Assistant Professor of German, Indiana, 1915-18. 
Present position, 1918. 

William Frederick Lange, Instructor in Chemistry. 

B. S. in Ed. Missouri, 1916. Instructor in Physics, East Texas Normal College, 1917; 
Instructor in Chemistry, Southern Methodist Universitv, summer 1917. Present position, 
1918. 

Albert Charles Rutherford, Instructor in Machine Construction. 

Present position, 1918. 

Nellie Barnes, Instructor in Rhetoric. 

A. B. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

Irene Scrutchfield, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

B. S. in Ed. Missouri, 1909; A. B. Missouri, 1913; A.M. Wisconsin, 1918. Instructor 
in French and German, Lindenwood Junior College, 1913-17. Present position, 1918. 

Ruth Stevenson, Instructor in Home Economics. 

A. B. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1918. 

Bertha Marie Jones, Instructor in Home Economics. 

A. B. Illinois, 1911; A.M. Teachers College, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Alpha Loretta Owens, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1901; A.M. Kansas, 1903. Instructor, Missouri Christian College, 
1904-05. Present position, 1918. 

Clara Louise Fisher, Instructor in Correspondence Study. 

A. B. North Dakota, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Wilbur Arthur Baker, Instructor in Pathology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1915; M. D. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1918. 

Margaret L. Irwin, Instructor in Bacteriology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1918. Present position, 1918. 



Officers of Instruction. 27 

Vera Weatherhogg O'Keefe,* Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1915; A.M. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

Edward C. Perry, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Yale, 1905. Oahu College, Honolulu, 1901. Present position, 1918. 

Justice Neale Carman, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Kansas, 1917. Present position, 1918. 

Mary Lillian Johns, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Michigan, 1916; Berlitz School of Languages, Cihcago, 1918. Present position, 
1918. 

Adelaide Steger, Instructor in Physical Education. 

A. B. Arizona, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Marion Lewis, Instructor in Journalism. 

Present position, 1918. 

Myrtle Elliott Thurnau, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Michigan, 1907. Present position, 1918. 

Alva Christine Ellisor, Instructor in Geology. 

A. B. Texas, 1915. Instructor in Geology, Texas, 1916-18. Present position, 1918. 

E. Ambrose White, Custodian and Instructor in Chemistry. 

M. S. Kansas, 1909. Present position, 1918. 

Clifford C. Nesselrode/ 1 Instructor in Surgical Anatomy. 

M. D. Kansas, 1906. Present position, 1905. 

Joseph L. McDermott, Instructor in Roentgen Therapy. 

M. D. Kansas, 1907. Present position, 1914. 

Laurence A. Lynch, Instructor in Medicine. 

M. D. Creighton, 1914. Present position, 1918. 

William Andrew Wilson/'- 2 Instructor in Surgery. 

A. B. Illinois, 1899; M. D. St. Louis, 1904. Present position, 1918. 

Frank Ridge, 03 Instructor in Medicine. 

M. D. , 19 — . Present position, 1918. 

Joseph B. Cowherd, Instructor in Medicine. 

M. D. , 19 — . Present position, 1918. 

George L. Harrington,^ Instructor in Medicine. 

M. D. Kansas, 1908. Present position, 1918. 

Harvey P. Boughnou/' 5 Instructor in Medicine. 

M. D. , 19 — . Present position, 1918. 

Wilson A. Myers, Instructor in Medicine. 

M. D. , 19 — . Present position, 1918. 

* Resigned, February, 1919. 

61. Absent for military service. 

62. Absent for military service. 

63. Absent for military service. 

64. Absent for military service. 

65. Absent for military service. 



28 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 



ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 

Larry M. Peace, Preparator and Demonstrator in the Botanical Labora- 
tory. 

A. B. Kansas, 1901; A.M. Kansas, 1906. Present position, 1902. 

Handel T. Martin, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

Present position, 1907. 

Charles D. Bunker, Assistant Curator of Mammals, Birds and Fishes. 

A. B. Kansas, 1901; A.M. Kansas, 1906. Present position, 1902. 

Charles Paul Alexander,* Assistant Curator in Entomology. 

B. S. Cornell, 1913; Ph.D. Cornell, 1918. Instructor in Natural History, Cornell, 
1914-17. Present position, 1917. 

Lena Mae Smyth, Technician in Bacteriology and Pathology. 

A. B. Nebraska, 1912. Present position, 1915. 

Bessie Douthitt, Assistant Instructor in Zoology. 

Present position, 1917. 

Edgar E. Pickens, Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

M. D. Nashville, 1901. Present position, 1917. 

Nelse Frederick Ockerblad, Assistant in Surgery. 

B. S. Hanover, 1914; M. D. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

Fred Crosby Rumsey, Assistant in Surgery. 

M. D. Kansas, 1909. Present position, 1918. 

Otto Jason Dixon, 60 * Dispensary Attendant. 

A. B. Kansas, 1914; M. D. Kansas, 1916. Present position, 1918. 

John Llewellyn Myers, Dispensary Attendant. 

A. B. Park College, 1901 ; M. D. Kansas City College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
1904. Present position, 1918. 

Jessie Reed Newsom, Technician in Anatomy. 

A. B. Kansas, 1914. Present position, 1918. 

Charles Alva Keener, Assistant Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

Present position, 1918. 

Mary Elizabeth Larson, Assistant Instructor in Zoology. 

Present position, 1918. 

Ruth Endacott, Assistant Instructor in Physiology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Stella Vanera Miller, Assistant Bacteriolgist, Water and Sewage 
Laboratory. 

A. B. Kansas, 1918. Present position, 1918. 

Virgil W. McCarty, 67 Assistant in Otorhinolaryngology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1909; M. D. Kansas, 1912. Present position, 1918. 

Darwin W. Delap, Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

M. D. Rush Medical College, 1909. Present position, 1918. 

Herbert S. Valentine, 68 Assistant in Medicine. 

M. D. , 19 — . Present position, 1918. 

* Resigned, March, 1919. 

66. Absent for military service. * Resigned, March, 1919. 

67. Absent for military service. 

68. Absent for military service. 



Officers of Instruction. 29 



Ada G. Ehrman, Assistant in Operating Room. 
Present position, 1918. 

Kate Noble, Assistant in the Dispensary. 

R. N. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 1918. 

Edith McKee, Assistant in Roentgenology. 

Present position, 1918. 

Mary Edna Darland, Assistant in Otorhinolaryngology. 

A. B. Kansas, 1913; M. D. Kansas, 1915. Present position, 191* 



THE UNIVERSITY. 



The University embraces the following schools and divisions: 
The Graduate School. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 
The School of Engineering. 
The School of Fine Arts. 
The School of Law. 
The School of Pharmacy. 
The School of Medicine. 
The School of Education. 
The Summer Session Division. 
The University Extension Division. 
The Division of Athletics. 
The Division of Libraries. 
The Division of Museums. 
The Division of Publications. 
The Division of State Service Work. 
The Division of University Surveys. 
The Division of Vocations. 



THE SCHOOLS. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.' 

The Graduate School is open to those holding a bachelor's degree 
from an institution of recognized standing. 

The School confers the following advanced degrees: Doctor of 
philosophy, master of arts, master of science, civil engineer, mechani- 
cal engineer, engineer of mines, chemical engineer, and electrical engi- 
neer. Students who take the master's degree in the minimum period of 
one year must be fully prepared to do graduate work; those who are not 
so prepared find it necessary to take a longer time. The degree of doctor 
of philosophy may be given after three years of resident graduate work, 
the last year, at least, being spent at the University of Kansas. Gradu- 
ates of engineering in this University and masters of science who ma- 
jored in engineering in the Graduate School may become candidates for 
professional engineering degrees after three years of professional service 

For the encouragement of higher education, seventeen University 
fellowships are given to students who have excelled in undergraduate 
work, and ten fellowships are provided for graduates of Kansas Colleges. 

1. Detailed information will be found in Section IT. 

(31) 



32 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES. 2 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers a four-year curriculum, 
based upon a four-year high-school course and leading to the bachelor's 
degree. It includes courses offered by the following departments: 

Bacteriology. Latin Language and Literature. 

Botany. Mathematics. 

Chemistry. Music. 

Design. Philosophy and Psychology. 

Economics and Commerce. Physical Education. 

English Language and Literature. Physics and Astronomy. 

Entomology. Physiology. 

Geology and Mineralogy. Political Science. 

Germanic Languages and Litera- Public Speaking. 

tures. Romance Languages and Litera- 

Greek Language and Literature. tures. 

History. Sociology. 

Home Economics. Zoology. 
Journalism. 

While the courses are largely elective, the requirements governing 
election have been made with a view to securing a well-rounded program 
as well as a reasonable degree of specialization. 

The purpose of the College is to provide a liberal education; but 
College students who intend to become candidates for, professional de- 
grees may elect certain courses in some of the professional schools. 

THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 3 

Opportunities for study are offered to high-school graduates who wish 
to fit themselves for the technical branches of industrial work. The lines 
cf study as they are formulated are under the usual engineering titles, as 
follows : 

Civil Engineering, pertaining mainly to transportation, to design and 
construction of bridges and public works, to municipal and sanitary prob- 
lems, and to government work in the survey of lands, in irrigation 
projects, etc. 

Electrical Engineering, pertaining mainly to design, manufacture and 
operation of electric-power generating machinery, telephone apparatus 
and electrical instruments, and public utilities plants where such equip- 
ment is employed. 

Mechanical Engineering, pertaining mainly to manufacturing processes 
and the plants for carrying on those processes, with especial attention 
given to the design and construction of machinery. Steam, gas, and re- 
frigeration engineering are included. 

Mining Engineering, School of Mines, emphasizing in equal degree the 
mining processes for coal and metal production, and the subsequent 
treatment of ores. 

2. Detailed information will be found in Section III. 

3. Detailed information will be found in Section IV. 



The University Schools. 33 

Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, pertaining mainly to chemi- 
cal analytical methods and to the great variety of manufacturing proc- 
esses which have a chemical or metallurgical basis. 

Architectural Engineering, devoted to the design and construction of 
all classes of buildings. Much attention is given to pure architectural 
design, as well as to structural problems. 

Engineering and Administrative Science, in which economics courses 
are grouped with engineering fundamentals to form the basis for a busi- 
ness career with transportation or manufacturing enterprises. 

The curriculum is prepared in two forms. One is more strictly tech- 
nical and provides for the completion of the necessary amount of work in 
four years by those who are prepared to carry heavy work. Many stu- 
dents find it desirable to take more time. The degree given is bachelor 

of science in engineering. The other provides for five full years of 

work, the first year to be taken in the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
degree given is bachelor of science. The latter plan is recommended to 
all recent graduates of high schools. 

THE SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.* 

The School of Fine Arts is made up of the Department of Music and 
the Department of Painting. It offers courses in piano, organ, violin, 
violoncello playing, voice culture, drawing and painting, and public- 
school music. 

The four-year curriculum in music leads to the degree of bachelor 
of music; in painting, to the degree of bachelor of painting. An artist's 
certificate is given on completion of a four-year special curriculum in 
piano, organ, violin, violoncello or voice culture. A teacher's certificate 
is given on completion of a three-year curriculum in the same subjects. 
A teacher's certificate is also given on completion of the two-year spe- 
cial curriculum in public-school music or in public-school drawing. On 
completion of the two latter curricula the State Board of Education will 
grant a special state certificate entitling the holder to teach music or 
drawing in any of the graded or high schools of the state. 

THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 5 

The School of Law offers three years of legal instruction leading to 
the degree of bachelor of law. One year of college work in addition to 
graduation from an accredited high school is required for admission. 

The object of the School is to teach the principles of the common law 
and to furnish a course of legal instruction that shall prepare the student 
to deal with legal problems and to practice in any state in the Union. 

Provision is also made to give those who do not expect to practice 
law, but who desire a knowledge of certain branches of the law for busi- 
ness purposes, such instruction as may be best fitted to their needs. 

4. Detailed information will be found in Section V. 

5. Detailed information will be found in Section VI. 



3— K. U.— 5419. 



34 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 6 

The School of Pharmacy is organized to give instruction and practical 
training in all branches connected with the pharmaceutical profession. 
The work is open to graduates of accredited high schools and to students 
having an equivalent preliminary education. 

Three complete curricula are offered: a two-year curriculum leading 
to the degree of graduate in pharmacy, a three-year curriculum leading 
to the degree of pharmaceutical chemist, and a four-year curriculum 
leading to the degree of bachelor in pharmacy. 

Provision is also made for those who desire to pursue special lines 
of pharmaceutical investigation, regardless of a degree. 

Connected with the School is the state laboratory for drug analysis, 
which affords ample opportunity for those who are preparing for gov- 
ernmental and .state work. 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE.' 

The School of Medicine offers a four-year medical curriculum based 
on two years of college work and leading to the degree of doctor of 
medicine. The work of the first year and a half is done at Lawrence, in 
the main laboratories of the University. This work embraces the sci- 
entific subjects, or so-called "medical sciences," and forms the basis for 
the practical work of the last two years. The last two and a half 
years' work is done at Rosedale, where the Bell Memorial Hospital, owned 
and conducted by the University of Kansas, is located. 

The Training School for Nurses, at the Bell Memorial Hospital in 
Rosedale, offers a course extending over two and a half years. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATIONS 

The School of Education has for its functions the professional training 
of teachers and superintendents, and the maintenance of a bureau of 
school service. 

Work done in the School of Education is based upon two years of 
college work and leads to the degree of bachelor of science in education. 
Candidates for the college degree of bachelor of arts or the graduate 
degree of master of arts may elect education courses, subject to the 
regulations of the faculty concerned. 

The faculty of the School of Education grants the University Teach- 
er's Diploma to persons receiving any one of the degrees mentioned 
above, on the fulfillment of conditions described in the bulletin of the 
School of Education. This Teacher's Diploma entitles the holder to a 
Kansas state teacher's certificate. 

6. Detailed information will be found in Section VII. 

7. Detailed information will be found in Section VIII. 

8. Detailed information will be found in Section IX. 



THE DIVISIONS. 

SUMMER SESSION. 

There are two terms of the Summer Session, of six weeks and four 
weeks, respectively, each independent of the other in the courses offered. 
The first term begins immediately after Commencement Day. The sec- 
ond term begins the day after the first term closes. 

Most of the work offered in the Summer Session is chosen from the 
courses given regularly in the various schools, and may be counted to- 
ward degrees in the same way as if taken in the regular academic year. 

The maximum amount of credit that may be earned in the Summer 
Session is six hours for the first term and four hours for the second. 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION. 1 

Through the Correspondence-study Department the following courses 
are offered: 

First. Regular University studies which may, under approved condi- 
tions, be taken for credit toward a degree. 

Second. High-school -and preparatory studies for those who cannot 
arrange to attend the established institutions. 

Third. Vocational courses, which supply knowledge and training that 
have a direct bearing upon the advancement and efficiency in given occupa- 
tions. 

Fourth. Advanced courses, designed to help those in professional or 
practical life to keep in touch with certain advancing conditions of sci- 
ence and knowledge. 

Classes under regular University instructors can be offered in a lim- 
ited number of communities where several desire to take up the same 
course. All courses offered by the Correspondence-study Department, 
whether taken for University credit or not, are on a uniform basis with 
reference to the amount of work covered. Work which is satisfactorily 
completed has, therefore, a definite value. 

ATHLETICS. 2 

Senate Regulation. The University Senate has adopted rules govern- 
ing the standing of all those who represent the University in athletic 
contests. Good scholarship and gentlemanly conduct are required of all 
such contestants. 

Athletic Association. This association is organized to promote and 
control the intercollegiate athletics of the University of Kansas. The 
Chancellor is ex officio president, and there are five faculty and five 
student members. The athletic director is general manager of athletics. 
All forms of athletics are under the immediate control of the director 
and his assistants, who are also members of the faculty. 

1. Detailed information will be found in Section XI. 

2. Detailed information will be found in Section XII. 

(35) 



36 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Intramural Athletics. The general athletics of the University include 
football, baseball, basket ball, track, tennis, and soccer. Intramural con- 
tests are held in all branches. 

Intercollegiate Games. The University of Kansas is a member of the 
Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association, and a full schedule 
of games in football, baseball, basket ball, track, and tennis is arranged 
with members of that association and other educational institutions. 

LIBRARIES. 2 

The Libraries of the University contain 125,212 volumes and some 
44,000 pamphlets. An annual appropriation of $17,000 is devoted to the 
purchase of books. The periodical room receives 1,185 periodicals and 
publications of learnejd societies, and 121 newspapers published in Kan- 
sas. The departments of Germanic Languages, Romance Languages, 
Latin, English, Education, American and European History, Sociology 
and Economics have special reading rooms in Spooner Library. 

Nine departmental libraries are housed in the buildings used by their 
respective departments or schools, each in charge of an assistant 
librarian. 

The Library of the Kansas Academy of Science, in charge of the 
secretary of the Academy, is housed in Fraser Hall. 

MUSEUMS. 2 

The scientific collections belonging to the University are grouped ac- 
cording to the teaching department in charge. 

The botanical collection contains 10,000 identified and labeled speci- 
mens. 

The entomological collections comprise about 26,000 species and 300,- 
000 specimens. 

Geology is represented by extensive collections of specimens in eco- 
nomic, petrographic and mineralogical groups. 

In paleobotany and paleontology the collection is one of the most com- 
plete in America. 

The zoological collections are rich and varied. 

The classical museum contains a collection of casts of Greek and 
Roman sculpture, facsimile reproductions of objects of art and utility, 
original coins, and photographs. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS. 2 

The University of Kansas Science Bulletin is maintained by the Uni- 
versity as the medium for the publication of the results of original re- 
search by members of the University. Two or three volumes are issued 
in each academic year. The price of subscription is three dollars a vol- 
ume. Individual numbers vary in price with the cost of publication. 

University of Kansas Studies, Humanistic Series, is a series devoted to 
the presentation of the results of research along humanistic lines. The 

2. Detailed information will be found in Section XII. 



The Divisions. 37 

numbers are issued at irregular intervals. Each number is a complete 
monograph, and its price varies with the cost of publication. Arrange- 
ments for exchange may be made by addressing the University Library. 

The University Geological Survey Bulletins are issued from time to 
time as material for them is gathered. 

The University Entomological Bulletins are reports issued in regular 
series from time to time, comprising the results of entomological investi- 
gations conducted by the University. These deal in part with applied 
problems of practical value referred to the University by various in- 
terests of the state, and in part with fundamental research problems pre- 
sented by such investigations. These publications, will be sent free to 
any citizen of the state upon application. 

The Bulletin of the Engineering Experiment Station is the medium 
through which the results of investigations in engineering lines are pub- 
lished. Numbers are issued at irregular intervals, as material becomes 
available, usually two or three each year. It is under the direction of 
an Experiment Station staff. Communications should be addressed to 
the Director. 

STATE SERVICE WORK. 3 

Entomological Field Work. In conjunction with the State Agricul- 
tural College, the University conducts the field work of the State Ento- 
mological Commission. 

Water Analysis. The University in cooperation with the State Board 
of Health maintains laboratories for the chemical and bacteriological 
examination of water. The special purpose of this examination is to 
assist Kansas communities to secure and preserve safe supplies of water. 

Ceramics and Kansas Clays. The University is engaged in the ex- 
amination of the clays of the state and the determination of their fit- 
ness for the fine and useful arts. 

State Chemical Research. This division of the Department of Chem- 
istry is engaged in the study of chemical problems in which the in- 
dustries or the communities of Kansasl may be interested. 

Food and Drug Analysis. By legislative enactment it is the duty of 
the University to examine samples of food and drugs for their purity, 
and report to the State Board of Health. 

Weights and Measures. The University has in its custody the sets of 
standard weights and measures of the state; and the deputy state 
sealer, who is a member of the faculty, tests weights and measures in 
the enforcement of the laws governing commercial standards. 

Engineering Experiment Station. Numerous investigations and ex- 
periments with Kansas building stone, brick and stone paving, the 
purification of sewage, the properties of coal, natural gas, and oils, the 
calibration of metering appliances for municipal service, etc., have been 
conducted and the results published in a series of bulletins. 



3. Detailed information will be found in Section XII. 



38 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

university surveys. 3 

Biological Survey. A biological survey of the state is being conducted 
by the departments of Botany, Zoology, and Entomology. The results 
are made known in special reports. 

Geological Survey. The work of the geological survey is carried on 
through field expeditions sent out annually. The results thus far have 
been published in ten volumes, besides bulletins. 

VOCATIONS. 

A Vocations Division has been organized recently. It will collect in- 
formation about vocations suitable for University-trained men and women 
and will make this information available for the use of students and 
others. It will also encourage research into the possibilities of vocational 
guidance. 



HISTORY. 



The idea of a State University in Kansas dates from the early days 
of Kansas territorial government. Each of the constitutions adopted for 
the territory of Kansas during the period of its memorable struggle pro- 
vided for the establishment of an institution of higher learning, to be 
supported by public funds. The last of these, which became, on the ad- 
mission of Kansas to the Union, the constitution of the state, declares 
that "provision shall be made by law for the establishment, at some 
eligible and central point, of a State University, for the promotion of 
literature and the arts and sciences." 

By an act of Congress approved January 29, 1861, the day on which 
Kansas was admitted to statehood, seventy-two sections of land were 
set apart and reserved for the use and support of a State University. 
The state accepted the trust, and in 1863 the legislature selected the 
city of Lawrence as the location for the institution. One year later the 
legislature passed an act organizing the University and giving to it the 
name of "The University of Kansas." A charter was immediately drawn 
up, and the government of the institution was vested in a Board of 
Regents, appointed by the governor. 

The board thus appointed held its first meeting on March 21, 1865, 
and decided to open a preparatory department as soon as the citizens of 
Lawrence should provide rooms for that purpose. This the citizens 
undertook to do, and by the middle of September, 1866, they were enabled, 
by the aid of gifts from various individuals and organizations, to erect 
the building known for 46 years (from the erection of Fraser Hall, in 
1872, to the demolition of "Old North" itself, in 1918) as North College. 
The first faculty of the University had been elected by the Board of Re- 
gents in July of the same year, and on the 12th of September the Uni- 
versity was opened to the young men and women of the state. 

3. Detailed information will be found in Section XII. 



History. 39 

In 1876 the legislature of the state established a normal department, 
which, though successful, was discontinued in 1885. The Law School was 
opened in October, 1878, and the School of Pharmacy was established in 
1885. A course in engineering was arranged as early as 1873, but re- 
mained a part of the collegiate department until 1891, when the School of 
Engineering was organized and the collegiate department became known 
as the School of Arts. During the same year the preparatory department 
was discontinued, and the Departments of Music and Art, established 
in 1877, were combined to form the School of Fine Arts. The Graduate 
School was organized in 1896; and in 1899 the preparatory medical 
course, which had been offered in the collegiate department since 1880, 
was made independent as a School of Medicine, the first two years only 
being given. In 1905 the clinical departments were added at Rosedale, 
thus completing a four-year medical course. In 1904 the Board of Re- 
gents changed the name of the School of Arts to the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences. The Summer Session Division was established 
in 1903; the School of Education and the Division of University Exten- 
sion were established in 1909; the Division of Athletics was established 
in 1915; the Division of Vocations was established in 1919. 

The Rev. R. W. Oliver, the first Chancellor of the University, resigned 
his position after one year of service, and was succeeded by Gen. John 
Fraser. In 1874 Dr. James Marvin was made Chancellor. His resigna- 
tion, in 1883, was followed by the election of Dr. Joshua A. Lippincott, 
who served until June, 1889, when Mr. W. C. Spangler, a graduate of 
the University and a member of the Board of Regents, was appointed to 
act as Chancellor until the election of a regular incumbent. In 1890, 
Prof. Francis H. Snow, who had been a member of the faculty from the 
beginning, was elected. When, in 1901, Chancellor Snow resigned on ac- 
count of failing health, Mr. Spangler again became acting Chancellor, 
serving until Dr. Frank Strong assumed the office, August 1, 1902. 

In 1913 the powers belonging to the Board of Regents passed by legis- 
lative act to the State Board of Administration. In 1917 these powers 
passed to a newly constituted board controlling all state institutions, edu- 
cational, charitable, and correctional. This board took office July 1, 1917. 

The legislature of 1917 passed senate concurrent resolution No. 15, 
submitting a constitutional amendment for a permanent income for the 
state educational institutions, authorizing the legislature to levy a 
permanent tax for the use and benefit of the state educational institu- 
tions and apportioning among and appropriating the same to the several 
institutions, the levy, apportionment and appropriation to continue until 
changed by statute. It was specifically provided that: "Nothing herein 
contained shall prevent such further appropriation by the legislature as 
may be deemed necessary from time to time for the needs of certain state 
educational institutions." 

This amendment was carried at the general election in November, 1918, 
by a very large majority and is construed as a vote of confidence by the 
state in the educational institutions and as a warrant for their existence 
and development. 



40 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 



GOVERNMENT. 

THE BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION. 

By act of the legislature of 1917, the State Board of Administration 
consists of the Governor, who acts ex officio as chairman, three members 
appointed by the Governor, and a business manager chosen by the board. 
This board has full power to administer the affairs of the University, 
subject only to legislative enactments. The term of office is four years. 

THE UNIVERSITY SENATE. 

The University Senate consists of the Chancellor, the deans and di- 
rectors of divisions, and all members of the instructional staff having 
the rank of professor or associate professor. The Senate has jurisdic- 
tion over all internal matters involving general University policy. The 
Chancellor is ex officio chairman and executive officer of the Senate. 

THE FACULTIES OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The faculty of each school consists of the Chancellor, the Dean, and 
all professors, associate professors, assistant professors and instructors 
giving work in that school. It has jurisdiction over all matters which 
concern primarily its own school. The Chancellor is chairman of each 
faculty. The Dean of each school is its executive officer. 

DEPARMENTAL FACULTIES. 

A departmental staff consists of all members of its instructional force. 
It has jurisdiction over all matters which concern primarily its own in- 
ternal policy. 

UNIVERSITY DIVISION COMMITTEES. 

A university division is a body having relations with more than one 
of the schools or departments of the University. The divisions are ad- 
ministered by committees, subject to the general regulations of the 
Senate. Each division has an executive officer, called the Director. 



EQUIPMENT. 

PROPERTY AND INCOME. 

The University owns equipment, buildings, and grounds of an esti- 
mated value of $2,000,000. It receives in normal years about $70,000 
annually from fees and $7,200 from the land fund. For the biennium of 
1917-1919 the state appropriated $1,523,000, including $225,000 for build- 
ing. 



Buildings and Equipment. 41 

the campus. 

The campus, comprising some 160 acres of hill top and hill slope, has 
so far contrived to retain much of its natural beauty. The buildings 
follow the curve of the hill; the walks take the line of least resistance; 
the trees in North Hollow form a tangled mass much appreciated by- 
birds and art students. There has been almost no conventional planting. 

The campus of the Medical School at Rosedale also lies high and is 
capable of artistic development. 

BUILDINGS. 

There are twenty-two University buildings, of which sixteen were 
erected by the state and six by private gift. 

Fraser Hall was erected in 1872. Its total cost has been approximately 
$182,000, of which one-half was appropriated by the legislature, and one- 
half contributed by the city of Lawrence. In this building are located the 
executive offices of the University, including the Chancellor's office and 
the office of the Registrar; the offices of the Dean of the College, the 
Alumni Secretary, the Adviser of Women, and the University Extension 
Division; the offices and recitation rooms of the Departments of English, 
German, Greek, Latin, Romance Languages and Home Economics, and the 
School of Education; also, the classical museum. The building is named 
in honor of Gen. John Fraser, the first active Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity. 

Medical Hall was erected in 1884, at a cost of $12,000— $8,000 from 
interest on the permanent endowment fund of the University, and $4,000 
appropriated by the legislature. The physiological laboratories are 
located on the second floor. The basement is occupied by the Department 
of Journalism. 

Snow Hall was erected by the state in 1886, at a cost of $50,000. In 
this building are located the laboratories and lecture rooms of the De- 
partments of Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, Zoology and Medical 
Physiology. The laboratories of the State Water Survey are located in 
the south side of the basement. The building is named in honor of Prof. 
Francis Huntington Snow. 

The Heating Plant was erected by the state in 1887, at a cost of 
$16,000, and after a fire in 1898 was rebuilt and equipped at a cost of 
$30,000. 

Spooner Library was erected in 1894, at a cost of $75,000, through the 
generosity of William B. Spooner, of Boston. On the first or main floor 
are located the general reading room, a newspaper room, and the Li- 
brarian's and Cataloguer's offices. 

The Chancellor's Residence was erected in 1894, at a cost of $12,000, 
from the William B. Spooner bequest. 

Blake Hall was erected by the state in 1895, at a cost of $58,000. It is 
occupied by the Department of Physics and Astronomy. It is named in 
honor of Prof. Lucien Ira Blake. 



42 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

Fowler Shops was completed in 1899, at a cost of $21,000. It was 
Riven by Mr. George A. Fowler, of Kansas City, Mo., as a memorial of 
his father. It is devoted primarily to instruction in shop work. 

The Chemistry and Pharmacy Building was completed in 1900, at a 
cost of $70,000, appropriated by the legislature. The building is ar- 
ranged specifically for laboratory purposes for the Departments of 
Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

The Dyche Museum of Natural History, named in honor of Prof. 
Lewis L. Dyche, was erected by the state in 1902, at a cost of $75,000. 
It houses collections in entomology, paleontology, mammals, and birds. 
Part of the basement is occupied by the Department of Anatomy. 

Green Hall, named in honor of Dean James W. Green, was erected 
by the state in 1905, at a cost of $65,000. It is occupied by the School 
of Law and the Department of Public Speaking. 

The Robinson Auditorium-Gymnasium was erected by the state in 1905, 
at a cost of $100,000. By removing the apparatus, the gymnasium may 
be transformed into an auditorium with a seating capacity of 3,000. The 
building is named in honor of Charles Robinson, first governor of 
Kansas, and his wife, Mrs. Sara T. D. Robinson. 

The Eleanor Taylor Bell Memorial Hospital. The first section of the 
Bell Memorial Hospital, at Rosedale, was erected in 1905, at a cost of 
$30,000, on property and by funds given to the University for that pur- 
pose by Dr. Simeon B. Bell, of Rosedale, and was named in memory of 
his wife. In 1911 a second section was built through an appropriation 
by the legislature of $50,000. The combined hospital has about seventy- 
six beds, and is used as a teaching hospital. To it are sent county pa- 
tients under the indigent poor law, the crippled children law, and the 
obstetrical service law. 

The Clinical Laboratory at Rosedale was erected in 1906, at a cost of 
$40,000, on property and by funds furnished by Dr. Simeon B. Bell. 

The Service Building, erected by the state in 1908, contains the office 
of the superintendent of buildings and grounds, and the workmen's shops. 

Marvin Hall was erected by the state in 1907, at a cost of about 
$90,000. It contains equipment and classrooms for the general work of 
the School of Engineering. This building is named in honor of Frank 
O. Marvin, first Dean of the School. 

The Power Plant and Mechanical Laboratory was completed in 1909, 
at a cost of about $23,000. In the power-plant section are the power- 
generating machinery for lights and power for the University and the 
pumps for the regular water service and fire protection. The laboratory 
section contains equipment for instruction in technical engineering work. 

Haworth Hall was erected by the state in 1909, at a cost of $50,000. 
A $7,500 clay laboratory was added in 1911. This building is named in 
honor of Erasmus Haworth, professor of geology. 

Liberal Arts Building. The east wing of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences and Administration Building was erected in 1911 by the 
state, at a cost of $125,000. It is occupied by the Departments of Eco- 



Buildings and Equipment. 43 

nomics, History and Political Science, Mathematics, Philosophy, and So- 
ciology; the psychological laboratories occupy the basement, and the De- 
partment of Drawing and Painting the third floor. 

The legislature of 1917 appropriated $225,000 for the erection of 
classrooms in the middle section and west wing. These are shortly to be 
occupied by the School of Fine Arts and the foreign language depart- 
ments. The Thayer collection w.ill be housed here. 

The Dispensary Building at Rosedale was erected in 1915, at a cost of 
$25,000, provided by the legislature. 

Oread Training School was erected in 1915, at a cost of $6,000. This 
sum was largely a gift of the School. 

The Vivarium was built in 1916 from the fund for permanent repairs 
and improvements. 

The Barracks were erected in the fall of 1918 for the use of the Stu- 
dents' Army Training Corps. The army and navy sections occupied 
eight buildings on Mississippi street; the vocational section three build- 
ings between Haworth Hall and Marvin Hall. The prevalence of 
Spanish influenza made necessary the erection of the "Pneumonia Hos- 
pital," flanking the Mississippi street barracks. 



UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 



GENERAL. 



The Alumni Association is composed of all persons holding degrees 
granted by the University, though active membership is limited to those 
who pay annuai dues. An endowment membership is maintained for 
those who subscribe to the endowment fund. An associate membership is 
for such former students of the University, not graduates, as pay the 
associate membership dues. Such former students may also become 
associate-endowment members. The control of the affairs of the associa- 
tion is. in the hands of a board of ten directors. A general secretary is 
employed, whose office is at the University and who has charge of the 
publications of the association, and keeps, so far as possible, a complete 
record of facts concerning the alumni. The secretary is editor of the 
Graduate Magazine, which is sent monthly to all members of the associa- 
tion. The regular meetings of the association occur during commence- 
ment week of each year. 

The Graduate Club meets once a month. Its interests are social, lit- 
erary, and scientific. Its aim is to allow graduate students to become 
acquainted with each other and with each other's work. 

University Women's Association. The University Women's Associa- 
tion is composed of the women connected with the University as in- 
structors, librarians, or officials, and the wives of instructors. This 
organization gives a general reception at the opening of each academic 
year, maintains a scholarship for women, and in various other ways 
shows its practical interest in the affairs of the University. 

Women's Student Government Association. All women by registration 
in the University become members of this organization. The purpose of 
the organization, as stated in the constitution, is "to foster among the 
women a feeling of mutual responsibility and a high regard for both 
liberty and order, to maintain high standards of living and scholarship, 
and to promote loyalty to the University." 

The organization has power "to make all rules and regulations neces- 
sary to carry out the purpose for which it was organized; to regulate all 
matters pertaining to the conduct and welfare of women students; to aid 
and promote all student organizations and activities in which women 
students are concerned. Through its Executive Council it shall have 
power to act as a board of arbitration and make all needful regulations in 
case of trouble or disagreements between individual students or between 
different schools, classes or organizations, and through its Executive 
Council it may recommend its findings to the proper University body: 
Provided, that nothing in this constitution shall be construed so as to 
conflict with any regulations of any properly constituted University 
authority." 

(44) 



University Organizations. 45 

The officers are a president, two vice presidents, a secretary and a 
treasurer elected by the women of the University and two representatives 
from each of the classes. These officers form the Executive Council. 
There are, in addition, district chairmen and house presidents, elected by 
the groups of women over whom they preside. These officers meet with 
the Council at regular periods, assist the Council in various ways, and 
serve especially to maintain a close bond among the women students. 

This organization maintains a scholarship for self-supporting girls, 
and, in cooperation with its Faculty Advisory Committee and the 
Adviser of Women, serves in many ways to promote the interests of 
women students. 

The Men's Student Council was instituted by the men students of the 
University, April 20, 1909. The purpose of the Council is to draw the 
men of the University into closer relationship, to promote a closer union 
between the schools, to promote friendly relations between the faculty 
and the students, to provide for the general welfare of the students, to 
conduct campaigns for the support of the University, and to reflect the 
student sentiment in all matters whatsoever of concern to the students 
of the University. 

The Council is composed of members chosen by the male students of 
the University from their numbers, the following schools being repre- 
sented: the College, the School of Engineering, the School of Law, the 
School of Medicine, the School of Pharmacy, and the Graduate School. 
Each school is represented by one member for each one hundred students 
or major fraction thereof, but each school is entitled to at least one rep- 
resentative. In addition to the councilmen, there are chosen at each election 
a president, a vice president, and a secretary; the latter being elected at 
large by all of the male students of the University. 

RELIGIOUS. 

Young Men's Christian Association. This organization has a mem- 
bership of over five hundred. The various activities of the association 
are carried on by the members themselves, under a board of directors 
and a general secretary whose entire time is devoted to the work. 

In cooperation with the churches of Lawrence and the Christian and 
Presbyterian Bible chairs, the association offers a large number of Bible- 
study courses, under the leadership of University professors and ad- 
vanced students. Courses in the study of missions are also given. 

Through the courtesy of the University Bible chair and the Christian 
Women's Board of Missions, the association occupies quarters in Myers 
Hall. 

The association welcomes students at the opening of the University, 
aiding them in finding suitable rooming and boarding places. The em- 
ployment bureau, which is conducted jointly by the association and the 
University, renders all assistance possible to students desiring to earn 
a part of their expenses. During the summer months the employment 
bureau makes a canvass of the student district for rooms, and its infor- 
mation as to rooms and board is most complete. The association issues a 
student's handbook, giving valuable information to prospective students, 



46 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

which is ready for distribution about September 1, and will be sent free 
upon request. Address all correspondence to the general secretary. 

Young Women's Christian Association. This is an organization of 500 
University women, with a permanent sustaining membership of over 100 
faculty women and alumnae. The association employs a general secre- 
tary. The purpose of the association is fivefold: (1) to develop and 
deepen the spiritual and moral life of the young women of the University, 
and to bring to them the conception that no part of their life lies out- 
side of their religion; (2) to be the medium between the women students 
of the University and the churches of Lawrence; (3) to give practical aid 
to women students whenever they are in need of it; (4) to be one of the 
agencies to create the best social standards; (5) to train young women 
to become efficient workers in church and philanthropic organizations. 

Religious services are held weekly, on Tuesday afternoons, at 3, in 
Myers Hall. During the opening week of the fall term members of the 
association assist Freshman girls in registering and finding classrooms 
and rooming and boarding places. 

Information concerning employment for girls may be obtained by ap- 
plying to the general secretary. 

The Christian Church Bible Chair. April 1, 1901, the Women's Board 
of Missions of the Christian Church established a chair of Biblical in- 
struction. Myers Hall, erected at a cost of $40,000, affords commodious 
lecture rooms and offices, an assembly room seating five hundred, a library 
and museum of missions. 

There is no organic relation between the Bible chair and the Uni- 
versity. The privileges are offered to all students, and the instruction is 
nonsectarian. The purpose of the work is to give students a more inti- 
mate acquaintance with the Bible, and to render them assistance in their 
religious life. 

The courses in the Old and New Testaments include The History of the 
Jewish People, The Teaching of the Prophets, The Life of Christ, and 
The Life of Paul. Special courses are also offered in Christian Evi- 
dences, Comparative Religions, The Work of Preaching, and other lines 
of Christian thought and activity, as demanded. 

A library of 1,500 volumes on Bible study, missions, religion, Christian 
sociology, the Sunday school, and related subjects, is accessible to all. 

The present occupant of the chair is Arthur Braden, A. B. (Hiram 
College) , graduate of Auburn, N. Y., Theological Seminary, Ph. D. (Syra- 
cuse University). 

Westminster Association. In 1905, the Presbyterians of Kansas organ- 
ized Westminster Association for the purpose of offering Biblical in- 
struction to all students and affording pastoral care for Presbyterian stu- 
dents of the University. On October 7, 1910, Westminster Hall, the gift 
of W. W. Cockins, of Lawrence, was dedicated. The hall is well adapted 
to class work, and also affords a center for the social life of the students. 
In July, 1917, Rev. Franklin G. Dill, B. A. (Univ. of Chicago), Ph.D. 
(Leipsic), was elected Presbyterian University pastor. Mrs. Dill and a 
number of University professors are associated with him in the work. 

The following courses are offered: A four-year course in Bible His- 



University Organizations. 47 

tory; the Bible and Modern Science; the Lives and Doctrines of the 
Prophets; Pauline Theology; Missions and World Problems; Compara- 
tive Religions; the Sources of the Bible; and the Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

There is no organic connection with the University. The teaching is 
nonsectarian and without charge. All students are welcome to the 
social life of the hall. 

All correspondence relative to the work of the Westminster Associa- 
tion should be addressed to the Principal. 

City Churches. The churches of Lawrence unite in extending to the 
University students a cordial invitation to enter with them into Christian 
fellowship, and endeavor to make them feel that, irrespective of church 
membership, they are welcome to all the privileges which the church 
affords. To this end the various churches hold receptions for the stu- 
dents at the beginning of each year, the pastors preach special ser- 
mons from time to time, and the young people's societies arrange for 
social gatherings, to which students especially are invited. There are 
also organized, in the principal Sunday schools of the city, classes for 
University students, a number of these classes being in charge of Uni- 
versity professors. 

The First Methodist Church has a regularly appointed associate pas- 
tor, who gives his main attention to the students of his denomination. 
Several other churches appoint students each year to act as assistants to 
the local pastors. 

By these means the students are brought into close contact with the 
religious life of Lawrence. A religious census of the student body dur- 
ing the past few years shows that an average of eighty-seven percent 
of the students have religious preferences, sixty-three percent are 
church members, and that a large number are actively engaged in the 
work of the various churches and organizations connected therewith 
throughout the city. 

LITERARY. 

The Phi Beta Kappa Society. The Kansas Alpha Chapter of this so- 
ciety was organized in 1890. The object of the society is, primarily, the 
promotion of scholarship in the University. To this end, a portion of the 
members of the graduating class of the College, never to exceed one-sixth, 
who have made high records of scholarship in their University studies, 
are elected to membership. 

German Club. The membership of this club, which meets once in two 
weeks, consists of such students as have made sufficient progress in 
German to take active part in the programs. The object of the club 
is to furnish the student special opportunity to familiarize himself with 
the spoken language, and to promote an interest in all that is German. 
Musical, literary, and dramatic programs are rendered by the students. 
There are also talks and lectures by members of the faculty and outside 
speakers. The meetings are conducted exclusively in German. Each 
year a German play is given by students of the department. 

The Quill Club is the parent chapter of an intercollegiate organization 
of students and instructors especially interested in literary activities and 



48 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

literary criticism. Applicants for membership must submit manuscript 
for the approval of the club. 

The Associated Journalism Students are organized for the purpose of 
bringing in speakers from the ranks of active journalists, and in general 
of working for the advancement of the Department of Journalism. 

The English Club is composed of the instructors and advanced stu- 
dents in the Department of English, and meets bimonthly. 

The French Club. The instructors and students in the French Depart- 
ment compose the Cercle Francais, which meets once a week to present a 
brief literary program, reviews of articles in the leading French maga- 
zines, and reports on French topics. French only is used, as one of the 
chief objects of the club is to provide better opportunities than can be 
offered in the classroom for the practice of the spoken language. An- 
other opportunity for such practice is found in the French play, given 
towards the close of each year. 

The Greek Symposium consists of the instructors and students of the 
Greek Department, who meet once a month for the reading of papers and 
discussion of topics which are either too general or too special for class 
work. The meetings are held in the evening, at the home of one of the 
instructors, and the special program is followed by a social hour. 

The Spanish Club. The Ateneo has been formed on the same general 
lines as the French Club for those students who wish to acquire facility 
in the use of spoken Spanish. At its weekly meetings, besides programs 
of a literary character, news of the Spanish-speaking world is reported 
and discussed. The Spanish play gives further opportunity to acquire 
readiness in speaking. 

SCIENTIFIC. 

The Sigma Xi Society. The Iota chapter of this honorary scientific 
society was established at the University in 1890. The society confers 
the honor of election to membership upon instructors and students who 
have shown special aptitude along scientific lines, especially with regard 
to research work. This chapter holds monthly meetings for the reading 
and discussion of scientific papers, and is the center of scientific interests 
at the University. 

The Chemical Club is composed of the instructors and advanced stu- 
dents in the Department of Chemistry, and Chemical Engineers. Weekly 
meetings are held, and the programs include reports on research work by 
instructors and students, reports on scientific meetings and associations, 
reviews of new books and important articles in chemical journals, and 
notices of important inventions and new chemical processes. 

Civil Engineering Society. This is maintained by students, under the 
guidance of the instructors in the department. It holds monthly meet- 
ings and is frequently addressed by practicing engineers, besides main- 
taining a program of papers and discussions. 

University of Kansas Branch of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers. This is composed of instructors and students who are asso- 
ciated members or student members of the national organization. It holds 



University Organizations. 49 

biweekly meetings for the discussion of papers presented before the na- 
tional meetings of the association, for the review of current literature, 
and for addresses by practicing engineers. 

University of Kansas Student Section of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. This is essentially a student organization, under 
the supervision of an instructor who is a member of the national society. 
Weekly meetings are held for reports on current engineering 4iterature, 
with occasional addresses by practicing engineers. 

Affiliated Students' Society of the American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers. This is a society composed of Junior and Senior students and in- 
structors in the department, which enjoys the advantage of association 
with the institute. Meetings are held monthly for the discussion of the 
publications of the institute and the presentation of papers. Weekly 
department meetings in Mining Journal supplement the work of the 
society. 

The Architectural Engineering Society is a student organization under 
the supervision of the head of the department, who is a member of the 
American Institute of Architects. Biweekly meetings are held, at which 
illustrated lectures on allied subjects are given by faculty members or 
visiting architects; and papers presented by student members are dis- 
cussed by the organization. 

The Botany Club is composed of instructors and students of the de- 
partment of botany. It meets twice a month. 

The Snow Zoology Club is composed of instructors and advanced stu- 
dents of the department. It meets twice a month for the study and 
discussion of questions of general interest to the members, the aim be- 
ing more particularly to keep in touch with recent discoveries. 

The Mathematical Club is an organization of advanced students of the 
Department of Mathematics, with one faculty member elected by them 
as their official adviser. It meets twice a month to discuss mathemati- 
cal questions of general interest. 

The Entomology Club is composed of instructors and advanced stu- 
dents of the Department of Entomology. The meetings are held weekly, 
and are devoted to the presentation of researches conducted by the de- 
partment and to current advances as presented through the entomo- 
logical journals. Elections to membership are based on general Uni- 
versity scholarship and special proficiency in entomology. 

The Home Economics Club meets once a month. Its membership is 
elective. 

The Geology Club is composed of mining students and such College stu- 
dents as specialize in geology. It meets once in two weeks. 

The Pharmaceutical Society holds bimonthly meetings for the study of 
subjects especially related to the art of pharmacy, and for friendly inter- 
course. Its membership is drawn from students, faculty, and alumni of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

4_K. U.— 5419. 



50 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

debating. 

Debating Council. The Debating Council is made up of six members 
of the faculty, appointed by the Chancellor of the University, and two 
representatives from each of the two debating societies and the honorary 
debating fraternity. The Council has general supervision over all pre- 
liminary and interstate debates. 

CIVIC. 

The Jurisprudence Club meets every three weeks for the discussion of 
general questions of current interest. Its membership is elective. 

The International Polity Club is an organization of men students who 
are interested in the study and discussion of international problems. It 
is affiliated with a national organization of college polity clubs and is 
represented on the national council of the organization. The member- 
ship is elective and any student is eligible for election. 

The Woman's Forum meets twice a month to discuss public questions. 
Membership is informal, and the meetings are open to all women of the 
University. 

DRAMATIC. 

Dramatic Club. The students of the University maintain a dramatic 
club for the study and presentation of modern plays. Membership in 
the club is open to all students and is secured by try-outs held at stated 
intervals. 

The Blackfriars Club is an organization of those majoring in the De- 
partment of English. Plays of interest in connection with the history of 
the drama are given twice yearly. 

MUSICAL. 

Orchestra. The University supports an orchestra of forty instruments, 
under the direction of one of the faculty of the School of Fine Arts. The 
orchestra makes a study of the orchestral masterpieces, furnishe.3 music 
for University events, and gives two concerts annually. 

Women's Glee Club. The Women's Glee Club is under the direction of 
the head of the Department of Voice Training. Membership is competi- 
tive. An annual concert is given. 

Men's Glee Club. The Men's Glee Club is under the direction of the 
head of the Department of Voice Training of the School of Fine Arts. 
The general control of the club, as to financial obligations and tours, is 
in the hands of a committee of the University Senate. 

Band. The University Band is a permanent organization, fully uni- 
formed, and directed by a professional leader. The band furnishes 
music for the more important University gatherings and gives several 
concerts annually. 



University Organizations. 51 

public occasions. 

Convocation. At the opening of the fall semester, and occasionally 
during the year, convocations of the faculty and student body are held. 
At these gatherings speakers, either from the faculty or from abroad, 
discuss topics of general interest. The purpose of these meetings is to 
bring together all members of the University for instruction as well as 
for the development of a common spirit. 

Vesper Services. Religious exercises are held occasionally at 4:30 
Sunday afternoons. They are in charge of the Y. M. C. A. and the 
Y. W. C. A. The service is largely musical, though an address is often 
given. 

University Lectures. Whenever circumstances make them available, 
men of recognized standing in any field of science or art are secured 
to give addresses at the University. About ten such addresses arc given 
yearly. 

University Concerts. The University supports a series of concerts 
given by artists and organizations of the highest standing. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



ADMISSION. 

The requirements for admission of graduates of Kansas high schools 
to the various schools of the University have been fixed by legislative en- 
actment, which, by section 8875, General Statutes of 1915, provides that: 

"Any person who shall complete a four-year course of study in any 
high school accredited by the State Board of Education shall be entitled 
to admission to the Freshman class of the State University, the State 
Agricultural College, or any of the State Normal Schools, on presenting 
a statement containing a transcript of his high-school record, signed by 
the principal of the school, and certifying that such person has satisfac- 
torily completed said course of study." 

For the guidance of prospective students who do not come under the 
provisions of the law, and who desire to prepare themselves for admission 
to any of the schools of the University, statements of entrance require- 
ments will be found in the special sections of the catalog pertaining to 
these schools. 

Entrance Requirements. 

Candidates for admission who are not graduates of accredited Kansas 
high schools may offer themselves for examination in subjects required 
for admission. 

These examinations will be given only during the first and the last 
week of the first semester and the last week of the second semester. Ap- 
plications should be made to the Committee on Entrance Examinations, 
room 202, Blake Hall, by the Friday preceding, and should give the 
applicant's name, Lawrence address, and telephone number. 

Admission of Special Students. 

Special students are admitted to the various schools of the University 
upon conditions prescribed by the faculties. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

The regulations governing admisssion to advanced standing in the 
schools of the University are administered by a committee of the Uni- 
versity Senate, which examines into the merits of each case presented 
to it, and either credits the applicant with a certain rank or recommends 
him to the heads of departments for advanced credit or examination. 

Application for advanced standing should be made as early as possi- 
ble. Students who expect to present credits for advanced standing will 
save much time and annoyance for themselves if they will forward their 
credentials as early as possible to the secretary of the Advanced Stand- 
ing Committee. These credentials must include official transcripts of 

(52) 



General Information. 53 

preparatory school records and college records, and a certificate of hon- 
orable dismissal from the college or university attended. These cre- 
dentials should be sent to the secretary shortly after the end of the 
spring semester if the applicant intends to enter the University in the 
fall. They should be sent, at the very latest, three weeks before the 
opening of the University in the fall. The Advanced Standing Commit- 
tee can furnish no estimate of advanced standing credit to prospective 
students unless the credentials indicated above are sent to the commit- 
tee. The committee cannot consider applications for advanced standing 
which are made later than thirty days after matriculation. 

If the applicant for advanced standing should be required to take an 
examination in any subject which he presents for advanced standing 
credit, this examination must be taken not later than the sixth week 
of his first semester in the University. 

No advanced standing credit will be given for work done during a 
four-year course of study in a high school, academy, or preparatory 
school. 

The maximum advanced standing credit for work done in a junior 
college is sixty hours. In no case will work done in a junior college be 
credited as work of the Junior or Senior year in the University. 

Advanced standing credit is entirely provisional and may be with- 
drawn in whole or in part if the subsequent record of the student in 
the University shows that his scholarship and attainments do not justify 
the credits given at the time of his entrance. This provisional advanced 
standing rating will not become permanent nor be entered upon the books 
of the University until the student, by the successful completion of a 
year's work, has satisfied the Dean of the school concerned that his rat- 
ing is justified. 

All inquiries and correspondence concerning advanced standing should 
be addressed to E. F. Engel, secretary Advanced Standing Committee, 
University of Kansas. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission having certificates from accredited schools 
and all students of the University intending to pursue their studies dur- 
ing the ensuing year must present themselves for registration at the 
University on September 15, 16, 17,. 1919. Registration at a later date 
vnll be permitted only on the payment of a fee of one dollar. 

ENROLLMENT. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar and fees 
have been paid, students should apply to the Dean of the school to which 
they desire admission for enrollment in their classes. Enrollment the 
first semester occurs September 16, 17, 1919, and on the first day of the 
second semester. Enrollment at a later date will be permitted only 
on the payment of a fee of one dollar. 



54 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

examinations and reports. 

Final Examinations are held for all students during the last week of 
each semester. 

Special Examinations will be given only during examination weeks and 
during the opening week of the fall semester. All requests for special 
examinations must be approved by the Dean. 

Dismissal. Absence from examination or failure in more than one- 
third of his work in any one semester severs a student's connection with 
the University. 

Withdrawals. A student may be withdrawn from a class by the Dean, 
with the consent of his instructor. Honorable withdrawals will be per- 
mitted only when the student's work in the subject is of passing grade. 

Whenever a student is failing in part of his work the Dean may, at his 
discretion, withdraw him from one or more of the classes in which he is 
failing and give him a failure in such subjects. 

Grades. The letter A is reserved for work of marked excellence, and 
indicates high honor. The letter B indicates very good work, of much 
more than average quality. The letter C indicates that the work has 
been of good average character, better than that which deserves merely 
to pass. The letter D indicates work the lowest in quality that would 
enable a student to pursue, without undue lack of material or of method, 
the next dependent course, whether the latter be in the same department 
or in a related department. The letter I indicates that work is in- 
complete. The letter F indicates failure. 

Incomplete and Failure. The work of a student who fails to appear for 
final examination is graded I or F, according as his class standing has 
been of passing grade or below passing grade. Work that has been of 
passing quality, some part of which is for good reason unfinished, is also 
graded I. 

Grade I may be removed by special examination, but unless properly 
removed before the beginning of the corresponding semester of the fol- 
lowing year it becomes a failure, and the student must reenroll in the 
course. 

Grade F may be removed only by such reenrollment. 

Inadequate Preparation. When students show by their current work 
insufficient entrance preparation in any study they may be required to 
make good such deficiency in any manner prescribed by their instructors. 

EXPENSES OF Sf UDENTS 

Fees. 

Students are required to pay fees as scheduled below. In all cases, 
the matriculation fee is paid but once — at the time the student first regis- 
ters in any school of the University. The incidental fee is payable in 
full each year at registration. 



General Information. 55 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10.00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 10.00 

for nonresidents 20 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5 . 00 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10.00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 10.00 

for nonresidents 20 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5.00 

SCHOOL OF LAW. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 25.00 

for nonresidents 35 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5.00 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents ." 10.00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state... 25.00 

for nonresidents 35 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5.00 

Students taking the regular four years in pharmacy are registered 
during the first two years in both the School of Pharmacy and the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and may pay the College incidental 
fee so long as their work is confined to courses offered in the College. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents • 10 . 00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 25.00 

for nonresidents 35 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5.00 

(For special fees for clinical work, see section VIII.) 

During the first year of the regular four years in medicine students 
are registered in both the School of Medicine and the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences, and will pay the College incidental fee. During 
the succeeding years they will pay the incidental fee o f the School of 
Medicine. 

A student taking two-thirds or more of his work in the School of 
Pharmacy or the School of Medicine is considered a student of that 
school in which he takes the work, and will be required to pay the 
regular tuition in full: $25 for residents of the state, and, $35 for non- 
residents. This applies in particular to all College students who elect 
the major part of their work in the School of Pharmacy or the School of 
Medicine. 

A student who is enrolled for less than two-thirds of his work in either 
school will be required to pay, in addition to the regular incidental fee 
required by the College, a pro rata professional school incidental fee 



56 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

of fifty cents for each hour in which he is enrolled. This has special 
application to College students who are taking the major part of their 
work in the Colllege and have paid the incidental fee required by the 
College, but who desire to elect certain courses in the School of Phar- 
macy or the School of Medicine. 

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5.00 

GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 10.00 

for nonresidents 20 . 00 

Diploma fee, for each degree 5 . 00 

SUMMER SESSION. 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state (6 or 10 

weeks) $10 . 00 

for nonresidents 15 . 00 

for 4-weeks session, one-half of the above. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 10.00 

for nonresidents 20 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5.00 

CORRESPONDENCE DEPARTMENT. 
Incidental fee, for residents of the state, any school. . $10.00 
for nonresidents of the state, any school, 15 . 00 

A fee of $6 annually is required of each student to cover the expense 
of maintaining the general health of the University body. 

Late registration and late enrollment in class also require a fee of $1. 

Announcements of laboratory and shop fees will be found under such 
courses as require them. 

Living Expenses. 

Information concerning the location of rooming and boarding places 
may be had from the secretary of the University Y. M. C. A., or at the 
office of the Registrar. 

The average price of board, rooms, light, and fuel may be placed at 
from $6 to $12 a week. Day board in private families and at city 
restaurants may be obtained for $5.50 to $7 a week. Day board in clubs 
varies from $5.50 to $7.00 a week. Furnished rooms, usually occupied 
by two students, range from $4 to $15 a month. Unfurnished rooms rent 
for $1.50 to $3 a month. Students who can supply their own furniture 
and buy and prepare provisions for the table can lessen expenses ma- 
terially. 

The following table shows the estimated expenses of a student of the 
University for a year, excluding clothing and traveling expenses; the 



General Information. 57 

expense varies with the course pursued, and also depends, naturally, 
upon the tastes and habits of the student: 

Board $220 . 00 to $280 . 00 

Room 20 . 00 to 60 . 00 

Books and stationery 8.00 to 40.00 

Laundry 8.00 to 30.00 

Matriculation and other fees 15.00 to 30.00 

Incidentals 15 . 00 to 50 . 00 

Totals $286.00 to $510.00 

The estimated expenses for students in the Medical, Law, and Phar- 
macy schools of the University are included in the second table because 
of the higher incidental fee. 

PRIZES AND AIDS. 

The William J. Bryan Prize is derived from the income of $250 which 
was presented to the University by Mr. Bryan in 1898, upon the condi- 
tion that the proceeds should be used for "a prize for the best essay dis- 
cussing the principles which underlie our form of government." The 
prize is offered in alternate years. The details of the contest are in- 
trusted by the faculty of the College to a special committee. Awarded 
1917-'18 to Edward S. Mason, a Junior in the College. 

The Hattie Elizabeth Lewis Memorial Prizes were established in 1911, 
in memory of Hattie Elizabeth Lewis, a former student of the Univer- 
sity. They are open to all students of the University, and have since 
191 i been given annually for the best essays on some phase of the gen- 
eral theme, "The Application of the Teachings of Jesus to the Practical 
Affairs and Relations of Life." They have amounted to $250 annually. 
Awards in 1918: First to James Armstrong Scott, a Junior in the Col- 
lege; second to Myrtle Sopher, a Senior in the College; third and fourth, 
not awarded in 1918. 

University Fellowships to the number of seventeen have been estab- 
lished for graduates of the University of Kansas and of other recognized 
colleges and universities who have distinguished themselves for scholar- 
ship. These fellowships are of $280 each. 

University Fellowships for Graduates of Kansas Colleges, ten in num- 
ber, are offered yearly. These fellowships also amount to $280 each, 
and one is offered to each of ten Kansas colleges chosen from year to year 
by the administrative committee of the Graduate School. 

The Charles S. Griffin Memorial Scholarship was established in 1910 
by Mrs. Mary Griffin, in memory of her son. The interest on $1,000 is 
awarded annually to a student of the College. 

The Marcella Howland Memorial Scholarship of ninety dollars was 
established in 1900, by Mrs. Marcia Brown Howland, in memory of her 
daughter. It is open to young women of the Junior and Senior classes 
in the College. Held in 1918-'19 by Fanny Virginia McCall. 

The Frances Schlegel Carruth Scholarship in German was established 
in 1909, in memory of Frances Schlegel Carruth. It is a Freshman 



58 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

scholarship of one hundred dollars, awarded to the graduate of the Law- 
rence high school who passes the best examination in two years' entrance 
German. Held in 1918-'19 by Jennie B. Glendinning. 

The Women's Student Government Association Scholarship of fifty dol- 
lars was established in 1910. It is open to young women of the Fresh- 
man class for use in the Sophomore year. Held in 1918-'19 by Gladys 
Sweigart. 

The University Women's Association Scholarship of one hundred dol- 
lars was established in 1915. Held in 1918-'19 by Laura Louise Jackson. 

The Eliza Matheson Innes Memorial Scholarship of one hundred dol- 
lars was established in 1911, by Mr. George Innes, in honor of his wife. 
It is open to women students of the College above the Freshman year, or 
to women students of the Graduate School. Held in 1918-'19 by Helen 
Hart. 

The Caroline Mumford Winston Memorial Scholarship of thirty-five 
dollars was established in 1912, by Mr. Thomas Winston, in memory of 
his wife. It is open to women students of the College above the Fresh- 
man year, or to women students of the Graduate School. Held in 1918- 
'19 by Alberta George White.* 

The Kansas Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae estab- 
lished a scholarship of seventy dollars in 1912. It is open to women stu- 
dents of the College above the Freshman year, or to women students of 
the Graduate School. Held in 1918-'19 by Laura Ellen Bell. 

The Kansas City Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae 
established in 1914 two scholarships. These are loans of seventy-five 
dollars each, for five years without interest. Open to Junior and Senior 
women students from Kansas City, Kansas or Missouri. 

The Lucinda Smith Buchan Memorial Scholarship was established in 
1900 in memory of Lucinda Smith, A. B., 1890, by the alumnae members 
of the Pi Beta Phi Sorority. It is a loan of two hundred dollars for two 
years without interest, open to the young women of the Junior and 
Senior classes in the College. Held in 1918-'19 by Luella Varner. 

The Frank Egbert Bryant Memorial Scholarship of fifty dollars is 
open to women students of the College. Held in 1918-'19 by Edith Idella 
Hess. 

The Mrs. J. B. Watkins Scholarship of fifty dollars was established in 
1915. It is awarded to a young woman of the Freshman class. 

Governor Arthur Capper has given a scholarship in the sum of fifty 
dollars. It is open to* Freshman students in the School of Fine Arts. 

Mrs. John T. Stuart, of Wellington, has given a scholarship in the sum 
of fifty dollars. It is open to Freshman students in the School of Fine 
Arts. 

The Daughters of the American Revolution Scholarship was estab- 
lished in 1912 by the Betty Washington Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. It is a loan of one hundred dollars without inter- 

* Deceased. 



General Information. 59 

est for three years after graduation, and open to young women of the 
Senior class. Held in 1918-'19 by Mary Elizabeth Larson. 

The Student Loan Fund was established in July, 1894, by the gradu- 
ating class in College and Engineering of that year. It has increased 
through donations frpm subsequent classes and from private individuals 
until it amounts to about $4,000. By the terms of the gift sums not to 
exceed $100 may be loaned on bankable notes at four percent interest to 
students above the Freshman year. 

The James L. Mead Loan Fund of $1,000 is held in trust on the same 
terms as those under which the student loan fund is operated. 

An Aid Fund has been established for the assistance of worthy women 
students. 

Employment. The University, through the Young Men's and the 
Young Women's Christian Associations, maintains an employment bu- 
reau. The secretaries of these associations may be addressed by stu- 
dents desiring employment. 

ROOMING HOUSES. 

Approved Rooming Houses for Men. Lists may be had from the Reg- 
istrar, or the Secretary of the University Y. M. C. A., on application. 

Approved Rooming Houses for Women. The University attempts to 
secure the best housing conditions available for its women students, 
through a committee under whose direction a list of rooming houses for 
women is prepared each year. The sanitary and social conditions of each 
house are investigated before it is placed on the approved list. Students 
are expected to room only in houses that are on this list. This list, to- 
gether with regulations governing rooming places, may be had from 
the Adviser of Women. By action of the Board of Administration, occu- 
pancy of rooms by women students shall be subject at all times to the 
approval of the Adviser of Women ; further, women students are not per- 
mitted to lodge in houses in which men also lodge, unless for special 
reasons the rule is waived by the Adviser. The University expects stu- 
dents to keep their rooms for at least one semester or to make changes 
only on recommendation of the Adviser. 

House Customs. The following customs have been adopted by the 
women of the University as organized in the Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association: 

I. Rooming houses for women should be closed not later than 10 p. m. 
every night in the week, except when entertainments of general interest 
are held, and on Friday and Saturday nights, when the closing hour is 11. 

II. Students' parties should be held on Friday or Saturday nights, or 
on nights preceding holidays, and on holidays. 

III. Social engagements should not be made for the evenings of school 
days, except for Friday evenings, or for evenings preceding holidays, and 
on holidays. 

Miss Alberta L. Corbin, acting Adviser of Women, exercises general 
supervision over all houses where women live, and gives general and in- 
dividual attention to the needs of women students. She invites corre- 
spondence with parents and guardians with regard to the welfare of 
women students. 



60 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

student health. 

The University Health Service has been established for the purpose 
of safeguarding the health of students. To accomplish this, its ac- 
tivities are carried on along three general lines: education, through lec- 
tures, publications and exhibits; sanitation, through supervising the 
students' environment both on and off the campus; and personal ex- 
amination and advice. 

Thorough physical examinations will be made of all students entering 
the University. The result of each examination is recorded and serves 
as a basis in determining the nature of exercise which the department of 
physical education will assign to the student. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN RELATION TO WAR SERVICE. 

STUDENT ARMY TRAINING CORPS. 

I. — Collegiate Section 

On the announcement of the War Department's intention to establish 
Student Army Training Corps in the institutions of higher learning, 
the University undertook the preparations necessary for this new work. 

Authorization was received to continue courses in Medicine, Engineer- 
ing, and Law, and to organize courses in Chemical Warfare Service. 
Later, curricula in Pharmacy and Premedical studies were authorized. 

For the men who were to prepare for positions as officers in infantry, 
artillery, aviation, ordnance and quartermaster corps, and the navy, 
the following courses were made out by the respective departments : As- 
tronomy, Biology, Chemistry, English, Free-hand Drawing, Elementary 
French, Advanced French, Elementary German, Advanced German, In- 
ternational Law, Mathematics, Meteorology, Military Geography, Military 
Law, Military Map Reading, Physics, Wireless Telegraphy, Elementary 
Psychology, Advanced Psychology, Sanitation, and Hygiene. In addition 
there was offered, under the name "Issues of the War," a course which 
was required of practically all S. A. T. C. students except those in the 
School of Medicine. This course on the Issues of the War was composed 
of four different parts, each requiring three months for its completion. 
Part I dealt with the causes of the war and America's entry into it. 
Part II treated of political science problems involved. Part III treated 
of the economic problems involved. Part IV treated of the philosophical 
considerations underlying the German attitude in the war. So far as 
practicable, students were allowed their choice as to which of these parts 
of the course they would pursue during the first quarter. 

Students were given their choice of courses with the following limita- 
tions: Students above Freshman standing and those twenty years old or 
older should have first choice, students nineteen years old were given 
next choice, and students eighteen years old last choice. The reason for 
this apparent discrimination was that announcement had been made 
by the War Department that in all probability twenty-year-old men would 



General Information. 61 

be allowed to remain in college one quarter, nineteen-jrear-old men two 
quarters, and eighteen-year-old men three quarters. 

Under the above limitations the enrollment by schools was as follows : 
Engineering School, 911; College, 737; School of Medicine, 114; School 
of Law, 34; School of Pharmacy, 18. Not all of the above men were 
inducted into the S. A. T. C, but all were taking courses approved by 
the War Department Committee. Some were rejected on physical ex- 
amination and others were never transferred from reserve corps, such 
as the Medical Enlisted Reserve Corps, to the S. A. T. C. 

The total number inducted into the S. A. T. C. was 1,689. Of these, 
10 lost their lives during the epidemic of influenza which closed all 
class work in the S. A. T. C. from October 8 to November 11. Of the 
others, 81 were sent to officers' training camp for infantry, 59 to officers' 
training camp for field artillery, 20 to officers' training camp for coast 
artillery, and 9 to training school for marines. The remaining 1,510, of 
whom 255 were in the navy section, were in the corps at the time of de- 
mobilization, December 21. 

II. — Vocational Section. 

Shortly after the entrance of the United States into war with Germany 
it became apparent to the War Department that the army would need 
skilled artisans in numbers larger than could conveniently be obtained 
through voluntary enlistment or through the machinery of the draft. As 
a result of this demand the Committee on Education and Special Train- 
ing was appointed and authorized to arrange with che schools and uni- 
versities for the training of men in such trades as were of direct appli- 
cation to the needs of the army. 

The University of Kansas was asked to help in training skilled 
artisans for the army, and the work was started on June 15, 1918. 
Following the plan of the committee to give intensive vocational courses 
eight weeks in length, the University trained 250 soldiers between June 
15 and August 15. The number of men sent to the University for the 
second contingent was 350; and in the last contract it was agreed to train 
four groups of 400 men each between October 15, 1918, and June 15, 
1919. At the time the work was stopped owing to the signing of the 
armistice, the University had granted certificates to 957 men. 

The majority of work was given under direction of the School of 
Engineering, but the training of radio operators and telegraphers was 
in charge of the Department of Physics of the College. 

III.— War Work for Women. 

The University made the same provision as in 1917-'18 to afford women 
students the opportunity to help in war work or to prepare themselves 
for government work or for public usefulness of some other kind. The 
University Red Cross workroom was opened at the beginning of the year. 
A Pre-nursing Course was arranged at the request of the Committe on 
War Service Training for Women College Students of the American 
Council on Education. A regular University course in Home Nursing was 



62 Annual Catalog, University of Kansas. 

also offered. Special efforts were made to provide preparation for 
government positions in scientific work. 

It was the intention to carry on arrangements of this kind throughout 
the year. But the close of the war ended the necessity for many of these 
provisions and allowed the University to return all its resources to their 
usual functions. 



SECTION II 

Graduate School 

(63) 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., Chancellor of the University, and President of 
the Faculty. 

Frank W. Blackmar, Ph. D., Dean of the Graduate School, and Pro- 
fessor of Sociology. 

James W. Green, A. M,, Professor of Law. 

Edgar H. S. Bailey, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

Alexander M. Wilcox, Ph. D., Professor of Greek Language and Litera- 
ture. 

Lucius E. Sayre, Ph. M., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Charles G. Dunlap, Litt. D., Professor of English Literature. 

Carl A. Preyer, Mus. D., Professor of Piano and Composition. 

Olin Templin,* A. M., Professor of Philosophy. 

Edwin M. Hopkins, Ph. D., Professor of Rhetoric and English Language. 

Frank H. Hodder, Ph. M., Professor of American History andj Political 
Science. 

Erasmus Haworth. Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Arthur T. Walker, Ph. D., Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

William C. Stevens, M. S., Professor of Botany. 

Arvin S. Olin, LL. D., Professor of Education. 

William A. Griffith, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Eugenie Galloo, A. M., Professor of Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

William L. Burdick, Ph. D., Professor of Law. 

Charles S. Skilton, A. B., Professor of Organ, Theory of Music, and 
Music History. 

Ida H. Hyde, Ph. D., Professor of Physiology. 

William H. Johnson, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Samuel J. Hunter, A. M., Professor of Entomology. 

Perley F. Walker, M. M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Mervin T. Sudler, M. D., Professor of Surgery, 

L. D. Havenhill, Ph. M., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Frederick E. Kester, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

George C. Shadd, E. E., Professor of Physics. 

Hamilton P. Cady, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Herbert A. Rice, C. E., Professor of Mathematics and Structural En- 
gineering. 

Bennet M. Allen, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

Edmund H. Hollands, Ph. D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Henry W. Humble, J. D., Professor of Law. 

Edward D. Osborn,* Professor of Law. 

Frank B. Dains, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 

(65) 
5— K. U.— 5419. 



66 The Graduate School. 

Clement C. Williams, C. E., Professor of Railway Engineering. 

Elmer F. Engel, A. M., Professor of German. 

John N. Van der Vries,* Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Ralph H. Major,* M. D., Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 

William B. Downing, Professor of Voice and Public-school Music. 

Elizabeth C. Sprague, Professor of Home Economics. 

Raphael D. O'Leary, A. B., Professor of Rhetoric. 

Raymond A. Schwegler, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Arthur J. Boynton, A. M., Professor of Economics. 

Charles H. Ashton, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Arthur C. Terrill, A. M., Professor of Mining. 

Harold L. Butler, A. B., Professor of Voice. 

Arthur Nevin, Professor of Ensemble and Music Extension. 

Harry C. Thurnau, Ph. D., Professor of German. 

Frederick J. Kelly, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

Raymond A. Kent, A. M., Professor of Education. 

David L. Patterson, B. S., Professor of European History. 

William A. Whitaker,* A. M., Professor of Metallurgy. 

Leon N. Flint, A. B., Professor of Journalism. 

Frederick H. Sibley, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

George E. Coghill, Ph. D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Ole O. Stoland, Pb. D., Professor of Physiology. 

Walter S. Hunter, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

William M. Hekking, B. P., Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Noble P. Sherwood, A. M., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Arthur L. Owen, A. M., Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

Miles W. Sterling, A. M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Hannah Oliver, A M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Selden L. Whitcomb. A. M., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Martin E. Rice, M. S., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Louis E. Sisson, A. M., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

Alberta L. Corbin, Ph. D., Associate Professor of German. 

William J. Baumgartner, A. M., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Henry O. Kruse, A. M., Associate Professor of German. 

Clarence C. Crawford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of History. 

Earl W. Murray,* A. B., Associate Professor of Latin. 

William S. Johnson, Ph. D., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Victor E. Helleberg, A. B., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Margaret Lynn,* A. M., Associate Professor of English Literature, 

Elise Neuen Schwander, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Herman C. Allen, A. M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

William W. Davis, Ph. D.,* Associate Professor of American History. 

C. Ferdinand Nelson, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Physiological 
Chemistry. 

Ulysses G. Mitchell, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, 

Alfred H. Sluss, B. S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Floyd C. Dockeray, Ph. D.,* Associate Professor of Psychology. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 



The Graduate School. 67 

Herbert W. Nutt, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Joseph G. Brandt, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Herbert B. Hungerford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Manuel C. Elmer, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Raymond C. Moore, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Geology and Paleontol- 
ogy. 

Ralph E. Carter, A. M., Associate Professor of Education. 

Ellis B. Stouffer, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Edwin F. Stimpson, B. S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

James E. Todd, A. M., Assistant Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Albert M. Sturtevant, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of German. 

Lulu Gardner, A. B., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

Clifford C. Young,* A. B., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

William R. B. Robertson, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Theodore T. Smith, A. M., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Paul V. Faragher,* Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Walter S. Long, A. M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Nadine Nowlin, A. M., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

George W. Stratton,* Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

William M. Duffus, A. M., Assistant Professor Economics. 

Grace M. Charles, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Jacob 0. Jones, M. C. E., Assistant Professor of Hydraulics. 

Blaine F. Moore,* Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Josephine Burnham, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Frank E. Melvin, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of European History. 

William L. Eikenberry, B. S., Assistant Professor of the Teaching of 
Biological Sciences. 

Frederick W. Bruckmiller,* A.M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Amida Stanton, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Solomon Lefschetz, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Richard Leonidas Grider, Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

Winthrop P. Haynes,* Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mineralogy and 
Petrology. 

John Ise, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Clarence Estes, B. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

George Hermann Derry, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Walter B. Bodenhafer;* A. M\, Instructor in Sociology. 

E. Lee Treece, A. B., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Cornelia M. Downs, A. B., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 



68 The Graduate School. 

administrative committee. 

Frank H. Hodder. Arvin S. Olin. 

S. L. Whitcomb. H. P. Cady. 

UNIVERSITY FELLOWS, 1918-'19. 

♦Armstrong, Beulah May, A. B. '17, Baker; A.M. '18, University of Kansas. 

Alvord, Lesta Blossom, A. B. '18, Emporia. — English. 
♦Buffington, Ralph Mulvaney, A. B. '17, University of Kansas. — Chemistry. 

Bookwalter, Lulu G., A. B. '08, Otterbein. — Education. 
♦Crawford, Agnes Teefer, A. B. '16, University of Kansas. — Romance Languages. 
♦Cameron, Anna, A. B. '17, Southwestern; A.M. '18, University of Kansas. — Bac- 
teriology. 

Fackler, Harry B., A. B. '17. — Entomology. 

Gaskill, Gussie Esther, A. B. '17, University of Kansas. — History. 
♦Hadlev, Jas. Wilbut, A. B. '18, University of Kansas. — Education. 

♦Higgcns, Elizabeth May, A. B. '17, Ottawa University; A. B. '18, Mt. Holyoke. — 
Germanic Languages and Literature. 

Hoover, John H., B. S. '16, McPherson. — Education. 
♦Marm, Anna, A. B. '09, Bethany College; A.M. '18, University of Kansas. — Mathe- 
matics. 
♦McCreath, Frances. 

McNaught, A. M. '17, University of Kansas. — Bacteriology. 
♦Olander, Clifford Paul, B. S. '18, Washburn College. — Chemistry. 

Rickard, Marjorie Adeline, A. B. '18 University, of Kansas. — Romance Languages. 
♦Robertson, Geo. Wm., A. B. '18, Cornell University. — -History. 
♦Van Arsdale, Mary, A. B. '18, University of Kansas. — Home Economics. 

Vogt, Alice Nadine, A. B. '17, McPherson; A. M. '18, University of Kansas. — Sociology. 
♦Whitaker, Ruth, A. B. '17, Washburn College. — History. 



FELLOWS FROM KANSAS COLLEGES. 

Buckner, Alice H., A. B. '18, Fairmount College. — Home Economics. 

Collins, Elizabeth Beulah, A. B. '18, Ottawa University. — English. 

Dysinger, Frances Helen, A. B. '18, Midland College. — English. 
""Graves, Lawrence Murray, A. B. '18, Washburn College. — Mathematics. 

McGaffey, Mary Edith, A. B. '18, McPherson College. — Education. 

Palmquist, Ethel Dorthea, A. B. '18, Bethany College. — English. 

Smith, Florence, A. B. '18, Baker University. — Chemistry. 
'Thompson, Daisy Ruth, A. B. '18, Cooper College. — Chemistry. 

Tibbals, Gladys Louise, A. B. '18, Emporia College. — Romance Languages. 
k White, Paul H., A. B. '18, Friends University. 
*White, Harold Ogden, A. B. '18, Southwestern College. — English. 

Winn, Edith, A. B. '18, Southwestern. — English. 

♦ Resigned. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 



The Graduate School was organized in 1896-'97, for the purpose of giv- 
ing opportunity for students to pursue advanced work, and to encourage 
independent and scientific investigation. Courses of study for advanced 
degrees are offered in all of the schools of the University, nearly every 
department being represented. Through the Graduate School all the 
advanced degrees of the University are granted. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Admission to the Graduate School ordinarily is granted to graduates 
of this University holding the bachelor's degree, and to graduates of 
other colleges and universities of good standing on presentation of proper 
evidence of scholarship and testimonials of good character. 

REGISTRATION. 

Students wishing to register should first apply to the Dean of the 
Graduate School. When it is ascertained in what department the stu- 
dent desires to do his major work, the Dean will refer him to the head 
of that department, who will select the courses, after consultation with 
the student. The student will then submit the courses to the Dean, and 
if they are approved the applicant will be given a card permitting him to 
register in the office of the Registrar. Work to be counted as graduate 
work is specified in the Catalog, and must be designated as graduate 
on the enrollment card filed in the Registrar's office. . 

DEGREES GRANTED. 

Academic Degrees: Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

Professional^ Degrees : Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Mining 
Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Master of Science in 
Education. 

The Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and 
Master of Science. 

When the candidate for the master's degree has selected the depart- 
ment in which his major work is to be done, the head of that department, 
in consultation with the candidate, approves his work for the master's 
degree, which may be confined to the department of the major study or 
may be selected from that and not more than two other departments. 
The decision of the head of the department is subject to the veto of the 
Dean of the Graduate School, but appeal may be made from the decision 
of the Dean to the Graduate Faculty. The head of the major depart- 
ment approves the courses selected for each semester on a card provided 
for the same, which is kept on file at the Dean's office. If the student 
.subsequently changes his selection of a major department, the graduate 
work already done cannot be counted toward the master's degree unless 
approved by the head of the new major department. 

The master's degree will be granted only after at least one full year's 
graduate work. The candidate must have completed with high credit 
thirty hours of work chosen from the courses open to graduates, pub- 
lished in the catalog, or approved by the departments concerned and the 

(69) 



70 The Graduate School. 

administrative committee. Courses for which a professional degree is 
given will not be counted toward this degree. Not more than sixteen 
hours' credit can be given in one term. 

Ordinarily each candidate for the master's degree is required to present 
a thesis to the head of the major department. The thesis must embody 
the results of scholary research on some topic connected with the candi- 
date's major study. The thesis must be completed and given to the head 
of the department under whose direction it has been done, not later 
than May 15 preceding the June in which the candidate expects to receive 
his degree. After examining the thesis, the head of the department shall 
report its acceptance to the Registrar and deposit the thesis in the office 
of the Dean of the Graduate School. The thesis must be typewritten and 
bound in cloth. In special cases, where it seems advisable for the candi- 
date to devote all of his time to regular class work, not involving re- 
search, on the recommendation of the head of the department and the 
consent of the Dean, the requirement of a thesis may be waived. 

Ordinarily the candidate for the master's degree is expected to spend 
a minimum of one year in resident graduate work at some university, 
the latter half of which at least must be done in residence at the Uni- 
versity of Kansas. These regulations permit the acceptance of graduate 
work done in other institutions to the extent of not more than half of 
the work, but all credits offered are subject to the approval of the ad- 
ministrative committee. 

Engineering Degrees. 

Graduates in engineering in this University, and masters of science 
who have received their degrees through the Graduate Faculty, having 
majored in engineering, are eligible to the professional degree of civil 
engineer, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, mining engineer, or 
chemical engineer, whichever is appropriate to the undergraduate courses 
taken. Candidates for these degrees must have spent at least three years' 
actual time in professional practice, in positions of responsibility, in de- 
sign, construction or operation of engineering works, and must furnish 
detailed and satisfactory evidence as to the nature and extent of this 
practice. 

Each must submit an engineering thesis, accompanied by detailed ex- 
planations, drawings, specifications, estimates, etc., and embodying the 
results of their own work or observation. If approved, the thesis and all 
accompanying material become the property of the University. 

All theses for professional degrees must be delivered to the Dean of 
the School of Engineering on or before the 15th day of May. 

Doctor of Philosophy. 

The degree of doctor of philosophy will be granted for advanced 
scholarship, and the performance of independent work in some special 
line, under the following conditions: 

1. The candidate must be a baccalaureate graduate of some college or 
university of good standing; and he must give satisfactory evidence to the 
Faculty of the Graduate School that he possesses an adequate preparation 
for graduate work. 

2. He must make application to the Dean of the Graduate School be- 
fore the 1st day of October preceding the commencement at which he in- 
tends to present himself for the degree, and must then give satisfactory 
evidence of his ability to read such German and French as may be neces- 
sary for the proper prosecution of his studies. 

3. He must have spent at least three full college years in resident 
graduate work at this or some other approved university the last year of 
which he must have spent as a resident student of this University. The 
time spent in attaining the degree of A. M. may be counted toward satis- 
fying this time condition. 



Fellowships. 71 

4. He must present a thesis showing the result of original research 
of a high character, and must pass acceptable examinations, both written 
and oral, in one chief or major study and two allied, subsidiary or minor 
studies, not more than two of which may be in the same department. The 
oral examination is given before the Faculty of the Graduate School, 
where the candidate may be required to defend his thesis. This thesis, 
embodying the results of original research in some subject connected with 
his major study, must be presented to the head of the department in which 
the work was done, not later than the 1st of May preceding the com- 
mencement at which the degree is to be conferred, and if approved by 
him it is placed on file for inspection in the office of the Dean of the 
Graduate School for at least two weeks. If the thesis is finally approved, 
the candidate must, before receiving the degree, deliver at least fifty 
printed copies of it to the Librarian of the University, or give proper 
security for the printing of that number; but if the thesis has already 
been printed, ten copies only need be deposited with the Librarian. 

UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS. 

General Fellowships. 

For the encouragement of advanced study and research, the University 
of Kansas has established seventeen fellowships for graduates of special 
merit. Each fellowship entitles the holder to $300. Fellows are expected 
to devote their time to investigation and research leading to an advanced 
degree, except that they may be required to give not exceeding six hours 
of educational service per week in the department to which they are 
assigned. These fellowships are awarded to graduates of the University 
of Kansas, and of other colleges and universities of good standing, who 
have distinguished themselves for special scholarship and marked ability. 

For the year 1919-'20 these fellowships may be awarded to the best 
qualified candidates applying in one of the departments enumerated 
below. 

Applications for fellowships may Jbe filed, on blanks provided, with 
the Dean of the Graduate School on or before the first day of March 
of the collegiate year preceding that during which the fellowship is de- 
sired. Such applications may be accompanied by recommendations of 
instructors and by specimens of original work of the applicants, either 
published or in manuscript. 

The applications of the various candidates are referred to the ad- 
ministrative committee of the Graduate School, which acts as a fellowship 
committee in connection with the heads of the departments in which 
fellowships are granted. The committee, after consideration of the 
relative merits of all applicants, nominates the successful candidates and 
recommends them to the Board of Administration for election. Fellows 
are elected for a term of one year. However, in special cases they may 
be reelected for one additional year. 

Fellowships for Graduates of Kansas Colleges. 

In order to promote advanced study at the University of Kansas, and 
to encourage the graduates of Kansas colleges and universities to con- 
tinue their work, the University of Kansas offers one fellowship of $300 
to each of eleven Kansas colleges. The colleges to which fellowships were 
granted for 1918-'19 were: Baker University, Bethany College, Emporia 
College, Fairmont College, Friends University, Midland College, Mc- 
Fherson College, Ottawa University, Southwestern College, Washburn 
College, and Cooper College. This list is subject to change each year 
by the administrative committee of the Graduate School after consultation 
with the committee of visitation of colleges. 

Candidates for fellowships are to be nominated by the faculties of 



72 



The Graduate School. 



the respective colleges, from the classes graduating in June before the 
September when they are to enter upon their fellowships. However, in 
case there are no satisfactory candidates in the classes referred to, candi- 
dates may be nominated from other graduating classes. It is understood 
that the candidate shall be from among those attaining high scholarship 
in the respective classes. On or before the first day of March of the year 
in which the fellowship is awarded, the president of the college receiving 
the fellowship shall send the name of the candidate nominated by the 
college faculty or its committee, with a statement of his qualifications, 
to the Dean of the Graduate School of the University of Kansas. 

The candidate's application will be considered by the administrative 
committee of the Graduate School as in case of other fellowships, and if 
satisfactory he will be recommended to the Board of Administration for 
election. A fellow so elected may choose his work, in accordance with 
the rules of the Graduate School, in any of the departments offering work 
in the graduate School. 

Each fellow may be called upon for not more than four hours' educa- 
tional service per week in the department in which he chooses his major 
work. 



DEPARTMENTS AND EQUIPMENT. 

The following departments offer graduate work in the University. In 
the majority of them the facilities are adequate for thorough prepara- 
tion for the doctor's degree, and in all of them the facilities are excellent 
for work leading to the master's degree. All the courses named are well 
equipped for graduate instruction. Laboratories and libraries are ample 
for this purpose. Especial opportunity is given for research and original 
investigation.* 



Anatomy. 

Ancient Languages. 

Bacteriology. 

Bacteriology and Pathology. 

Botany. 

Chemistry. 

Economics and Commerce. 

Education. 

Engineering. 

Engineering Mechanics. 

Engineering, Civil. 

Engineering, Electrical. 

Engineering, Mechanical. 

Engineering, Mining. 

English Language and Literature. 

Entomology. 

Fine Arts. 

Geology and Mineralogy. 



Germanic Languages and 

Literatures. 
Hispanic Languages and Literature. 
History and Political Sciences. 
Home Economics. 
Journalism. 
Law. 

Mathematics. 
Pharmaceutical and Biological 

Chemistry. 
Philosophy and Psychology. 
Physics and Astronomy. 
Physiology. 
Romance Languages and 

Literatures. 
Sociology. 
Zoology. 



For description of equipment of the departments, see College Section. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



ANATOMY. 



Professors: Coc.hill, . 

Instructors : Smith, Spicek. 

Candidates for advanced degrees who major in anatomy are required 
to present for entrance into courses 100 to 105, inclusive, the equivalent in 
biological training of zoology 1 or 2 and 3, and anatomy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
8, and 9. A reading knowledge of French or German also is essential. 
Students who are majoring in other departments may enroll in courses 
150 to 158. 

100. — Comparative Neurology. Five hours credit. Both semesters, 
by appointment. Fee $3. The evolution of the structure and function of 
the vertebrate nervous systems. Coghill. 

101. — Research Work in Neurology. Five hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. Admission may be obtained to this course only after consulta- 
tion. A comprehensive knowledge of general anatomy, physiology, and 
neurology is essential. Coghill. 

102. — Anatomical Correlation. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 
Normal functions are studied from the point of view of the reflex mech- 
anism. Phylogenetic and ontogenetic considerations. Assignments of 
individual problems and written reports. Coghill. 

103.--Physiological Histology. Five hours credit. First semester. 
Fee, $3. Changes in the cell occasioned by various stimuli will be 

studied by means of microchemical staining. 

104. — Advanced Work in Anatomy. Five hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. This course is designated for students who wish particularly 
to develop anatomical technique, gross and microscopic, along some 

special line. 

105. — Research Work. Five hours credit. Both semesters. The in- 
vestigation of specific problems selected by the student with the approval 

of the professor in charge. Coghill, 

106. — Seminar. Three hours credit. Both semesters. In this course 
subjects of current interest are discussed as they appear in the various 

journals. Coghill, 

150-153. — Human Dissection. A complete dissection of all structures. 

Coghill, Smith, 

Course 150. — Dissection of arm and thoracic wall. Three hours 

credit. Fee, $5. 
Course 151. — Dissection of leg, perineum, and abdominal wall. 

Three hours credit. Fee, $5. 
Course 152. — Dissection of thoracic and abdominal viscera. Four 

hours credit. Fee, $5. 
Course 153. — Dissection of head and neck. Four hours credit. 
Fee, $5. 
154. — Human Osteology. One hour credit. No fee. A systematic 
study of the human skeleton. Supplemented by drawings, clay-modeling, 
etc. Smith. 

(73) 



74 The Graduate School. 

155. — Topographical Anatomy. Three hours credit. Fee, $3. A 
laboratory course in human anatomy,, including dissections, study of 
models, preparations, cross sections. Prerequisites, courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 
(At Rosedale.) 

156. — Histology and Splanchnology. Five hours credit. Fee, $5. 
A brief course in the structure of the cell, followed by a systematic study 

of the structure of organs. Coghill and assistants. 

157.— Embryology. Two hours credit. Fee, $3. The study of the 

embryology of the chick and pig, followed by a consideration of human 

embryology. Coghill and assistants. 

158. — Neurology. Three hours credit. Fee, $3. Gross and micro- 
scopic anatomy of the nervous system. Coghill and assistants. 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

Professors : Wilcox, Walker. 

Associate Professors: Sterling, Oliver, Brandt. 

LATIN. 

100. — The Topography of Rome. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 1:30. Lectures and reading. Illustration by the use of photographs 
and stereopticon. Each member of the class will present written reports 
on subjects investigated by himself. Oliver. 

101. — Investigation in Roman Political Institutions. Two to five 
hours credit. First or second semester, by appointment. Given only after 
or in connection with course 162. This course will be conducted by addi- 
tional lectures, and by additional investigations by members of the 
course. The master's thesis may be worked up in connection with this 
course. Brandt. 

102. — Latin Epigraphy. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
3:30. This course has as its object an acquaintance with the forms and 
subject matter of Latin inscriptions. Members will be assigned investi- 
gations of the contributions of epigraphy to political, constitutional, and 
economic history, and to other fields. Brandt. 

103. — Investigation in Latin Epigraphy. Two to five hours credit. 
By appointment. Given only in connection with course 102. Additional 
investigation of special topics will be expected of members of the course. 

Brandt. 

104. — Elementary Sanskrit. Three hours credit. This course is 
designed especially for classical students, but may be taken with profit 
by advanced students of any language. It includes the elements of the 
language and the reading of easy texts. Special emphasis is given to 
phonetic and syntactic phenomena, which throw light on the grammar of 
Latin and Greek. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

105. — Comparative Grammar. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 2:30. This course gives a description and history of the Latin sounds 
and inflections, supplemented by a comparison of Latin with the related 
languages, Greek, Sanskrit, and German, to illustrate linguistic prin- 
ciples existing in all Indo-European languages. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

106. — Seminar in Syntax. Three or five hours credit. First semes- 
ter, at 9:30. Walker. 

107. — Seminar (continued). Three or five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 9:30. A subject for the thesis required of all candidates for 
the degree of master of arts is expected to present itself in the course of 
the work, and in the second term a portion of the time may be devoted to 
the working up of that subject. Walker. 

150. — Advanced Latin Composition. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Walker- 



Ancient Languages. 75 

151. — Plautus. Two hours credit. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

152. — Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

153. — Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius. Two hours credit. (Not 
given in 1919-'20.) 

154. — Pliny's Letters. Two hours credit. First semester. Walker. 

155. — Horace (Satires and Epistles). Two hours credit. Second 
semester. Brandt. 

156. — Lucretius. Three hours credit. First semester. Oliver. 

157. — The Annals of Tacitus. Three hours credit. (Not given in 
1919-'20.) 

158. — Juvenal. Three hours credit. Second semester. Walker. 

159. — Literature of the Empire. Three hours credit. (Not given 
in 1919-'20.) 

160. — Caesar's Gallic Campaigns. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. Walker. 

161. — Vergil. Three hours credit. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

162. — Roman Political Institutions. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 8:30. 

163. — Latin Poetry in Translations. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. Brandt. 

187. — Teachers' Course in Latin. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. Walker. 

GREEK. 

Professor.: WlLCOX. 

Associate Professors : Sterling. Brandt. 

173. — Homer's Iliad. Three hours credit. First semester. Brandt. 

174. — Plato's Gorgias or Republic. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Sterling. 

175. — Lyric Poetry. Two hours credit. Second semester. Brandt. 

176. — Greek Comedy. Two hours credit. First semester. Sterling. 

177. — Homer's Odyssey. Three hours credit. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

178. — Alexandrian Literature. Three hours credit. (Not given in 
1919-'20.) 

179. — Thucydides. Two hours credit. First semester (Not given in 
1919-'20. 

180. — Aristotle. Two hours credit. Second semester. (Not given 
in 1919-'20.) 

COURSES WHICH REQUIRE NO KNOWLEDGE OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE. 

185. — Greek Poetry in Translations. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. Brandt. 

186. — The Greek Drama in Translations. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. Brandt. 

188. — Greek Prose Masterpieces in Translations. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Sterling. 

189. — Greek Architecture. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Brandt. 

190. — Greek Sculpture and Paintings. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. Brandt. 



76 The Graduate School. 

bacteriology. 

Professor: Sherwood. 

Instructors : Treece, Downs, Irwin. 

100. — Research in Bacteriology. Two or more hours credit. By ap- 
pointment. Graduates taking this course must satisfy the instructor that 
they are able to carry on original investigation in the special field selected. 
Fee, $1 for each hour of enrollment. 

Sherwood and the instructor directly concerned. 

150. — General Bacteriology. Five hours credit. Both semesters. 
Fee, $5. Sherwood, Treece and Downs. 

153. — Bacteriology of Foods. Five hours credit. Second semester. 
Fee, $5. Treece, Irwin. 

154. — Special Methods in Bacteriology. Five hours credit. First 
semester. Fee, $5. Downs, Irwin. 

155. — Bacteriology of Soils. Two hours credit. Second semester. 
Fee, $2. Offered 1919-'20. Treece. 

157. — Immunity. Five hours credit. Second semester. Fee, $5. 

Sherwood, Downs. 

158. — Pathogenesis. Five hours credit. First semester. Fee, $5. 
Offered 1919-'20. Sherwood. 

160. — Bacteriological Journals. One hour credit. First semester, 
by appointment. Sherwood. 

161. — Special Problems in Bacteriology. Two to ten hours credit. 
Either semester, by appointment. Fee, $1 for each hour. 

Sherwood and the instructor directly concerned. 

BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY (ROSED ALE). 

(MEDICAL.) 

Professor: Major.* 

Associate Professor: Trimble. 

101. — Advanced Bacteriology. By appointment. Includes the more 
difficult technical procedure and problems of immunity, serology, vaccines, 
etc. Major, Trimble. 

102. — Pathology. By appointment. Research work in the various 
branches of pathology and immunology. Major, Trimble. 

103. — Special Pathology. Three hours credit. First semester, Mon- 
day and Wednesday, 1 to 4. Recitations and laboratory. This course 
takes up the study of special pathology as illustrated by gross and micro- 
scopic specimens. Major. 

BOTANY. 

Professor : Stevens. 

Associate Professor: . 

Assistant Professor : Charles. 
Instructor : Mix. 

100. — Morphology and Physiology of the Plant Cell. Five or ten 
hours credit. First and second semester, or both semesters, by ap- 
pointment. Fee, $1. A study of cell characters, adaptation to specific 
functions, and behavior under varying environment; nuclear and cell 
division; reproduction. Stevens. 

101. — Plant Ecology. Three hours, five hours, or ten hours credit. 
Throughout the year, by appointment. The relation of plants to their 
environment. Field work and reading. Warming's, Schimper's, Clem- 
ents' and Cowles' texts, and current literature. Stevens. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 



Chemistry. 77 

102. — Research in Plant Anatomy. Both semesters, by appoint- 
ment. Fee, $1. Stevens. 

104. — Botanical Conference. One hour credit. By appointment. 
Review and discussion of current botanical work. Reports on assigned 
subjects. 

150. — Systematic Botany. Five hours credit. First semester. 
Fee, $1. Charles. 

155. — Morphology of Thallophytes. Three hours or five hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. Fee, $1. Charles. 

156. — Morphology of Fungi. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Fee, $2. Charles. 

157. — Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Three hours 
credit. First semester. Fee, $2. Charles. 

158. — Problems in the Morphology of Spermatophytes. Five hours 
credit. First or second semester, or both, by appointment. Fee, $1. 

Stevens. 

159. — Problems in the Morphology of Thallophytes and Arche- 
GONIATES. Five hours credit. First or second semester, by appointment. 
Fee, $1. Charles. 

160. — Agriculture. Three hours credit. First semester. Fee, $1. 



161. — Trees and Shrubs. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Stevens. 

162. — Plant Pathology. Five hours credit. First semester. Fee, $1. 

Mix. 

163. — Methods in Plant Pathology. Five hours credit. Second 
semester. Fee, $2. Mix. 

164. — Problems in Plant Pathology. Three to five hours credit. 
Both semesters. Fee, $1. Mix. 

Graduate credit in the Botany Department for course 160 will be 
allowed only on the satisfactory completion of original investigations on 
some agricultural topic chosen in consultation with the department and 
the presentation of a thesis embodying the results of the investigation. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professors : Bailey, Cady (Chairman of the Department), 

Dains, Whitaker. 
Associate Professors: Allen, Stratton, Faragher. 
Assistant Professors : Long, Bruckmiller, Estes, 

Brewster, Elsey. 

Prerequisites. Students who expect to take a graduate major in 
chemistry and others who wish to do advanced work for graduate credit 
must present not less than the substantial equivalent of undergraduate 
courses 1, 2, 3, 51 and 61 or 62 before beginning their graduate work. 

Fees. In laboratory courses a fee sufficient to cover expenses will be 
charged. 

100. — Advanced Qualitative and Spectral Analysis.* Three hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. This course covers the ordi- 
nary methods of qualitative analysis as applied to the rarer elements 
and compounds, as well as training in the use of the spectroscope and 
spectrograph in the qualitative and quantitative examination of sub- 
stances. Cady. 

101. — Micro-Chemical Analysis. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, by appointment. A laboratory course in qualitative analysis, 

* In the Chemistry department, starred courses above 140 as well as courses from 100 
to 149 are graduate only, 



78 The Graduate School. 

identifying the substances by means of the microscope. Prerequisite, 
course 51. Allen. 

102.— Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Two hours credit. 
First semester. Cady. 

103. — Inorganic Preparations. (Advanced). Two or three hours 
credit. Second semester. Elsey. 

104. — Inorganic Chemistry Research. Five hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. Faragher. 

105. — Radiochemistry and Radioactivity. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, alternate years, by appointment. Lectures, recita- 
tions and laboratory experiments dealing with the chemistry of the 
radio-elements, their relation to the periodic system, and the trans- 
formations. It is recommended that the course be preceded by course 
153 in the Department of Physics. Cady. 

110. — History of Chemistry. Two hours credit. Second semester. 
A course in the history of chemistry and the development of chemi- 
cal theories. Lectures, library work, and the presentation of reports. 
The complete course requires two years, the first bringing the subject 
down to 1820 and the second from that time to date. Dains. 

111. — Chemical Seminar. One hour credit. Each semester, by ap- 
pointment. A review of recent literature. Required of all graduate 
students majoring in chemistry. 

First semester: Inorganic and physical chemistry. Cady. 

Second semester: Organic chemistry and allied topics. Dains. 

152. — Quantitative Analysis, Two, three, or five hours credit. Either 
semester. Allen. 

152A. — Sanitary Water Analysis. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, 10 to 12. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

152B. — Boiler Water Analysis. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
10 to 12. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

152C. — Gas Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

152D. — Food Analysis. Three hours credit. Both semesters, by 
appointment. Prerequisite, courses 51 and 61 or 62. Long. 

152E. — Oil Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

152F. — Iron and Steel Analysis. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, by appointment. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

152G. — The Chemistry of Milling and Baking. Two hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. 

Long. 

152H. — Industrial Organic Analysis. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. 

Estes. 

1521. — Wet Assaying. Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

152J. — Electrolytic Estimation of Metals. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

153. — Assaying and Metallurgical Analysis. Three or five hours 
credit. Second semester, 1 to 5, and by appointment. Whitaker, Estes. 

155. — Analytical Chemistry Research.* Five hours credit. Both 
semesters. Bailey and Allen. 

157. — Physicochemical Methods of Analysis.* Two hours credit. 

* In the Chemistry department, starred courses above 149 as well as courses from 100 
to 149 are graduate only. 



Chemistry. 79 

First semester, by appointment. This course furnishes a training in the 
use of the methods of physical chemistry in analysis. The experiments 
will be carried out with the aid of the polariscope, refractometer, color- 
imeter, and nephelometer. Conductivity measurements and methods 
adapted from the phase law will also be used. Cady. 

163. — Advanced Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit. Second 
semester, M. W. F., at 9; laboratory by appointment. Dains. 

164. — Organic Preparations (advanced).* Five hours credit. Either 
semester, by appointment. Must be preceded by course 163 or its equiva- 
lent. A study of organic synthetical methods and ultimate organic 
analyses. Dains, Brewster. 

165. — Organic Chemistry.* Five hours credit. Either semester, 
by appointment. A research course. This course offers, to those who 
have proper preparation, a chance for extended study and original in- 
vestigation. Dains. 

166. — Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry.* Two hours credit. 
First semester. Subjects to be discussed are as follows: 1916-'17, dyes; 
1917-'18, nitrogen derivatives; 1918-'19, terpenes and sugars. Dains. 

170. — Physical Chemistry. Five hours credit. First semester, at 9. 

Cady. 

171. — Physical Chemistry II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9. Cady. 

172. — Electrochemistry * Five hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. A laboratory course on the reactions involving oxidation 
and reduction, electrosyntheses and decompositions, the preparation of 
chemicals, the reduction of metals from their ores, and the purification of 
metallurgical products. Prerequisite, course 170. Elsey. 

173. — Chemical Statics and Dynamics.* Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. A study of the manner in which chemi- 
cal reactions take place, and the equilibria which result, from the stand- 
point of reaction velocities. Prerequisites: General physics, calculus, 
physical chemistry 170 or 171, and organic chemistry. Cady. 

174. — The Phase Law.* Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. A study of chemical equilibria from the standpoint of the 
phase law of Gibbs. Prerequisite, course 171. Cady. 

175. — Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry.* Two hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Different topics will be taken up each 
year for a cycle of years. The topic for 1918-'19 will be "Colloid Chem- 
istry." Cady. 

176. — Physical Chemistry.* Five hours credit. Either semester, 
by appointment. A research course extending over two or more semes- 
ters. An opportunity is offered, to those who are sufficiently advanced, 
to carry on investigations in this branch of chemistry. Cady. 

180. — Inorganic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 11. Whitaker and Estes. 

181. — Organic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 9. Whitaker. 

182. — Industrial Chemistry Research.* Five hours credit. Both 
semesters. Whitaker. 

190. — Metallurgy I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11. 

Whitaker. 

191. — Metallurgy II. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 

Whitaker. 

192. — Metallurgical Laboratory. Two hours credit. First semes- 
ter, by appointment. Estes. 

* In the Chemistry department, starred courses above 149 as well as courses from 100 
to 149 are graduate only. 



80 The Graduate School. 

193. — General Metallurgy. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11. 

Whitaker. 

195. — Metallography.* Two hours credit. Second semester, by- 
appointment. Laboratory work and conferences. Whitaker. 

199. — Teachers' Course in Chemistry. Two hours credit. One 
hour each semester, by appointment. Stratton. 

The profession of chemistry and chemical engineering is affording 
an increasing number of openings for men with a longer and more 
thorough training than is given in the four-year college or chemical 
engineering course. For this reason the department would call at- 
tention to the opportunities for graduate work in this institution lead- 
ing to the degree of master of arts or master of science. 

Without designating arbitrarily such a course, the department would 
suggest the following outline for the thirty hours of graduate work: 

First: A minor, of not over ten hours, to be chosen from the fields 
of physics, geology, engineering mathematics, or natural science. 

Second: The major subject — chemistry, twenty hours. This require- 
ment is to be satisfied by the election of a number of carefully selected 
graduate courses, a considerable portion of which should be classroom 
rather than laboratory work, and the completion of a thesis, requir- 
ing not over one-third of the student's time, which will demand the 
solution of some research problem along the line of pure or applied 
chemistry. This latter is an essential requirement for the degree, since 
experience of this nature is of special value for one going into prac- 
tical scientific work. 

ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE. 

" Professor : Boynton. 
Associate Professor: Duffus. 
Assistant Professors-: Ise, Ferguson, 



Lecturer on Accounting : J. D. M. Crockett, C. P. A. 

100. — Seminar. Two to ten hours credit. Either semester, by ap- 
pointment. This is a research course for mature students. Applicants 
for admission to the seminar must satisfy the instructors of their prep- 
aration and ability to undertake original investigation. Each student 
must pursue a definite line of work under the personal direction of one 
of the instructors. 

150. — Mone\. Three hours credit. First semester, at 10. 

Boynton. 

151. — Banking. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 10. 

Boynton. 

152. — Banking Practice. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10. 

Boynton. 

153. — Investments. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10. 

Boynton. 

154. — Business Organization and Management. Three hours credit. 

155. — History and Organization of Transportation. Two hours 
credit. First semester, at 11. Boynton. 

156. — Railway Rates and Regulation. Two hours credit. Second 
semester at 11. Boynton. 

157. — Corporations and Trusts. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 9. Ferguson. 

159. — Public Utilities. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 

Duffus. 



* In the Chemistry department, starred courses above 149 as well as courses from 100 
to 149 are graduate only. 



Education. 81 

160. — Insurance. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 8. 

Duffus. 
161. — Public Finance I. Three hours credit. First semester at 8. 

Ferguson. 
162. — Public Finance II. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 8. 

Ferguson. 
164. — Accounting I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 2. 

Ferguson. 
165. — Accounting II. Three hours credit. Second semester at 2. 

Ferguson. 
166. — Cost Accounting. Two hours credit. First semester, at 2. 
167. — Advanced Accounting and Auditing. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 2. 

168. — Statistics. Three hours credit. Second semester at 9. 

Ferguson. 
169. — Business Law. Three hours credit. Second semester at 11. 

Ferguson. 
170. — Labor Problems. Two hours credit. First semester at 8. 

Duffus. 
171. — Labor Legislation. Two hours credit. Second semester at 8. 

Duffus. 
172. — Immigration Problems. Two hours credit. Second semester 
at 10. Duffus. 

173. — Modern Economic Reform. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter at 10. Boynton. 

180. — Economics of Agriculture. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter at 1. Ise. 

181. — Markets and Marketing. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11. Duffus. 

190. — Elements of Economics. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. (Not open to students who major in economics.) Ise. 

191. — History of Economic Thought. Two hours credit. First 
semester at 9. Ise. 

192. — The Distribution of Wealth. Three hours credit. Second 
semester at 9. Ise. 

EDUCATION. 

Professors: Kelly, Olin, Johnson, Schwegler, Kent. 

Associate Professors : Nutt, Carter. 

Assistant Professors: Eikenberry, Battey, Watson. 

100. — Seminar in Educational Psychology. Two hours credit. Both 
semesters, by appointment. Carter. 

101. — Seminar in Mental Defects. Two hours credit. Both semes- 
ters, by appointment. Schwegler. 

102. — Seminar in Educational Systems of Herbart and Froebel. 
Two hours credit. First semester, by appointment. Olin. 

103. — Seminar in Origin and Early Development of Universities. 
Two hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. Olin. 

104. — Seminar in Educational Administration. Two hours credit. 
Both semesters, by appointment. Kent, Johnson, and Kelly. 

150. — History of Ancient and Mediaeval Education. Three hours 
credit. First semester, 8:30 and 3:30. Olin. 

151. — History of Modern Education. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 2:30; second semester, at 8:30 and 3:30. Olin. 

6— K. U.— 5419. 



82 The Graduate School. 

152. — Educational Measurements. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 11:30. Kelly. 

153. — Social Education. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11:30. 

Carter. 

154. — Educational Clinic. Three hours credit. Second semester, by- 
appointment. Schwegler. 

155. — Mental Measurement of School Children. Three hours 
credit. First semester, at 9:30. Schwegler. 

156. — Vocational Education. Three hours credit. First semester, at 
10:30. Johnson. 

157. — School Hygiene. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 3:30. 

Nutt. 

159. — Educational Classics I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
10:30. Olin. 

160. — Educational Classics II. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10:30. Olin. 

161. — High-school Administration. Three hours credit. Both se- 
mesters, at 8:30. Johnson. 

163. — Education in America. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9:30. Olin. 

164. — Educational Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 1:30. Carter. 

165. — Genetic Psychology for Teachers. (Not given in 1918-'19.) 

166. — Educational Statistics. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11:30. Kelly. 

167. — Advanced Educational Psychology. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 9:30. Carter. 

168. — Principles of Education. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11:30. Schwegler. 

169. — Technique of Teaching. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 3:30. Nutt. 

170. — School Surveys. Three hours credit. First semester, at 8:30. 

Kent. 

171. — The Abnormal Child. Three hours credit. First semester, ax 
10:30. Schwegler. 

172. — Supervision of Instruction. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 9:30 (Saturday). Kent. 

173. — City School Administration. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 9:30 (Saturday). Kent. 

174. — Educational Organization and Administration. Three hours 
credit. First semester, at 8:30. Kent. 

175. — Psychology of High-school Subjects. Three hours credit. 
First semester, at 9:30; second semester, »t 1:30. Carter. 

177. — Practical Problems of Public School Education. Two to 
three hours credit. Both semesters, Saturday, at 9. 

178. — Adolescence. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 11:30. 

Schwegler. 

179. — Moral Education. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
11:30. Schwegler. 

Teachers' Courses. 

180. — Teachers' Course in Physical Sciences. Three hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. Watson. 

181. — Teachers' Course in Biological Sciences. Three hours credit. 
Both semesters, at 11:30. Eikenberry. 



Engineering. 83 

183. — Teachers' Course in Home Economics. Three hours credit. 
First semester, at 9:30. Sprague. 

184. — Teachers' Course in Normal Training. Three hours credit. 
First semester, at 3:30. Nutt. 

185. — Teachers' Course in German. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 9:30. Engel. 

186. — Teachers' Course in English. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 2:30. Battey. 

187. — Teachers' Course in Latin. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 2:30. Walker. 

188. — Teachers' Course in French. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Neuen Schwander. 

189. — Teachers' Course in Mathematics. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 11:30. Mitchell. 

190. — Teachers' Course in Spanish. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Gardner. 

191. — Teachers' Course in History. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 2:30. Melvin. 

199. — Teachers' Course in Chemistry. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Stratton. 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS. 

Professor: Rice (H. A.). . 
Assistant Prof essor : Jones (J. O.). 

154. — Engineering Materials. Five hours credit. First semester, 
by appointment. Rice. 

155. — Hydraulics. Three hours credit. Either semester. 

J. O. Jones. 

158. — Hydraulic Power. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. J. O. Jones. 

ENGINEERING— Civil. 

Professors: Rice (H. A.), WILLIAMS (C. C). 
Assistant Professor : Welker. 

100. — Structural Designing. Five hours credit. First or second 
semester, by appointment. An advanced course covering cantilever, 
swing and suspension bridges, skeleton frames for buildings, train-shed 
roofs, standpipes, and elevated tanks. This course is designed to follow 
course 162. Lectures, recitations, and detail designing in the drawing 
room. Rice. 

101. — Research Course. A course of investigation of some matter 
directly related to civil engineering. This course should run through the 
year, making ten hours' credit. Arrangements for the course should be 
made with Professor Rice. 

159. — Maintenance of Way. Three hours credit. Second semester, 

Williams. 

160. — Railway Terminal Structures. Five hours credit. Second 
semester. An extended study of the design of retaining walls, water 
tanks, coal bunkers and coaling stations, ore bins, grain bins and ele- 
vators, turntables, transfer tables, train sheds, ash pits, chimneys, and 
other accessory structures. Williams. 

162. — Bridge Designing. Four hours credit. Second semester. 

Rice. 

165. — Reinforced Concrete. Three hours or five hours credit. First 
or second semester. Rice. 



84 The Graduate School. 

168. — Pavements. Three hours credit. Second semester. Lectures 
and laboratory. A study of road-building rocks, bituminous materials, 
brick and brick clays, wood blocks, fillers, and the economical selection 
of type of pavement. Williams. 

169. — Foundations. Three hours credit. Second semester. A study 
in the design and construction of ordinary and subaqueous founda- 
tions. Williams. 

172. — Sanitary Engineering. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Public sanitation, particularly with reference to the 
water-borne infectious diseases. Influence of good sewerage, drainage 
and water supply upon the health of communities. Visits to sanitary 
engineering works. State control of public water supplies and population 
of streams. Prerequisites, courses in water supply and sewerage. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and reading. Welker. 

ENGINEERING— Mechanical. 

Professor : Sibley. 
Associate Professor : Sluss. 

100. — Advanced Engineering Laboratory. Five hours credit. Both 
semesters, by appointment. Research work in some line connected with 
power development, fuels, lubrication or refrigeration, as may be se- 
lected in consultation with the instructor. Sluss. 

101. — Advanced Designing. Five hours credit. Both semesters, 
by appointment. The course calls for a complete design in all details 
of some machine or of a plant for manufacturing or power develop- 
ment purposes. Steam and gas machinery and systems of power trans- 
mission are given particular attention. Sibley. 

102. — Research Course. Five hours credit. Each semester, by ap- 
pointment. A full presentation of some engineering subject to be se- 
lected in consultation with the instructor in charge. It may be a sub- 
ject which is being treated in course 100 or 101. Sibley, Sluss. 

103. — Advanced Thermodynamics. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. An advanced course based on the mathe- 
matical theory of heat interchanges. Open to those who have taken 
the undergraduate course in the School of Engineering, or its equiva- 
lent. Sibley. 

ENGINEERING. 

Professor: Shaad. 

Assistant Professor : Garver. 

151. — Manufacturing. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Garver. 

152. — Industrial Administration. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Shaad. 

ENGINEERING— Electrical. 

Professor : Shaad. 

Associate Professor: Johnson (F. E.). 

100. — Power Transmission and Electric Railways. Four hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. An advanced course in these 
subjects, consisting of lectures, assigned readings, and problems, special 
attention being paid to the engineering features of long-distance power 
transmission and the electrification of trunk-line railways. Shaad. 

157. — Electric Lighting. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Johnson. 

158. — Electric Power Transmission. Five hours credit. Second 
semester. Shaad. 



English Language and Literature. 85 

162. — Central Stations. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Shaad. 
163. — Advanced Electrical Laboratory. Five hours credit. Second 
semester. Johnson. 

ENGINEERING— Milling. 

Assistant Professor: GtBIDER. 

163. — Mine Plant and Mill Design. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. Grider. 

164. — Mining Engineering. Three hours credit. Either semester. 

Grider. 
166. — Advanced Ore Dressing. Four hours credit. Second semester. 

Grider. 
167. — Mineral Land Surveying. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. Grider. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Professors : Dunlap, Hopkins, O'Leary. 

Associate Professors : Whitcomb, Sisson, Johnson, Lynn. 

Assistant Professors : Gardner, Birnham. 

Requirements for Master's Degree. (1) A schedule for the entire 
course for the master's degree must be approved by the department 
before work begins. (2) Three hours credit in Old English is required. 
(3) Fifteen of the total of thirty hours credit must be in strictly grad- 
uate courses or investigation. (4) Six to ten hours credit will be allowed 
for work on the thesis. 

103. — Introduction to Comparative Literature. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. Lectures on the general materials, methods, and pur- 
poses of Comparative Literature. Individual work according to the 
preparation and needs of the student. Whitcomb. 

106. — English Prose of the Eighteenth Century. Three hours 
credit. First semester, at 9. The authors studied will be Swift, Addi- 
son, Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith, and Burke. Lectures, library work, and 
the preparation of a thesis. O'Leary. 

107. — History of English Criticism. Two hours credit. Second 
semester. This course will be devoted to the genera) development of 
English criticism, or to some specialized field, according to the prepara- 
tion and needs of the class. Whitcomb. 

108. — Later Nineteenth Century Verse. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, twice a week. Special study of the poetry of Arnold, 
Fitzgerald, Clough, Swinburne, the Rossettis, and William Morris. A 
brief survey of the minor poets of the period and of contemporary 
verse. Johnson. 

109. — History of the Literature and the Teaching of Rhetoric in 
English. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10. Lectures, library 
reading and the preparation of a thesis. O'Leary. 

110. — English Prosody. Two hours credit. Second semester. The 
history of English verse and verse forms. Whitcomb. 

111. — Epic Poetry. Three hours credit. First semester. Study of 
the form and subject matter of the epic, and of the general place of epic 
poetry in the history of English literature. Whitcomb. 

114. — History of the English Language. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. After a study of the general principles of linguistic change 
and some study of Old English as a Germanic dialect, the development of 
the sounds, inflections, and syntax of English will be traced from old to 
modern times. Elementary Old English and a reading knowledge of 
German are prerequisite. Burnham. 



86 The Graduate School. 

115.— The Development of English Prose. Two hours credit First 
semester Tuesday and Thursday, at 11. A study of the important prose 
between 1350 and 1660, with a survey of the development of prose style. 

Sisson. 
123 and 124.— Seminar. Both semesters, by appointment. Individual 
research by properly qualified students under the direction of the gradu- 
ate committee. Designed in part for students preparing theses for the 
master's degree. Available divisions are the following: 

(a) Literature: Historical or critical study. Three to five hours 
credlt - Whitcomb, Johnson. 

(6) Pedagogy: Problems of English teaching and supervision. Two 
to four hours credit. Hopkins. 

(c) Language: Problems in the morphology and syntax of the English 
language. Three to five hours credit. Burnham. 

150.— Narration and Description. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 8, 9, and 10. O'Leary, Lynn, Morgan. 

151. — Narration and Description. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 8, 9, and 10. O'Leary, Lynn. 
152. — Exposition. Two hours credit. First semester, at 9. 

Gardner. 
153.— Advanced Argument. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
a ^ 2. Hopkins. 

155. — Literary Criticism. Two hours credit. First semester, at 1. 

Hopkins. 
156. — Versification. One hour credit. First semester, Monday, at 3. 

Hopkins. 
157. — Essay Writing. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10. 

O'Leary. 
158. — Prose Invention. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 1. 

Hopkins. 
160. — Elementary Old English. (Anglo-Saxon.) Three hours 
credit. Both semesters, at 3. Burnham. 

161. — Beowulf. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 3. 

Burnham. 
162. — Middle English. Two hours credit, First semester, at 2. 

Burnham. 
163. — Middle English. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 1. 

Burnham. 
168. — Modern English Grammar. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. Burnham. 

171. — American Literature. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. Hopkins. 

172. — American Literature. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 1. Hopkins. 

173. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Two 
hours credit. First semester, at 9. O'Leary. 

174. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Three 
hours credit. Second semester, at 9. O'Leary. 

175. — Victorian Literature, exclusive of the novel and Tennyson and 
Browning. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10. Dunlap. 

176. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three 
hours credit. First semester, at 11. Dunlap. 

177. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three 
hours credit. Second semester, at 9. Dunlap. 



Entomology. 87 

178. — Shakespeare. Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 10. 

Dunlap. 

179. — Chaucer. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9. Dunlap. 

180. — Shelley and Keats. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 11. 

Dunlap. 

181. — Browning and Tennyson. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 8. Lynn. 

182. — Carlyle and Emerson. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9. Johnson. 

183. — Milton and His Contemporaries. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 9. Johnson. 

184. — The Modern English Lyric. Two hours credit. First semes- 
ter, at 3. Whitcomb. 

185. — Technic and Theory of the Drama. Two hours credit. First 
semester, at 2. Whitcomb. 

186. — History of the English Drama. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 8. Johnson. 

187. — History of the English Drama. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 2. Whitcomb. 

188. — The English Novel. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 11. Dunlap. 

189. — The English Essay. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 

O'Leary. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Professor: Hunter. 

Associate Professor: Hungerford. 

100. — Original Investigation. 'Five hours credit. Throughout the 
year, by appointment. Experimental work in parthenogenesis. Fee, $1. 

Hunter. 

101. — Field Entomology, Biological Survey. Five hours credit. 
Throughout the year, including the Summer Session. The department is 
engaged in a survey of insect life in the state. This work will be re- 
sumed at the opening of the Summer Session. The course consists of a 
taxonomic and biologic study of all existing forms, investigations in their 
life histories, and relations to environments. Appointments on this sur- 
vey are made through consultation with the department. Hunter. 

102. — Morphological Development. Five hours credit. Throughout 
the year. Problems assigned with reference to the attainments of in- 
dividual students. Fee, $1.50. Hunter. 

103. — Orchard Life and Forest Life. Five hours credit. Through- 
out the year. The State Entomological Commission is conducting a com- 
prehensive and detailed survey of the insect life as it pertains to the 
orchards and forestry of the state. In this work special attention is 
given to statistical methods and detailed illustrations of distribution by 
means of maps and charts. A limited number of well-prepared students 
may receive appointments for credit on this work. * Hunter. 

104. — Conference. One hour credit. Throughout the year, by ap- 
pointment. This course affords an opportunity for the presentation and 
discussion of current research in this branch of science. During the 
present year the subject for consideration is the influence of chemical 
and climatic stimuli upon developing forms. Hunter. 

105. — Advanced Taxonomy of Insects. Five hours credit. Through- 
out the year, by appointment. Fee, $1. Hunter. 

151. — Morphology of Insects. Three hours credit. First semester, 
10 to 12. Fee, $1.50. 



88 The Graduate School. 

152. — Systematic Entomology I. Two hours credit. First or second 
semester, 1 to 3. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

153. — Biology of the Arthropods. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 10 to 12; first semester, 3 to 5. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

154. — Advanced Morphology of Insects. Three hours credit. 
Throughout the year, by appointment. Fee, $1.50. Hunter. 

155. — Taxonomy of Insects. Three hours credit. First or second se- 
mester, by appointment. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

156. — Applied Entomology. Two hours credit. First semester, 11 to 
12. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

157. — Applied Entomology II. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
8 to 9. Hungerford. 

158. — Insects and Public Health. Two hours credit. First semes- 
ter, 10 to 11. Hunter. 

159. — Teachers' Course. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment, Hungerford. 

160. — Agriculture. Two hours credit. First semester, 8 to 9. 

Hungerford. 

161. — Field Entomology and Insectary Methods. Two hours credit, 
3 to 5. Hungerford. 

162. — Apiculture. A research course dealing with the comparative 
anatomical studies in the various strains of bees and individual colonies 
of each strain. During the period of the war, graduate students also will 
investigate the various processes dealing with honey production. For this 
purpose, there has been associated with the department a model apiary 
and laboratory in charge of a competent apiarist. Hunter. 

FINE ARTS. 

Professors ; Butler, Skilton, Preyer, Downing, 
Griffith, Hekking. 

Piano. Five hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. Etudes 
of Phillipp, Liszt, MacDowell and others; transcriptions of Bach's organ 
fugues by Liszt, Tausig, Busoni; modern concert pieces and concertos. 
Open only to graduates of the artists' course or of other schools requir- 
ing a corresponding amount of work. Applicants for admission must 
play before the Fine Arts Faculty not less than three concert numbers, 
including a movement of a sonata or concerto, and give a public recital 
on completion of the course. Preyer. 

Organ. Five hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. Greater 
preludes and fugues and chorale preludes of Bach, of modern German, 
French, English, and American masters. Oratorio accompaniment and 
playing with orchestra. This course is subject to the same conditions as 
Piano. Skilton. 

Opera and Oratorio. Five hours credit. By appointment. Practical 
and critical study of the development of opera and oratorio, the practical 
work consisting of one hour a week of vocal study of selected numbers; 
the theoretical work of two hours' critical examination of complete works. 
Open only to graduates of the voice department or of other schools re- 
quiring a corresponding amount of work. Applicants for admission must 
sing before the Music Faculty not less than three concert numbers, in- 
cluding an aria, and give a public recital on completion of the course. 

Butler, Downing, Skilton. 

Composition. Five hours credit. By appointment. Original composi- 
tion in large forms: suite, sonata, overture, cantata, concerto. Open to 
graduates of the music department or of other schools requiring a cor- 
responding amount of work. Applicants must present original com- 



Fine Arts. 89 

positions in the smaller forms which show evidence of talent and mas- 
tery of material. Preyer, Skilton. 

Design. Five hours credit. Each semester. Advanced designing, 
calling for the completion of an original painting containing not less than 
three figures. Shortest dimensions of the canvas to be not less than 
three feet. Open to graduates of the School of Fine Arts or of other 
schools of equal standing. Griffith, Hekking. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE MASTER OF MUSIC. 

Candidates for this degree must be graduates of the School of Fine 
Arts or of some other school requiring a like amount of work. After 
graduation, candidates must have spent at least two -years in pursuit of 
their profession as concert artist, composer or teacher, and must furnish 
detailed and satisfactory evidence as to the nature and extent of this 
work. 

The candidate must spend at least one year in graduate work at the 
University. Of the total of thirty credit hours, not less than ten hours 
shall be in his major subject, and not less than six hours in a minor 
music subject. Work on the thesis must credit not less than four hours. 

All theses for this degree must be delivered to the Dean of the School 
of Fine Arts on or before May 15. 

Professors : Butler, Skilton, Preyer, Downing, Kendrie. 

Piano. Seven hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. Etudes 
of Phillipp, Liszt, MacDowell and others; transcriptions of Bach's organ 
fugues by List, Tausig, Busoni; modern concert pieces and concertos. 
Open only to piano graduates of the School of Fine Arts, or of other 
schools requiring a corresponding amount of work. Applicants for ad- 
mission must play before the Fine Arts Faculty not less than three con- 
cert numbers, including a movement of a sonata or concerto, and give a 
public recital on completion of the course. Preyer. 

Organ. Seven hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. Greater 
preludes and fugues and chorale preludes of Bach, and the works of 
modern German, French, English and American masters. Oratorio 
accompaniment and playing with orchestra. This course is subject to the 
same conditions as the course in piano. Skilton. 

Voice. Five hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. Modern 
French, Russian, German, Italian, English, and American song literature; 
the more difficult operatic and oratorio airs; a singing knowledge of at 
least one complete opera role, and one standard oratorio role. Open only 
to vocal graduates of the School of Fine Arts, or of other schools requir- 
ing a corresponding amount of work. Applicants for admission must 
sing before the Fine Arts Faculty not less than three concert numbers, 
including an aria, and give a public recital on completion of the course. 

Butler, Downing, Farrell. 

Violin. Seven hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. Paga- 
nini caprices, sonatas by Bach, concertos by Beethoven, Saint-Saens, Lalo, 
Tschaikowsky and others. Open only to violin graduates of the 
School of Fine Arts or of other schools requiring a corresponding amount 
of work. Applicants for admission must play before the Fine Arts 
Faculty not less than three concert numbers, including a movement of a 
sonata or concerto, and give a public recital on completion of the course. 

Kendrie. 

Composition. Six hours credit. Each semester, by appointment. 
Original composition in large forms: suite, sonata, overture, cantata, 
concerto. Open to graduates of the School of Fine Arts, or of other schools 
requiring a corresponding amount of work. Applicants must present 
original compositions in the smaller forms, which show evidence of talent 
and mastery of material. Preyer, Skilton, Nevin. 



90 The Graduate School. 

History of Music. Three hours credit. Each semester, by appoint- 
ment. Seminar and research, along special lines of development of 
musical forms, to be embodied in a thesis. Skilton. 

Instrumentation. Three hours credit. Each semester, by appoint- 
ment. Candidates for the degree must score a complete program for a 
full orchestra. Open to music graduates of the School of Fine Arts, or 
of other schools requiring a like amount of work. Applicants must 
present scores in the smaller forms. Skilton, Nevin. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Professor : Ha WORTH. 

Associate Professor : Moore. 

Assistant Professors: Todd, Havnes, Ellisor. 

A graduate student who has completed a fairly good course in geology 
and mineralogy, and a term or two in surveying, metallurgy, and ore 
dressing, is well prepared to begin on the following graduate courses: 

100. — Geologic Methods, Sections, Plane-table Work, etc. Five 
hours credit. First semester, at 1. Early in his graduate course the 
student should become familiar with methods of investigation and re- 
porting followed by the leading geologists of the world, partly in order to 
prepare himself to conduct original investigations, and also to be able 
to understand and appreciate the voluminous reports of original investi- 
gations with which he will be brought in contact. Prerequisites, under- 
graduate geology 2 or 2a and 26, 50, 71, 72, 73, or their equivalents. 

Haworth, Haynes. 

101. — Geologic Methods, Sections, etc. Five hours credit. Second 
semester, at 1. A continuation of 100. Haworth, Haynes. 

102. — Geology of Non-metals, Principally Coals. Five hours 
credit. First semester, at 2. The object of this course is to study in 
detail the coal fields of the world, including their geology, geography 
and commerce, arfd approved methods of field investigation. Prerequi- 
sites, undergraduate geology 2 or 2a and 26, 50, 71, 72, 73, or their 
equivalents. Haworth, Haynes. 

103. — Geology of Non-metals, Principally Oil and Gas. Five 
hours credit. Second semester, at 1. The industrial world has so com- 
pletely adapted itself to the uses of oil and gas that it would be calam- 
itous for their production to fail. Consequently, it is important that the 
geologist be well informed on all phases of their geology, geography, com- 
merce, and technology. Prerequisites, undergraduate geology 2 or 2a and 
26, 50, 71, 72, 73, or their equivalents. Haworth, Haynes. 

104. — Geology of Metals, General Principles of Ore Formations, 
and the Noble Metals. Five hours credit. First semester, at 3:30. 
This course and course 105 are intended to constitute a year's study in the 
geology of metals. At the outset a thorough study of the origin of ore 
deposits will be made, in which the writings of the best authorities avail- 
able will be used. It is presumed that this general study may be com- 
pleted in time to make a somewhat detailed study of the noble metals by 
the end of the term. Prerequisites, undergraduate geology 2 or 2a and 
26, 50, 71, 72, 73. Haworth, Haynes. 

105. — Geology of Metals. Five hours credit. Second semester, at 3. 
A continuation of 104. Prerequisites as for 104. Haworth, Haynes. 

106. — History, Geology, and Commerce of Mining. Five hours credit. 
Second semester, at 2:00. It is considered well worth while to devote one 
semester to a study of general mining, in which will be traced the cen- 
turies of mining history, in order that the practical man may have the 
assistance of all past experience to aid him in his profession. Pre- 
requisites, a sufficiently extended study, to assure an appreciation of the 
subject. 



Germanic Languages and Literatures. 91 

107. — Expert Examination of Properties. Five hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. This course is given expressly to prepare the 
student for making expert examinations of properties covering all classes 
of mines, and producing a report on same prepared m the most approved 
manner. It will require much reading and consideration of various well- 
known mining properties, and a specific examination and report upon 
some particular property. Prerequisites, substantially all the preceding 
courses herein listed. 

108. — Dissertation. Eight hours credit. Either semester. These two 
courses Sire a culmination of an extended graduate course in geology, and 
lead to a degree of doctor of philosophy. By the close of the preceding 
year the subject should be chosen, and at least a part of the field work 
should be done during the summer vacation. A specific area will be 
chosen for this purpose, and the student will be expected to make a com- 
plete survey and prepare a correct and elaborate report. 

109. — Advanced Invertebrate Paleontology. Three or five hours 
credit. First semester. This course is an amplification of course 57 in 
the College. The entire collection of fossil invertebrates is placed in the 
student's hands for study. Emphasis is laid on the examination of 
original papers; and, as many of these are in German and French, the 
ability to read these languages is essential. Moore. 

110. — Advanced Stratigraphy. Three or five hours credit. Second 
semester. In this course a detailed study is made of the earth's stratig- 
raphy as revealed by paleontology. Original papers are studied and the 
formations and deposits of different regions are compared. Moore. 

111. — Summer Field Work. Opportunity is offered advanced students 
in geology, either graduate or undergraduate, to do field work-in geology 
in connection with the University Geological Survey of Kansas, under the 
guidance of the department of geology, for which credit will be given 
the same as for work done in the classroom and laboratory. By appoint- 
ment. Haworth, Todd, Moore, Haynes. 

150. — Physiography. 

162, 163. — Invertebrate Paleontology. 

171, 172. — Economic Geology. 

173. — Structural and Dynamic Geology. 

180. — Systematic Mineralogy. 

183. — Advanced and Original Work in Mineralogy. Three, five or 
ten hours credit. Both semesters, by appointment. This course may be 
chosen by graduate students who have completed courses 2 (or 2a) and 
26, 31, 50 in the College and who wish to specialize in the subject of 
mineralogy. Haynes. 

184. — Petrography. 

185. — Advanced and Original Work in Petrography. Three, five or 
ten hours credit. Both semesters, by appointment. This course may be 
chosen by graduate students who have completed courses 2 (or 2a) and 
26, 31, 50, 81, "82 in the College, and who wish to specialize in the subject 
of petrography. Haynes. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professors: Engel, Thvrnau. 
Associate Professors : CoRinx, Kruse. 
Assistant Professor : Sturtevant. 
Instructor : APPELBOOM.* 

100. — History of the German Language. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Introduction to philological study. Wright's 
History of the German Languages, vol. I, and supplementary reading. 
Lectures and library work. 

♦Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 



92 The Graduate School. 

101. — Gothic. Two hours credit, first semester, and two hours, sec- 
ond semester, at 9:30. Braune's Gothic Grammar; Heyne's Ulfilas. 
Phonetics, grammar, and translation. Sturtevant. 

102. — Old Norse. Two hours credit, first semester; and two hours, 
second semester, by apointment. Noreen's Altnordische Grammatik. 
Holthausen's Altislandisches Lesebuch; The Elder Edda. Sturtevant. 

103. — Germanic Mythology. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
9:30. Kruse. 

104. — Old High German. Two hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Braune's Althochdeutsche Grammatik und Lesebuch. 

Sturtevant. 
105. — Old Saxon. Two hours credit. Second semester. Sturtevant. 
106. — Middle High German. Two hours credit, first semester, and 
two hours, second semester, by appointment. Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche 
Grammatik; Hartmann, Der Arme Heinrich; Nibelungenlied. Selections 
from Walther von der Vogelweide. Engel. 

107. — Seminar in German Literature. Two hours credit, first se- 
mester, and two hours, second semester, by appointment. The subject for 
study in 1919-'20 will be Heine. Thurnau. 

108. — The Romantic School. Two hours credit, first semester, and 
two hours, second semester, by appointment. Early Romantic school, 
first semester, and later Romantic school, second semester. Lectures on 
the Romantic movement, library reading, and reports. Corbin. 

109. — Special Studies in Hebbel. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, by appointment. Kruse. 

152. — History of German Prose Fiction. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. Thurnau. 
153. — The Lyrics of Goethe. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Corbin. 
154. — The Realistic Drama. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Kruse. 
155. — The Naturalistic Drama. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. Kruse. 
156. — The Romantic Drama. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Kruse. 
157. — Storm and Stress. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Engel. 
MODERN SCANDINAVIAN. 

158. — Modern Swedish I. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Sturtevant. 

159. — Modern Swedish II. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Sturtevant. 

160. — Modern Norwegian I. Three hours credit. First semester, by 
appointment. Sturtevant. 

161. — Modern Norwegian II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Sturtevant. 

Swedish and Norwegian are given in alternate years, but either may 
be given in successive years, if occasion requires. 

MODERN DUTCH. 

162. — Modern Dutch I. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Appelboom. 

163. — Modern Dutch II. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Appelboom. 

164. — Teachers' Course. Three hours credit. First semester, at 



Hispanic Languages and Literatures. 93 

9:30. Review of special topics in grammar and syntax, with composition 
and practical illustrative exercises based on Thomas' German Grammar, 
some study and drill in elementary practical phonetics, and a comparison 
and discussion of different methods in teaching beginning German. In- 
tended especially for those who expect to teach German in high schools. 
Open only to the best students of the department. (See School of 
Education.) Engel. 

HISPANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professor : Owen. 

Assistant Professors : Gardner,* Molina. 

Instructors: Osma, Albaladejo. 

100. — Seminar. Five hours credit. First or second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Open to candidates for an advanced degree who satisfy the 
instructors of their preparation and ability to undertake problems of 
original research. Each student may pursue a chosen line of work with 
the approval of the department and under the direction of its instructors. 

Owen. 

101. — Historical Spanish Grammar. Three hours credit. First 
semester, by appointment. A study of Spanish phonology, morphology 
and syntax in connection with readings from the oldest literary monu- 
ments and exercises upon facsimile manuscripts. Owen. 

102. — History and Development of the Drama. Two hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. The drama before the Golden Age. 

Gardner. 

103. — History and Development of the Novel. Two hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. The novel before Cervantes. 

Albaladejo. 

104. — The Romantic School. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. The romantic movement in Spain, particularly in its 
relation to those in England and France and to the national romantic 
tradition. Owen. 

105. — Spanish-American Literature. Three hours credit. First 
semester, by appointment. A study of the most important poets and 
prose writers of Argentine, Chile, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Columbia and 
other Spanish-American countries, e. g., Rodo, Andrade, Montalvo, Dario, 
Arboleda, etc. Molina. 

106. — Spanish Realia. Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. In this course an attempt is made to present the cultural, 
industrial, social, and political development of Spain, particularly since 
1450. Albaladejo. 

107. — Regional Literature of Spain. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. A general historical survey of those litera- 
tures of the Spanish Peninsula not written in Castilian. Particlar em- 
phasis will be placed upon the Catalan and Galician literatures. 

Osma. 

108. — Old Catalan. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. A study of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Old Catalan. 
Reading of some of the early monuments: Balades d'els trovayers, Mosen 
Jordi del Rey, Raimon Llull, Lo Desconort y sa poesia mistica, Muntaner, 
Ausias March. Osma. 

109. — Old Portuguese. Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. A study of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Portu- 
guese. Reading of selections from the Concioneiros dos trovadores, Tradi- 
coes epicas, Poema da Batalha do Salado of Affonso de Giraldes, Gil 
Vicente and Camoes. Osma. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 



94 The Graduate School. 

153. — History of Modern Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. From 1790 to the end of the nineteenth 
century. The influence of French neoclassicism and of the English and 
French romanticists. The rise of realism. Owen. 

154. — The Classic Spanish Drama. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Moreto, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, Cal- 
deron and Ruiz de Alarcon. Careful study of selected plays from each 
dramatist; more rapid reading of others. Gardner, Osma. 

155. — Contemporary Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. A study of the literary renaissance in 
Spain since the Spanish-American war; the "Generation of 1898"; novel 
drama and criticism. Lectures, collateral reading, and reports. 

Owen. 

156. — The Spanish Novel of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Cen- 
turies. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. 

Albaladejo. 

157. — Don Quijote. Three hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. Owen, Molina. 

158. — History of Early Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Owen. 

190. — Teachers' Course. Three hours credit. First semester, by 
appointment. Gardner. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Professors : Hodder, Patterson, Dykstra.* 
Associate Professors : Crawford, Davis,* Moore.* 
Assistant Professors : Melvix, Derry,! Chubb. 

Equipment. The University library has a considerable number of the 
basic sets requisite for historical research, such as Migne's Patrologia, 
the Monumenta Germanise Historica, the Scriptores Rerum Italicarum, 
the Rolls Series, the Journals of the Lords and Commons, the Reports of 
the English Historical MSS. Commission, and several series of the Calen- 
dars of State Papers. The general sets are supplemented by special col- 
lections in English legal history, the period of the French revolution and 
several fields of American history. The recent provision of separate 
quarters in the library for research students in history has improved the 
facilities for graduate work. 

HISTORY. 

100 and 101. — Seminar in European History. Three or five hours 
credit. First and second semesters, hours by appointment. A study of 
the sources in some restricted field and the preparation of papers based 
upon them; Designed to give practical experience in historical investiga- 
tion. Melvin. 

102 and 103. — Seminar in American History. Three or five hours 
credit. First and second semesters, hours by appointment. Practice 
work with source material. The subjects for investigation will be taken 
from the history of the trans-Missouri West. Hodder. 

150. — Greek History. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Patterson. 

151. — Roman History. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Patterson. 
152. — Mediaeval Institutions. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Patterson. 

* Absent on leave. 
t Acting 1918-'19. 



History and Political Science. 95 

153. — Medieval Culture. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Patterson. 

154. — Italian Renaissance. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Patterson. 

155. — Protestant Revolt. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Patterson. 

156 and 157. — English Institutions. Two hours credit. First and 
second semesters. Crawford. 

158 and 159. — History of the Common Law. Two hours credit. 
First and second semesters. Crawford. 

160. — Foundations of Modern Europe. Three hours credit. First 
semester. Melvin. 

161. — History of Contemporary Europe. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. Melvin. 

162. — French Revolution. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Melvin. 

163. — Napoleon. Two hours credit. Second semester. Melvin. 

164. — Diplomacy of the War. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Davis. 

165 and 166. — Problems of Modern European History. Two hours 
credit. First and second semesters. Melvin. 

167. — American Colonial History. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. Hodder. 

168. — American Revolution and the Constitution. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Hodder. 

170 and 171. — Presidential Administrations. Five hours credit. 
First and second semesters. Hodder. 

172. — Latin America. Three hours credit. Second semester. Davis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

104 and 105. — Seminar. Three or five hours credit. First and second 

semesters, hours by appointment. Individual investigation under the 

direction of the instructor. The field for investigation will be determined 

after the organization of the seminar. Chubb. 

181. — Municipal Government. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Derry. 
182. — Municipal Administration. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. Dykstra. 

183. — American State Government. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Chubb. 
184. — European Government. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Chubb. 
185. — The Judiciary Two hours credit. Second semester. Moore. 
186. — Political Parties. Two hours credit. First semester. Chubb. 
187. International Law. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Chubb. 
188. — Elementary Law. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Moore. 
189. — Principles of Political Science. Three hours credit. First 
semester. Derry. 

• 190. — History of Political Theories. Two hours credit. Second 
semester. Dykstra. 



96 The Graduate School. 

home economics. 

Professor ; SPBAGUE. 
Instructor: Jones. 

100. — Research Course. Five or ten hours credit. Either semester, 
by apointment. This course should run through the year to gain ten 
hours credit. Original investigation of some unsolved problem relating 
to the home. Open to graduate students who have sufficient preparation. 
Fee, $1 per hour. Sprague. 

101. — Seminar. Three hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 
ment. Discussion of and reports on current literature relating to home 
economics. The full presentation of some subject will be required. 

Sprague. 

151. — Dietetics. Five hours credit. Second semester. Fee, $2.50. 

Jones. 

152. — Special Problems in Home Economics I. Three or five hours 
credit. First semester. Fee, $1 per hour. Sprague. 

153. — Special Problems in Home Economics II. Three or five hours 
credit. Second semester. Fee, $1 per hour. A continuation of course 
152. Sprague. 

165. — Public Aspects of the Household. Three hours credit. Both 
semesters. 

JOURNALISM. 

Professor : Flint. 
Instructor: Lewis. 

100. — Seminar. Three to five hours credit. Either semester, by ap- 
pointment. A research course for mature students having the necessary 
preparation and ability to undertake a definite line of original investiga- 
tion under the direction of instructors. Flint. 

151. — Magazine Writing. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Flint. 

152. — The Short Story. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lewis, 

153. — Interpretation of the News I. Two hours credit. First 
semester. Flint. 

154. — Interpretation of the News II. Two hours credit. Second 
semester. Flint. 

155. — Advertising I. Three hours credit. First semester. Flint. 

156. — Advertising II. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Flint. 

159. — Editorial Problems and Policies I. Three hours credit. First 
semester. Flint. 

160. — Editorial Problems and Policies II. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. Flint. 

LAW. 

Professors: Green, Burdick, Humble. 

100. — Constitutional Law. Five hours credit. Daily, second semes- 
ter, at 11:30. General principles governing constitutions; the United 
States and the states; establishment and amendment of constitutions; 
construction and interpretation; departmental powers; police power; 
eminent domain; taxation; civil rights; constitutional guaranties; laws 
impairing the obligation of contracts, retroactive laws. Green. 

101. — Common-law Pleading. Two and one-half hours credit. Daily, 
first half of first semester, at 8:30. An analytical and historical study 



Mathematics. 97 

of the law of remedies at common law, including ancient modes of trial; 
special topics assigned, such as assumpsit, trover, trespass, for historical 
investigation of the development of the law of contracts and of torts. 

102. — Jurisprudence. Two and one-half hours credit. Daily, first 
half of first semester, at 11:30. An analytical study of the elements of 
jurisprudence, viz.: the science of human relations regulated by positive 
law; the theories of the state, sovereignty and government; an historical 
examination of the systems of English and American common law and 
equity. Humble. 

103. — Roman Law. One hour a week for twenty-seven weeks, first 
semester and first half of second semester, at 9:30. Development and 
extension of Roman law; its revival and present influence; the corpus 
juris civilis; the law of persons, of the family, of property, of servitude, 
of obligations, of delicts, of inheritance, of procedure, of criminal law, 
etc. Burdick. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Professors: Van deb Vries,* Ashton. 
Associate Professors : Mitchell, Stouffer. 
Assistant Professor : Lefschetz. 

100. — Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. Three hours 
credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. An introduction to the 
general theory of functions of a complex variable. Ashton. 

101. — Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. Three hours 
credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. The theory of assem- 
blages, limits, continuity, convergence, derivatives, integrals, etc. 

Mitchell. 

102. — Theory of Elliptic Functions. Three hours credit, through- 
out the year. Ashton. 

107. — Higher Algebra. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Selected topics in Bocher's Introduction to Higher Alge- 
bra. Fundamental properties of polynomials ; properties of determinants ; 
theory of linear dependence; systems of linear equations; linear trans- 
formations; multiplication of matrices; bilinear forms; properties of 
polynomials in general. Mitchell. 

108. — Galois's Theory of Equations. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. The application of the method of groups to the 
study of algebraic equations. Ashton 

110. — Theory of Curves and Surfaces. Three hours credit. Through- 
out the year. Van der Vries. 

111. — Differential Geometry. Two hours credit. Throughout the 
year, by appointment. Applications of the calculus to the theory of 
curves and surfaces. Mitchell. 

113. — Projective Geometry. Three hours credit. Throughout the 
year, by appointment. The logical foundations of projective geometry; 
principle of duality; projective transformations in one-, two- and three- 
dimensional forms; conic sections; introduction of analytic methods on a 
synthetic basis. The general projective group and its important sub- 
groups. Mitchell. 

114. — Fourier's Series, and the Potential Function. Three hours 
credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. Development of functions 
in Fourier's series, with applications to the solution of problems in 
physics. Introduction to spherical harmonics. The potential function. 
Prerequisites, courses 50, 51, 55. Ashton and M. E. Rice. 

115. — Projective Differential Geometry. Three hours credit. 
Throughout the year, by appointment. Elements of Lie's Theory: inva- 

* Absent on leave. 1918-'19. 

7— K. U.— 5419. 



98 The Graduate School. 

riants and covariants of linear homogeneous differential equations; pro- 
jective differential geometry of plane and space curves, ruled surfaces, 
and curves on ruled surfaces. Stouffer. 

120. — Celestial Mechanics. Three hours credit. Throughout the 
year, by appointment. Rectilinear motion, central forces, attraction, 
and potential, the two-body problem, general integrals of the problem of 
n bodies, the three-body problem, perturbations. Moulton's Celestial 
Mechanics, and collateral reading. Stouffer. 

121. — Theory of Numbers. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Divisibility, congruences, primative roots, quadratic resi- 
dues, quadratic forms, laws of reciprocity of Legendre-Gauss. 

Lefschetz. 
150. — Analytical Mechanics. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Stouffer. 
151. — Differential Equations. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Lefschetz. 
152. — Advanced Calculus. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Ash ton. 
153. — Elliptic Integrals. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Ashton. 
154. — Elementary Number Theory. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Lefschetz. 
155. — Series. Two hours credit. First semester. Mitchell. 
157. — Complex Numbers. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Ashton. 

159. — Modern Geometry I. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Van der Vries. 

160. — Modern Geometry II. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Van der Vries. 

162. — History of Mathematics. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Mitchell. 

1S9. — Teachers' Course. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell. 

PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

Professors: Sayre, Havenhill, Nelson. 

100. — Phytochemistry (Plant Chemistry). Five hours credit. 
First and second semesters. Original investigation and research work on 
the chemical constituents of plants, dealing especially with such con- 
stituents as exert a marked physiological action when introduced into 
the animal economy. Sayre. • 

101. — Research in Biological Chemistry. Two or more hours credit. 
Throughout the year, by appointment. Sayre, Nelson. 

102. — Biochemical Seminar. (For graduates only.) Weekly meet- 
ings. Prerequisites, a reading knowledge of French and German. Dis- 
cussion and reports on current biochemical literature. Nelson. 

151. — Analysis of Drugs and Dietetics. Two, three, or five hours 
credit. Either semester. This is a companion course to food analysis 
(see pharmaceutical chemistry P151), and is arranged especially for stu- 
dents who desire to qualify as food and drug analysts. 

Sayre or Havenhill. 

104. — Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Two or more hours 
credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. Havenhill. 



Philosophy and Psychology. 99 

150. — Biological Chemistry. Four or six hours credit. Second se- 
mester. A survey of the field of biochemistry. Lectures, conferences, 
laboratory work. Nelson and assistants. 

153. — Colloid Chemistry. Two hours credit. First semester. A 
study of colloids and the colloidal state of matter. Special emphasis is 
laid on the application of colloid chemistry to problems in biochemistry. 
Open to Senior and graduate students. Nelson. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

Professors: Hollands, Templix, Hunter. 
Associate Professor: Dookerav. 
Assistant Professor: Bills. 
Instructor: Paterson, Swabey. 

100. — Philosophical Seminar. Five or ten hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Opportunity will be given graduate students 
to continue in a more exhaustive manner the study of any of the subjects 
offered in the College courses, and to engage in original investigation. 
The work will be arranged to suit the special needs of individual students 
and will be under the immediate supervision of some instructor in the 
department. 

101. — Philosophical Seminar. Five or ten hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. A continuation of the preceding course. 

102. — Psychological Seminar. Three, five, or ten hours credit. 
First semester. Opportunity is given graduate students for the advanced 
study of special topics in psychology. The organization of the seminar 
will take different forms to meet the needs of its members. Individual 
study of theoretical questions will be provided for by individual appoint- 
ment. Group study of theoretical questions will be conducted through 
weekly meetings. 

103. — Psychological Seminar. Three, five, or ten hours credit. 
Second semester. A continuation of course 102. 

The following courses are open to undergraduates also. (For descrip- 
tion, see The College.) 

150. — Attention, Learning and Thought. Three hours credit. First 
semester. Hunter. 

151. — Animal Behavior. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Hunter. 
152. — Abnormal Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Dockeray. 
153. — Child Psychology. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Dockeray. 
154. — Individual Psychology. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Paterson. 
155. — Social Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Hunter. 
156. — Instinct and Emotion. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
(Not given in 1919-'20.) Hunter. 

166. — Advanced Psychology of Learning. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. Hunter. 

167. — Principles of Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. Hunter. 

168. — Advanced Psychology I. Two to five hours credit. First 
semester. Hunter, Dockeray, Bills, Paterson. 

169. — Advanced Psychology II. Two to five hours credit. Second 
semester. Hunter, Dockeray, Bills, Paterson. 



100 The Graduate School. 

170.— History of Philosophy I. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Hollands. 
171.— History of Philosophy II. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Hollands. 
172.— Philosophical Classics I. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Swabey. 
173.— Philosophical Classics II. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. Swabey. 
174. — Theory of Knowledge. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Hollands. 
175. — Metaphysics. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Hollands. 
176. — Philosophy of Religion. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Hollands. 
177. — Advanced Logic. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Swabey. 
178. — Philosophy of the State. Social and Political Ethics. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. Holland. 

180.— Systematic Ethics. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Templin. 
181. — Practical Ethics. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Templin. 
182. — ^Esthetics. Two hours credit. Second semester. Templin. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

Professors : Hyde, Stoland. 
Assistant Professor: Welker. 
Instructor : Walling. 

100. — Research in Physiology. Five to ten hours credit. Either 
semester, by appointment. Open to students who have had proper prep- 
aration in physiology and allied sciences. Stoland. 

150. — Physiology of the Mechanisms of Nutrition. Five hours 
credit. First semester. Lectures and recitations, M. W. F., at 9:30; 
laboratory, four hours, by apointment. Stoland, . 

151. — Physiology of Movement and Sensation. Five hours credit. 
Second semester. Lectures and recitations, M. W. F., at 9:30; labora- 
tory, four hours, by appointment. Stoland, Walling. 

152. — Research and Seminar. Two to ten hours. Either semester. 
Research pertaining to the special senses, or nervous system, neuromus- 
cular or circulatory systems; heart or blood or respiration. By appoint- 
ment. Open to those prepared for it. Hyde. 

153. — Original Research in Experimental and Comparative Physi- 
ology. Two to ten hours. Either semester. By appointment. Investiga- 
tion in comparative physiological studies of the functions and activities 
of different forms of life. Open to those prepared for it. Hyde. 

161. — Experimental Physiology. Three to five hours credit. Both 
semesters. Stoland. 

162. — Physiology of the Organs of Internal Secretion. Three to 
five hours credit. Second semester. By appointment. Stoland. 

163. — Special Problems in Physiology. Two to seven hours credit. 
Both semesters. Stoland. 

170. — Medical Physiology. Five hours credit. Second semester. 
Lectures and recitations, M. W. F., at 8:30; laboratory, Tu. Th., 8:30 to 
11:30. The physiology of blood circulation, respiration, muscle, and 
nerve. Stoland, Welker. 



Physics and Astronomy. 101 

171. — Medical Physiology. Five hours credit. First semester. 
Lectures and recitations, M. W. F., at 8:30; laboratory Tu. Th., 8:30 to 
11:30. The physiology of the central nervous system, the senses, the 
digestive tract, secretion, metabolism, excretion, heat regulation, internal 
secretions. Stoland, Welker. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

Professor : Kester. 

Associate Professor: Rice (M. E.). 

Assistant Professors: Stimpson, Smith (T. T.), Alter. 

PHYSICS. 

100. — Graduate Laboratory. Two to five hours credit. Either se- 
mester, by appointment. Kester, Rice, Smith. 

101. — Theoretical Mechanics. Three hours credit. Through first 
and second semesters, by appointment. Lectures, with a problem hour 
each week. Prerequisites, course 50 or its equivalent, and another 
course of the same grade. Offered in alternate years. Kester. 

102. — Theory of Heat and Thermodynamics. Two hours credit. 
Through first and second semesters, by appointment. Lectures and prob- 
lems. A development of Gibbs's ideas of the thermodynamic potentials 
and of equilibrium in systems containing several components in various 
phases. Prerequisites, courses 50 and 51, or 52 and 53, or equivalents. 
Offered in alternate years. Kester. 

103. — Theory of Electricity. Three hours credit. Through first 
and second semesters, by appointment. Lectures and problems. Prerequi- 
sites, course 52 or its equivalent, and another course of the same grade. 
Offered in alternate years. (Not offered in 1919-'20.) Kester. 

104. — Advanced Optics. Two hours credit. Through first and second 
semesters, by appointment. Lectures and problems. A development of 
the electromagnetic theory of light, of the Abbe theory of optical instru- 
ments, etc. Prerequisites, course 51 or its equivalent, and another course 
of the same grade. Offered in alternate years. (Not offered in 1919-'20.) 

T. T. Smith. 

Courses 101, 102, 103, and 104 together form a two-year cycle, developing the funda- 
mental parts of physics in a rigorous and detailed manner. Other courses, covering more 
special (in some cases newer) topics, are listed below. 

105. — Electron Theory. Two hours credit. Throughout the year, by 
appointment. Theory of electromagnetic mass and of conduction of elec- 
tricity through metals. Prerequisites, physics 50 and 51, or 52 and 53, 
or equivalents. Offered in alternate years. Kester. 

106. — Oscillatory Electric Currents and Electromagnetic Waves. 
Three hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. Lectures and 
problems, giving the principles which underlie wireless telegraphy and 
telephony. Prerequisites, course 52 or its equivalent, another course of 
same grade, and some differential equations. Offered in alternate years. 
(Not offered in 1919-'20.) M. E. Rice. 

107. — Research and Thesis. Three to ten hours credit. Either se- 
mester. Students who are carrying on original investigations (either ex- 
perimental or theoretical) in physics will register in this course. 

Kester, M. E. Rice, T. T. Smith. 

114. — Fourier's Series and the Potential Function. Three hours 
credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. Development of functions 
in Fourier's series, with application to the solutions of problems in 
physics. Introduction to spherical harmonics. The potential function 
with applications to problems in electricity. Prerequisites, physics 50 or 
mathematics 50, mathematics 51 and 55, cr equivalent. Offered in al- 
ternate years. M. E. Rice, Ashton. 



102 The Graduate School. 

150. — Mechanics and Heat. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Kester. 

It is recommended that this course be followed by Mathematics 150, Analytic Me- 
chanics. Three hours. 

151. — Light and Radiant Energy. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Offered in alternate years. T. T. Smith. 

152. — Electricity. Three hours credit. First semester. 

M. E. Rice. 

153. — Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Offered in alternate years. (Not offered in 
1919-'20.) Kester. 

154. — Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy. Three hours credit. 
First semester. Rice. 

155. — Physics Laboratory. Light and radiant energy. Two to five 
hours credit. Second semester. By appointment. T. T. Smith. 

156. — Physics Laboratory. Electricity. Two to five hours credit. 
Either semester. By appointment. M. E. Rice. 

157. — Physics Laboratory. Gas conduction and radioactivity. Two 
to five hours credit. Second semester. By appointment. Offered in 
alternate years. Kester. 

158. — Temperature Control and Measurement. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. Offered in alternate years. Kester. 

159. — Electric Wave Telegraphy Laboratory. Two to four hours 
credit. First semester. Rice. 

160.» — Optical Instruments. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Offered in alternate years. (Not offered in 1919-'20.) T. T. Smith. 

161. — Alternating Currents. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Offered in alternate years. M. E. Rice. 

163. — Physics Colloquium. One hour credit. Either semester, by 
appointment. 

180. — Teachers' Course in Physics. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, by appointment. Stimpson. 

ASTRONOMY. 

120. — Advanced Astronomy. Any' one of the following: Orbit com- 
putation; celestial mechanics; special perturbations; general perturba- 
tions. These courses will involve a great deal of mathematical computa- 
tion. Hours and credit to be arranged. Alter. 

182. — Spherical and Practical Astronomy. Three hours credit; 
throughout the year, by appointment. Alter. 

183. — History of Astronomy. Three hours credit. First semester, 
by appointment. Alter. 

184. — Introduction to Astrophysics. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Alter. 

185. — Method of Least Squares. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Alter. 

186. — Theory and Practice of Interpolation. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Alter. 

187. — Theoretical Astronomy. Five hours credit. Throughout the 
year, by appointment. Alter. 

188. — Vector Analysis. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Alter. 

189. — Vectorial Mechanics. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Alter. 



The Graduate School. 103 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professor: Galloo. 

Associate Professor: NETJEN SCHWANDER. 

Assistant Professors: Stanton, Dkrry, Mahieu. 

Instructor: Cram. 

100 and 101. — Seminar. Five hours credit. Each semester, by ap- 
pointment. Research course for advanced students, who will be given an 
opportunity, under the immediate supervision of the department, to carry 
on investigation in the field of Romance linguistics or literature. 

Galloo, Neuen Schwander. 

102. — Colloquial and Medieval Latin I. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. The development of Latin as a spoken language 
from the sermo cotidianus of classical antiquity, through its popular and 
scholastic use in the early Middle Ages, to its final disintegration in 
vulgar speech, with constant reference to the phonology and the mor- 
phology of the Romance languages as exhibited in the earliest written 
forms. Derry. 

103. — Colloquial and Medieval Latin II. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. A continuation of course 102. Derry. 

104. — Old French. Three hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. Phonology and morphology of old French, with some discussion 
of syntax. Le Pelerinage de Charlemagne a Jerusalem, Aucassin et 
Nicolette. Must be preceded by courses 163 and 164 or their equivalents. 

Galloo. 

105. — History of the French Language. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Its rise from Low Latin ; the additions 
from other sources; its growth and modifications. Galloo. 

106.— Medieval French Literature. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. From the first literary monuments to the 
Renaissance. Mahieu. 

107. — French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. Two hours 
credit. First semester, by appointment. The Renaissance in French 
literature. The beginning of classicism. The Pleiade. Stanton. 

108. — Moliere. Three hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 
Study of Moliere; his life and surroundings, his plays — their sources 
and influence. One or more essays will be written, preferably in French. 

Galloo. 

150. — The French Element in English. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. Neuen Schwander. 

153. — History of Early French Literature. Three hours credit, 
first semester, by appointment. ' Galloo, Mahieu. 

154. — History of Modern French Literature. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Stanton. 

155. — French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Two hours 
credit. First semester, by appointment. Stanton. 

156. — French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Two hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. Neuen Schwander. 

157. — The Romantic School I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
by appointment. Galloo, Mahieu. 

158. — The Romantic School II. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Galloo, Mahieu. 

159. — The Literary Movement in the Second Half of the Nine- 
teenth Century I. Three hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 
The reaction against romanticism, the Parnassiens, realism and natural- 
ism. The reaction against the scientific spirit, idealism and symbolism. 
The rise and growth of the new literary criticism. Galloo. 



104 The Graduate School. 

160.— The Literary Movement in the Second Half of the Nine- 
teenth Century II. Three hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 

., -"- -r. Galloo. 

161.— Development of the French Novel I. Two hours credit 
First semester, by appointment. Galloo 

162— Development of the French Novel II. Three hours credit 
Second semester, by appointment. Galloo 

PPPo^ntaieSf FRENCH DRAMA Three hours credit - Seco *d semester, by 
' in a ^ Galloo. 

ment L ° FRENCH ' Two hours credit - First semester, by appoint- 

Galloo. 

165.— Old French. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 
ment - Galloo. 

188.— Teachers' Course in French. Three hours credit First 
semester, by appointment. Neuen Schwander. 

110— Provencal. Two hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 
Grandgents Provencal Phonology and Morphology, Appel's Provenza- 
lische Cnrestomathie and Schultz-Gora's Altprovenzalisches Elementar- 
buch - Neuen Schwander. 

111.— Provencal. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 
ment. A continuation of course 110. Neuen Schwander. 

120.— The Italian Theater in the Eighteenth Century. Two 
hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. Lectures and reports 
The Commedia dell' Arte. Reading of selected comedies of Goldoni and 
tragedies of Alfieri. Careful study of a few typical works. Prerequi- 
site, course 34, or its equivalent. . Cram. 

121. — Early Italian. Three hours credit. Second semester, -by ap- 
pointment. Monad's Crestomazia italiana; d'Ancona and Bacci's Ma- 
nuale della letteratura italiana, vol. I; Rossi's Storia della letteratura 
italiana, vol. I. Prerequisite, course 80, or its equivalent. Cram. 

The following course is open to undergraduates also (for description, 
see College section). 

180. — Dante, Three hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 

Cram. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

Professor : Blackmar. 

Associate. Professors .- Helleberg, Elmer. 

Instructor: Bodenhafer. 

Lecturer : Sippy. 

100. — Seminar of Sociology. Two to ten hours credit. Either se- 
mester, by appointment. This is a research course for advanced students. 
Applicants for admission to the seminar must satisfy the instructor of 
their preparation and ability to undertake original investigation. Each 
student may pursue a definite line of work under the direction of the 
instructors. Helleberg. 

101. — Seminar of Social Investigation. Two to six hours credit. By 
appointment. A research course for advanced students. Applicants for 
admission to the seminar must satisfy the instructor of their preparation 
and ability to undertake original investigation. Each student may pursue 
a special line of social investigation. Blackmar. 

102. — American and European Charities. Five hours credit. By ap- 
pointment. Research course. A study of charities administration in the 
United States and some of the principal cities of Europe. Personal in- 
vestigation of American charitable institutions, with special reference to 
methods of state control. Bodenhafer. 



Zoology. 105 

103. — Preparation for Institutional and Social Service. Five 
hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. A study of the adminis- 
tration of charitable, penal, and social institutions. A research course in 
the library is supplemented by investigation of institutions by visitation. 
Lectures by experienced officials. Preparation for special positions. 

Bodenhafer, Elmer. 

104. — Research Problems in Criminology. Five hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. The modern theories of criminality. 
Case-study of the life history of criminals. A critical analysis of methods 
of classification and reformation. Bodenhafer. 

150. — Elements of Sociology. Two hours credit. First and second 
semesters. Open to students who do not major in sociology. 

Blackmar. 

151. — Principles of Applied Sociology. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. Elmer. 

152. — Social Pathology. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Bodenhafer. 
153. — Remedial and Corrective Agencies. Two hours credit. Second 
semester. Bodenhafer. 

154. — Public Opinion. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Helleberg. 
155. — Psychological Sociology. Five hours credit. First semester. 

Helleberg. 
156. — The Family. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Helleberg. 
157. — Socialism. Two hours credit. First semester. Helleberg. 
158. — General Anthropology. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Blackmar. 
159. — Ethnology. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Blackmar. 

161. — Contemporary Society in the United States Three hours 
credit. First semester. Helleberg. 

162. — Development of Social Theory. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Helleberg. 

163. — Social Surveys Three hours credit. First semester. Elmer. 

164. — Municipal Sociology. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Elmer. 

165. — Immigration and Race Problems in the United States. Three 
hours credit. First semester. Blackmar. 

166. — Vital Statistics. One hour credit. Second semester. Sippy. 

167. — Eugenics. Three hours credit. Second semester. Blackmar. 

170. — Community Organization. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Elmer. 

ZOOLOGY. 

I' i a fessor : Allen. 

Associate Professor : Baumgartxer. 

Assistant Professors : Johnson, Robertson, Nowlin. 

100. — Seminar. Students working for a degree with the major in the 
department of zoology will register in this course for credit in work done 
in preparation for their theses. Credit will be given only upon a satis- 
factory presentation of the subject matter of the thesis before the depart- 
ment Faculty. 

101. — Problems in Morphological Zoology. Five or ten hours credit. 
Throughout the year. 



106 The Graduate School. 

102.— Problems in Systematic and Descriptive Zoology. Five or 
ten hours credit. Throughout the year. Johnson. 

103. — Problems in Histology and Cellular Biology. Five or ten 
hours credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. Baumgartner. 

104.— Problems in Vertebrate Paleontology. Five or ten hours 
credit. Throughout the year, by appointment. Allen. 

105.— Problems in Embryology. Five or ten hours credit. Through- 
out the year, by appointment. Allen. 

106. — Problems in Genetics. Five or ten hours credit. Through- 
out the year, by appointment. Robertson. 

107. — Problems in Protozoology. Five or ten hours credit. Through- 
out the year, by appointment. Nowlin. 

108. — Problems in Parasitology. Five or ten hours credit. 
Throughout the year, by appointment. Allen. 

109. — Problems in Cytology. Five or ten hours credit. Throughout 
the year, by appointment. Robertson. 

150. — Systematic Zoology. Five or ten hours credit. Throughout 
the year. Johnson. 

151. — Ornithology. Three hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Johnson. 

152. — Study of the Mammals. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Johnson. 

153. — Animal Histology, or Microscopic Anatomy. Five hours 
credit. First semester. Baumgartner. 

154. — The Cell. Five hours credit. First semester. Robertson. 

155. — Embryology. Five hours credit. Second semester. Allen. 

156. — Vertebrate Paleontology. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

157. — Parasitology. Three hours credit. First sesmeter. Allen. 

159. — Economic Ornithology and Mammalogy. Five hours credit. 
Throughout the year, by appointment. 

171. — Protozoology. Five hours credit. First semester. Nowlin. 

172a. — Genetics. Three hours credit. Second semester. Robertson. 

1726. — Animal Breeding. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Robertson. 

173.- — Zoological Conference. One hour credit. Both semesters, by 
appointment. Graduate and advanced undergraduate students meet with * 
the instructors for the discussion of current zoological problems. Re- 
ports on assigned subjects. 



SECTION III. 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

(107) 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

Olin Templin,$ A. M., Dean and Professor of Philosophy. 

David L. Patterson, B. S., Assistant Dean and Professor of European 
History. 

Ephraim Miller, Ph. D., Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and As- 
tronomy. 

Edgar H. S. Bailey, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

Alexander M. Wilcox, Ph. D., Professor of Greek. 

Lucius E. Sayre, Ph. M., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Frank W. Blackmar, Ph. D., Professor of Sociology. 

Charles G. Dunlap, Litt. D., Professor of English Literature. 

Edwin M. Hopkins, Ph. D., Professor of Rhetoric and English Language, 

Frank H. Hodder, Ph. M., Professor of American History and Political 
Science. 

Erasmus Haworth, Ph. D., Professor of Geology. 

Arthur T. Walker, Ph. D., Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

William C. Stevens, M. S., Professor of Botany. 

William A. Griffith,* Professor of Drawing. 

Eugenie Galloo, A. M., Professor of Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

Charles S. Skilton, A. B., Professor of Musical Theory. 

Ida H. Hyde, Ph. D., Professor of Physiology. 

James Naismith,! M-. D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Samuel J. Hunter, A. M., Professor of Entomology. 

Frederick E. Kester, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Hamilton P. Cady, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Bennet M. Allen, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

Edmund H. Hollands, Ph. D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Frank B. Dains, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Elmer F. Engel, A. M., Professor of German. 

John N. Van der Vries,! Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Arthur MacMurray, A. B., Professor of Public Speaking. 

Elizabeth C. Sprague, Professor of Home Economics. 

Raphael D. O'Leary, A. B., Professor of English. 

Arthur J. Boynton, A. M., Professor of Economics. 

Charles H. Ashton, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Henry C. Thurnau, Ph. D., Professor of German. 

Frederick R. Hamilton,* Ph. D., Director University Extension Division. 

William A. Whitaker,* A. M., Professor of Metallurgy. 

Leon N. Flint, A. B., Professor of Journalism. 

George E. Coghill, Ph. D., Professor of Anatomy. 

* Absent on leave. 

t Absent for war work. 

t Absent for war work, first quarter. 

(109) 



110 Faculty. 

Ole. O. Stoland, Ph. D., Professor of Physiology. 

Walter S. Hunter,§ Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

William M. Hekking, B. P., Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Carl F. Nelson, Ph. D., Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 

Clarence A. Dykstra,* A. B., Professor of Political Science. 

Noble P. Sherwood, A. M., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Arthur L. Owen, A. M., Professor of Hispanic Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

William V. Cahill, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Miles W. Sterling, A. M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Hannah Oliver, A. M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Selden L. Whitcomb, Litt. D., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Literature. 

Martin E. Rice, M. S., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Louis E. Sisson, A. M ., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

Alberta L. Corbin, Ph. D., Associate Professor of German. 

William J. Baumgartner, A. M., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Henry O. Kruse, A. M., Associate Professor of German. 

Clarence C. Crawford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of European History. 

Earl W. Murray,* A. B., Associate Professor of Latin. 

William S. Johnson, Ph. D., Associate Professor of English Language. 

Victor E. Helleberg, A. B., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Margaret Lynn, A. M., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Elise Neuen Schwander, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Herman C. Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

William W. Davis,! Ph. D., Associate Professor of American History 
and Political Science. 

Ulysses G. Mitchell, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Floyd C. Dockeray,! Ph. D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Joseph G. Brandt, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Greek and Acting 
Assistant Dean. 

Herbert B. Hungerford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ellis B. Stouffer, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Blaine F. MooRE,f Ph. D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

Florence Brown Sherbon, M. D., Associate Professor of Home Nursing. 

William M. Duffus, A. M., Associate Professor of Economics. 

George W. Stratton,$ Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Manuel C. Elmer, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Raymond C. Moore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology and Paleon- 
tology. 

Paul V. Faragher,* Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Alice L. Goetz, M. D., Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

Edwin F. Stimpson, B. S., Assistant Professor of Physics, 

James E. Todd, A. M., Assistant Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Albert M. Sturtevant, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Comparative Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

* Absent on leave. 

t Absent for war work. 

t Absent on military service. 

§ Absent on military service, first quarter. 



Faculty. Ill 

Lulu Gardner, A. £., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

Clifford C. Young,J A. B., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

William R. B. Robertson, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Theodore T. Smith, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Walter S. Long, A. M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Nadine Nowlin, A. M., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Joseph E. Welker,$ B. S., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Grace M. Charles, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Josephine M. Burnham, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Frank E. Melvin, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Modern European 
History. 

Frederick W. Bruckmiller,* A. M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Rose R. Morgan, A. M., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

Amida Stanton, A*. M., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Helen G. Jones,* A. M., Assistant Professor of German. 

Winthrop P. Haynes,J Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Geology and 
Mineralogy. 

John Ise, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Samuel O. Rice, Assistant Professor of Journalism. 

May Gardner,! A. B., Assistant Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

Dinsmore Alter,§ Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

John R. Frazier, Assistant Professor of Design. 

Clarence Estes, B. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

George H. Derry, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Maxwell Ferguson, LL. B., Assistant Professor of Economics and Com- 
merce. 

Grover C. Loud,$ A. B., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 

Felipe Molina, B. L., Assistant Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

Robert G. Mahieu, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Marion A. Bills, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Herman B. Chubb, A. M., Assistant Professor of Political' Science. 

Ray Q. Brewster,* A. M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Howard W. Elsey, A. B., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Edgar Wertheim, B. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles E. Johnson, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Elizabeth C. Meguiar, Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Lalia V. Walling, A. M., Instructor in Physiology. 

Esther Wilson, A. M., Instructor in English. 

Alice Winston, A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 

Maria L. Benson, Instructor in Design and Ceramics. 

Hearty E. Brown, A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Sara G. Laird, A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Helen R. Hoopes, A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Caroline B. Spangler, A. B., Instructor in German. 
Willard A. Wattles,:j: A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Esther L. Swenson,! A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 

* Absent on leave. 

t Absent for war work. 

t Absent on military service. 

§ Absent for military service, first quarter. 



112 Faculty. 

Hazel K. Allen, Ph. B., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Hazel H. Pratt, A. B., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Laurens E. Whittemore,! A. M., Instructor in Physics. 

Clifford W. Seibel,* B. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Walter B. Bodenhafer,* A. M., Instructor in Sociology. 

Peter A. F. Appelboom,! Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Donald G. Paterson,$ A. M., Instructor in Psychology. 

Arthur J. Mix,J Ph. D., Instructor in Plant Pathology. 

Emily V. Berger, A. B., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Sybil Woodruff,* A. B., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Gordon L. Cram, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Paul B. Lawson, M. S., Instructor in Entomology. 

Agnes A. Murray, A. M., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Elbert L. Treece, B. S., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Cornelia M. Downs, A. B., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

William A. Dill, A. B., Instructor in Journalism. 

Gertrude T. HAZEN,f A. M., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Jose M. Osma, Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

James E. Bond, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Ida Faragher, Instructor in Psychology. 

Amy V. Rader, A. B., Instructor in Chemistry. 

William B. Brown, Instructor in Journalism. 
Anna Marm, A. M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Florence Black, A. B., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Henry A. Shinn, A. B., Instructor in Public Speaking. 

Margaret Husson A. B., Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

W. Curtis Swabey, M. A., Instructor in Philosophy. 

Jose M. Albaladejo, Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

John A. Hess, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

W. F. Lange, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Nellie Barnes, A. B., Instructor in Rhetoric. 

Irene Scrutchfield, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Ruth Stevenson, A. B., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Alpha L. Owens, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Bertha M. Jones, A. M., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Vera W. O'Keefe, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Edward C. Perry, A. B., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Alice Lefschetz,** A. M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Edwin R. Peabody,** Instructor in Mathematics. 

Justice N. Carman, A. B., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Mary L. Johns, A. B., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Adelaide Steger,** A. B., Instructor in Physical Training. 

L. N. Morscher, A. B., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Marion Lewis, Instructor in Journalism. 

Myrtle E. Thurnau, A. B., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

* Absent on leave. 

t Absent for war work. 

t Absent on military service. 

** First quarter. 



Faculty. 113 

Alva C. Ellisor, A. B., Instructor in Geology. 

Larry M. Peace, A. M., Preparator and Demonstrator in the Botanical 
Laboratory. 

Bessie Douthitt, Assistant Instructor in Zoology. 
Mary E. Larsen, Assistant Instructor in Zoology. 
Ruth Endacott, A. B., Assistant Instructor in Physiology. 
J. D. M. Crockett, Lecturer on Accounting. 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

Olin Templin, Chairman. 

D. L. Patterson. L. N. Flint. 

F. B. Dains, W. S. Johnson, 

E. H. Galloo. W. C. Stevens. 
U. G. Mitchell. 



8_K. U.— 5419. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND 
SCIENCES. 



The College was the first school of the University to be organized. 
From its opening in 1866 it has offered to its students four years of liberal 
training, leaving in the main the development of the applied arts and 
sciences to the professional schools that have grown up around it. 

DEGREES. 

Graduates of the College who have completed the regular College 
course are admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, except that, upon 
request, any candidate who has met the requirements for that degree will 
be admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Science instead; provided, the 
larger part of his work has been elected in science departments; and 
provided further, his application has the sanction of the department in 
which his major work has been done. Those who have completed two 
years of College work and two years in the School of Medicine are ad- 
mitted to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 

ADMISSION. 

By act of the state legislature all graduates of accredited high schools 
in Kansas are admitted to the Freshman class without examination or 
condition. 

Candidates for admission who are not graduates of accredited Kansas 
high schools must offer, either on examination or satisfactory certificate, 
fifteen units from the following list: 

ENGLISH. — Rhetoric and English literature, 3 or 4 units. Three units required. 

MATHEMATICS. — Elementary algebra, IV2 units; plane geometry, 1 unit; solid 
geometry, % unit; plane trigonometry, V 2 unit; advanced algebra, V2 unit. Elementary 
algebra and plane geometry are required. 

FOREIGN' LANGUAGE. — Latin, 1, 2, 3 or 4 units; Greek, 1, 2, 3 or 4 units; Ger- 
man, 1, 2, 3 or 4 units; French, 1, 2, 3 or 4 units; Spanish, 1 or 2 units. Three units 
in one language, or two units in one language and one unit in another, are required. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES. — Physical geography, 1 or V 2 unit; physics, 1 unit; chem- 
istry, 1 unit. One unit required. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. — Botany, 1 unit; zoology, 1 unit; physiology, 1 or % 
unit; biological science, 1 unit. One unit required. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. — Greek and Roman history, 1 unit; medieval 
and modern history, 1 unit; English history, 1 unit; American history, 1 unit; economics, 
1 or V 2 unit ; civics, V2 unit. One unit required. 

MISCELLANEOUS. — Psychology, Vz unit; methods of teaching and school manage- 
ment, V 2 unit; commercial law, V2 unit; bookkeeping, % unit; drawing, 1 unit; wood- 
work, 1 unit; forging, 1 unit; domestic science, 1 unit; domestic art, 1 unit; agriculture, 
V2 or 1 unit ; music, 1 unit. Not more than three units are accepted. 

Any candidate from another state will be accepted on certificate, pro- 
vided he is eligible to admission to the state university in that state, and 
provided he has completed the subjects required for graduation from an 
accredited Kansas high school. 

Entrance Examinations. 

Candidates for admission who are not graduates of accredited Kansas 
high schools may offer themselves for examination in the entrance sub- 
jects above specified. A statement in regard to the time of these exami- 
nations will be found on page 52 of Section I, "General Information." 

(115) 



116 The College. 

Advanced Standing. 

Credit for work of collegiate or professional standing is granted only 
on recommendation of the Advanced Standing Committee. 

For regulations governing the granting of such credit, see Admission 
to Advanced Standing, Section I, page 52. 

Special Students. 

Persons of maturity and of serious purpose, who are not candidates 
for the College degree and who present satisfactory reasons for asking 
such exceptional consideration, may be admitted to the College as special 
students, subject to the provisions stated below: 

Any one regularly enrolled in another school of the University may be 
admitted as a special student to College classes, but all applications for 
such enrollment must be accompanied by the recommendation of the Dean 
of the school concerned. Such students are subject to the same regula- 
tions as other special students. 

Each candidate for admission as a special student must personally file 
with the Faculty Committee an application stating his reasons for his 
request, and must submit credentials from schools previously attended 
showing character and extent of preparation for the classes to which he 
desires admission. He must also submit to such examination as the com- 
mittee or the department concerned - may prescribe. This application 
must be renewed each semester. 

The Faculty Committee, subject to the approval of instructors or 
heads of departments concerned, will determine what courses the candi- 
date is prepared to pursue with profit, and will outline his program of 
studies for the semester. The Registrar will register a special student 
only upon the authorization of the Faculty Committee. 

Special students are subject to the general regulations regarding pre- 
requisites, number of hours, attendance, examinations, quality of work, 
etc. Failure in any course, or a low grade in previous work, may be con- 
sidered sufficient ground for refusal to allow subsequent enrollment as a 
special student. 

The Dean may withdraw the privileges of any special student who, in 
his judgment, is failing to comply with the spirit of the foregoing pro- 
visions. 

If a special student later becomes a candidate for a degree, the credits 
he has received while enrolled as a special student will not be allowed to 
count towards this degree, except by the approval of the Faculty. 

Extension Division^Credits. 

College students may offer towards the degree not to exceed sixty 
hours of credit received for work done in the Extension Division, but such 
credits will not be placed on their College record until thirty hours have 
been completed in residence. 

All regulations governing the election of courses and final residence 
must have been observed by the candidate for the degree. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission having certificates from schools accredited 
by the State Board of Education and all students of the University in- 
tending to pursue their studies during the ensuing year must present 
themselves for registration at the University on September 15, 16, 17. 
Registration at a later date will be permitted only on the payment of a 
fee of one dollar. 



The College. 117 

enrollment. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar, and fees 
have been paid, students should apply to the Dean for enrollment in their 
classes. Enrollment the first semester occurs September 16 and 17, and 
on the first day of the second semester. Enrollment at a later date will 
be permitted only on the payment of a fee of one dollar. 

Each student is assigned to a member of the Faculty as his personal 
adviser, who will assist him in the selection of courses, the arrangement 
of his schedule, and any other matters upon which he may need assistance 
or advice. The Faculty adviser is the assistant and representative of the 
Dean of the College, who is charged with the execution of all rules relat- 
ing to enrollment. 

Completion of Requirements. A student may not be enrolled in any 
subject in advance of any other which, for any reason, he has yet to take, 
and which is listed in the schedule. 

A student desiring enrollment in courses which presuppose certain 
subjects which he has not completed in the preparatory school must first 
make good such preliminary training within a high school or under a 
tutor authorized by the department concerned. 

Failures and Conditions. If the record of a student shows that he 
has failed in a course, or if he has received a condition which has not 
been removed during the previous semester, he must reenroll in the 
course, if it is listed in the schedule. 

THE CREDIT HOUR. 

For each credit hour of any course in the College the student is ex- 
pected to devote himself for three hours, either in the classroom, labora- 
tory, or outside preparation. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

For information in regard to scholarships and aid funds available for 
College students, reference is made to page 57 of Section I, "General 
Information." 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

For information in regard to fees and expenses reference is made to 
page 54, Section I, "General Information." All course fees must be paid 
before enrollment in classes will be permitted. 



118 



The College. 



Group. 

I. English. 



THE CURRICULUM. 

DEPARTMENTS OFFERING COURSES IN THE COLLEGE. 

Department. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 
V. 



VI. 



English Language and Literature. 

Journalism. 

Public Speaking. 

Ancient Ancient Languages and Literatures. 

Language. 

Modern Germanic Language and Literature. 

Language. Romance Languages and Literatures. 

Hispanic Languages and Literatures. 
Mathematics. Mathematics. 
Physical Chemistry. 

Science, Physics and Astronomy. 

Geology and Mineralogy. 
Biological Botany. 

Science. Zoology. 

Entomology. 
Physiology. 
Bacteriology. 
Anatomy. 
VII. History. History and Political Science. 

Economics and Commerce. 
Sociology. 
VIII. Philosophy. Philosophy and Psychology. 
IX. Miscellaneous. Home Economics. 

Physical Education. 
Design. 
Music. 
X. Professional. Law (fifteen hours, open to College Seniors) . 

Medicine. (See Medicine under "Description ot 

Courses.") 
Engineering (fifteen hours, open to College stu- 
dents) . 
Education (fifteen hours, open to College students). 
Fine Arts (fifteen hours, open to College Juniors 
and Seniors). 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ELECTION OF COURSES. 

In the choice of courses from these groups and departments the stu- 
dent must conform to the following regulations : 

Freshman-Sophomore Requirements. During the first semester 
every Freshman must attend a weekly lecture on hygiene, and spend 
three hours a week in the gymnasium. During the second semester he 
must spend three hours a week in the gymnasium. 

During the entire year every Sophomore must spend two hours a week 
in the gymnasium. 

Before the beginning of the Junior year the student must have com- 
pleted sixty hours, chosen from the list of courses open to Freshmen and 
Sophomores in accordance with the following requirements: 

a. At least five hours must be taken from each of six of the first eight 
groups. 



Election of Courses. 119 

b. Not more than twenty hours may be taken in one department. 

c. Rhetoric, five hours, must be taken by all Freshmen not offering it 
as a fourth year of entrance English. Credits for rhetoric are given pro- 
visionally. (See announcement of course.) 

d. Freshmen and Sophomores may not carry more than ten hours in 
one group at one time. 

Junior-Senior Requirments. The work of the Junior and Senior 
years must include a minimum of sixty hours, chosen from the courses 
offered by the various departments, but not more than twenty hours may 
be in courses open to either Freshmen or Sophomores. 

Juniors and Seniors may carry not more than twelve hours in one 
group at one time. 

The Last Thirty Hours Must be Done in Residence. 

Major Requirements. Before graduation the student must complete 
a major course of not less than twenty hours nor more than forty hours 
in one department, and not less than thirty hours nor more than sixty 
hours in the group including the major department. At least twelve 
hours of work in satisfaction of the department major requirements must 
be in courses not open to Freshmen or Sophomores. 

The courses constituting a departmental major must be chosen under 
the supervision of the faculty of the department concerned. 

In the selection of a major the School of Medicine is considered a de- 
partment. 

Free Electives. The work required for graduation not included in the 
major course is to be chosen subject to the restrictions that not more than 
twenty-five hours may be in any department, and not more than forty 
hours may be in any group other than the one in which the major course 
is elected. 

Rule for Students Having Advanced Credits. Students who have 
been granted advanced credits shall so select their studies that in the one 
hundred twenty hours offered for the degree the regulations governing 
the distribution of work shall be satisfied so far as possible; provided, 
that advanced credit in excess of the maximum prescribed for majors and 
minors may be granted the candidate at the time of his matriculation. 
Students admitted to Junior standing with a deficiency must meet the 
requirements respecting studies of the first two years only to the extent 
of their deficiency. 

Amount of Work to be Carried at One Time. Students of the Col- 
lege must be enrolled in not less than fourteen nor more than eighteen 
hours work, including- Hygiene and Gymnasium, but all applications 
for enrollment are subject to the approval of the Dean. When the past 
record or current work of a student indicates that he is unable to carry 
advantageously the amount of work permitted by the above regulation, 
he may be limited in his enrollment to such extent as may be considered 
advisable in his case. The Faculty urges students to confine themselves 
to the average number of fifteen hours of class work, and thus devote 
four full years to the completion of their undergraduate work. Experi- 
ence has shown that the crowding of the undergraduate courses results 
in serious loss in the quality of the work accomplished. 

Duplication of Courses. No course may be chosen which sub- 
stantially duplicates work for which credit has already been granted, 
either in the College or preparatory school. 

Amount of Work Required for Graduation. In order to be an ap- 
plicant for a degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences a 
student must complete 120 hours of class work, in addition to required 
hygiene in the Freshman year and required gymnasium work in the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. 



120 The College. 

Student's Responsibility. The individual student will be held re- 
sponsible for the election of his courses in conformity with the preceding 
regulations. 

Proportion of High Grades Required for Degree. In order to be ac- 
cepted as a candidate for the bachelor's degree, a student must have re- 
ceived a grade of A, B, C, I (one) or II in at least 90 of the 120 hours 
offered for the A. B. degree or of the number of hours required for the 
degree of A. B. or B. S. in medicine; provided that students graduated 
before September 1, 1918, shall be required to have a grade of A, B, C, 
I (one) or II in 80 hours, and students graduated after September 1, 
1918, and before September 1, 1919, shall be required to have a grade of 
A, B, C, I (one) or II in 85 hours. Any student admitted to advanced 
standing will be accepted as a candidate for a degree, provided his 
credits offered for graduation conform to the foregoing regulations and 
provided he receives A, B, C, I (one) or II on three-fourths of the work 
which he has done in residence at the University of Kansas. 

COLLEGE CREDIT FOR PROFESSIONAL COURSES. 

Juniors and Seniors in the College are permitted to enroll in certain 
courses offered in the professional schools and count the credit received 
for such work towards the bachelor of arts degree, but no student is per- 
mitted to offer credit from more than one professional school. The 
amount of credit that may be thus used is subject to the limitations indi- 
cated below. Students desiring to avail themselves of this opportunity 
must register in the professional school as well as in the College, but in 
enrollment the regulations of the College Faculty governing quantity and 
character of courses elected must be observed. 

School of Law. — Seniors in the College may offer fifteen hours from 
certain courses in the curriculum of the School of Law. See Section VI. 

School of Education. — Students in the College may elect not to ex- 
ceed fifteen hours from certain courses in the School of Education. See 
Section IX. 

School of Engineering. — A maximum of fifteen hours may be elected 
by the College student from certain courses offered in the School of En- 
gineering. See Section IV. 

School of Fine Arts. — Juniors and Seniors in the College may be en- 
rolled in not to exceed fifteen hours of certain courses in the School of 
Fine Arts. See Section V. 

School of Medicine. — For conditions of election of courses in the 
School of Medicine, see Section VIII. 

STATE TEACHERS' CERTIFICATE. 

Graduates of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will be recom- 
mended for the State Teachers' Certificate, provided they have credit in 
professional branches in Education to the amount of 18 semester hours, 
including not less than 3 semester hours each in General Psychology, 
Educational Psychology or Educational Theory, History of Education, 
and School Administration; and 6 semester hours additional in profes- 
sional branches allied to those herein mentioned; and provided the 
scholarship record shows at least as many hours rated A or B as it shows 
hours rated C or D. 



Ancient Languages. 121 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES.* 



ANATOMY. 

Professor: Coghill (Head of Department ) . 
Instructors : Smith, Spicer. . 

1. — Introductory Anatomy. Five hours credit. First semester, 8:30 
to 10:30. A course on the structure of the human body, especially for 
those students who are not preparing for medicine. Coghill. 

50. — Human Anatomy I. Five hours credit. First semester. This 
course is identical with that of the first semester of the medical curricu- 
lum, to which reference is made for complete description. Coghill. 

51. — Human Anatomy II. Five hours credit. Second semester. A 
continuation of course 1. Coghill. 

54. — Histology. Five hours credit. First semester. This course is 
identical with that of the first semester of the medical curriculum, to 
which reference is made for complete description. Coghill. 

55. — Neurology. Three hours credit. Second semester. This course 
is identical with that of the medical curriculum, to which reference is 
made for complete description. Coghill. 

ASTRONOMY. 

(See Physics and Astronomy.) 
ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

Professors : Wilcox, Walker (Head of Department). 
Associate Professors : Sterling, Oliver, Brandt. 

Equipment. The department is well supplied with wall maps, books, 
photographs, slides, and antiquities illustrating many phases of ancient 
life. Its library equipment of some 6,000 volumes includes complete sets 
of the more important classical journals. For- a somewhat detailed 
statement of the casts, plates, and photographs available for the work of 
the department, see the description of the Classical Museum, in Sec- 
tion XII. 

LATIN. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Those who intend to take only 
five hours of Latin to satisfy a group requirement must take course 1 if 
they have entered with no Latin, course 2 if with one unit, course 3 if 
with two units, course 4 if with three units. If they have entered with 
four units, they may select any five hours out of courses 5, 6, and 7. 

Except by special arrangement, those who intend to major in Latin 
must complete courses 5, 7, 9, and 12, before electing Junior and Senior 
courses. Course 10 is also required, and should be taken early. Course 
50 should be a part of the Junior work. 

* Numbers of Courses. Courses with numbers from 1 to 49 are open to Freshmen 
and Sophomores; courses marked with an asterisk (*) are reserved for Sophomores; 
courses marked with a double asterisk (**) are required of Freshmen. 

Courses with numbers from 50 to 99 are open to Juniors and Seniors on the condi- 
tions stated in each case. Many of these courses are also open to graduate students; these 
are listed under the Graduate School, with numbers increased by 100. 

* Days of Meeting. Courses giving five hours credit meet daily from Monday to Fri- 
day, inclusive. 

Courses giving three hours credit meet on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, unless 
otherwise specified. 

Courses giving two hours credit meet on Tuesday and Thursday, unless otherwise 
specified. 



122 The College. 

Those who expect recommendation as teachers of Latin without major- 
ing in the department must, in general, have taken at least twenty-five 
hours of Latin beyond course 4, including courses 5, 7, 9, 10, and 12. 
Education 87 and 87a may be included in this amount. The exact re- 
quirement depends somewhat on the character of the work. 

Those who wish to do the best work in Latin, especially those who 
look forward to graduate study in the subject, will need Greek and a 
reading knowledge of French and German. 

1. — Elementary Latin. Five hours credit. First semester, at 10:30. 
Though intended as a preparation for the further study of Latin, this 
course is planned largely for those whose chief interest is in English or 
the modern languages; general principles of language structure and 
development and the influence of Latin on English are emphasized as 
much as possible. Open to all who have had no Latin in the high school. 

Oliver. 

2. — Cesar (four books). Five hours credit. Second semester, at 10:30. 
Weekly exercises in Latin composition. Open to those who have had 
course 1 or its equivalent and have not read Cassar in the high school. 

Oliver. 

3. — Cicero (six orations). Five hours credit. Weekly exercises in 
Latin composition. Open to those who have had course 2 or its equiva- 
lent and have not read Cicero in the high school. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

4. — Vergil's ^Eneid (six books). Five hours credit. First semester, 
at 8:30. With the study of mythology and careful practice in metrical 
reading. The chief emphasis will be laid on the literary side of the work. 
Open only to those who have had three units of Latin, not including 
Vergil. Oliver. 

5. — Cicero (De Senectute). Three hours credit. Both semesters, 
at 9:30. With prose composition and a thorough review of the grammar. 
Open to those who have had four units of Latin, recommended to all 
who expect to take further courses in Latin, and required of all who ex- 
pect to prepare for teaching Latin. 

First semester, Brandt; second semester, Oliver. 

6. — Livy (one book). Two hours credit. Both semesters, at 9:30. 
This course is intended to accompany course 5, but may be omitted by 
well-prepared students. 

First semester, Oliver; second semester, Brandt. 

7. — Horace (Odes). Three hours credit. Second semester, at 10:30. 
With careful practice in metrical reading. The chief emphasis is laid on 
the literary side of the work. Must be preceded by course 4; should be 
preceded by either 5 or 6. Oliver. 

8. — Terence (two plays). Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
10:30. Must be preceded by course 5. Walker. 

9, — Cicero's Letters Three hours credit. First semester at 10:30. 
The chief emphasis is laid on the historical points involved, so that the 
student gets a good knowledge of the period in which Caesar and Cicero 
lived. Must be preceded by five hours beyond course 4. It is strongly 
recommended that course 12 be taken at the same time. Walker. 

11. — Roman Private Life. One hour credit. Second semester, Tues- 
day, at 8:30. Johnston's Private Life of the Romans, supplemented by 
occasional lectures and the use of illustrative material. Oliver. 

12. — Latin Composition. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10:30. 
Part I or Part II of Nutting's Advanced Latin Composition, or an 
equivalent. Intended to accompany course 9, but may be taken earlier 
by well-prepared students, the only necessary preparation being given in 
course 5. Required of all who wish a recommendation from the depart- 
ment as teachers of Latin. Walker. 



Ancient Languages. 123 

50. — Advanced Latin Composition. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 1:30. Prerequisite, course 12. Required as part of major. 

Walker. 

Each of the following reading courses, 51 to 59, inclusive, must be 
preceded by at least eleven hours from courses 5 to 12, inclusive. 

51. — Plautus. Two hours credit. 

52. — Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics. Two hours credit. (Not given 
in 1919-'20.) 

53. — Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius. Two hours credit. (Not 
given in 1919-'20.) 

54. — Pliny's Letters. Two hours credit. First semester, at 1:30. 
Walker. 

55. — Horace (Satires and Epistles). Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 8:30. Brandt. 

56. — Lucretius. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9:30. Oliver. 

57. — The Annals of Tacitus. Three hours credit. (Not given in 
1919-'20.) 

58. — Juvenal. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 2:30. 
Walker. 

59. — Literature of the Empire. Three hours credit. A study of the 
history of literature under the empire, supplemented by the reading of 
portions of the most important works. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

60. — Caesar's Gallic Campaigns. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 1:30. A critical study of the Gallic War, with especial refer- 
ence to military, historical, and geographical questions. The course is 
intended primarily as an introduction to the methods of the graduate 
seminar, and secondarily as a practical course for teachers. Open to 
Seniors. Walker. 

61. — Vergil. Three hours credit. A rapid survey of the contents of 
the ^Eneid, with a stucfy of the motives of the poem and Vergil's method 
of handling his material. A critical study of a few passages which 
involve difficulties of interpretation or of textual criticism. It is rec- 
ommended that this course be preceded or accompanied by course 52. 
Open to Seniors. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

COURSES WHICH REQUIRE NO KNOWLEDGE OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE. 

10. — History of Roman Literature.* Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 9:30. Mackail's Latin Literature, supplemented by lectures 
and assigned readings in English translations of the more important 
authors. Oliver. 

62. — Roman Political Institutions. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 8:30. A study of the development and form of the Roman 
governmental system through the republic and the early empire. The 
course will be conducted by lectures and assigned readings. Brandt. 

63. — Latin Poetry in Translations. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 8:30. Selections from the epic, lyric, dramatic, and pastoral 
fields will be studied, (a) in their relation to corresponding literary 
forms in Greece, (b) as national poetry, and (c) in their relation to sub- 
sequent development in these fields. Continues, but is not necessarily pre- 
ceded by, courses 85 and 86. Brandt. 

GREEK. 

21. — Elementary Greek. Five hours credit. First semester, at 9:30. 
Introductory course, covering the forms, syntax, and vocabulary neces- 
sary as a foundation for reading the literature. Sterling. 

22. — Xenophon's Anabasis. Five hours credit. Second semester, at 
9:30. Application of principles learned in the preceding course, with a 
study of Xenophon's life and works. Sterling. 



124 The College. 

23. Homer's Iliad. Three hours credit. First semester, at 10:30. 
Reading of as much as possible in the original, and the rest in transla- 
tion. Study of Homeric forms and versification. Sterling. 

24. — Plato's Apology, Crito, and selections from the Phaedo and 
Symposium. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 10:30. Study of 
the life and work of Socrates. Sterling. 

25. — Greek Tragedy. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11:30. 
The Antigone of Sophocles and Iphigenia in Tauris of Euripides. Study 
of the Greek theater and dramatic form. Sterling. 

71. — Elementary Greek. Five hours credit. First semester, at 1:30. 
The same as course 21, except that more work will be required. 

Sterling. 

72. — Xenophon's Anabasis. Five hours credit. Second semester, at 
1 :30. The same as course 22, except that more will be read. Sterling. 

73. — Homer's Iliad. Three hours credit. First semester, at 2:30, or 
by appointment. Reading of the whole book in the original, with critical 
study of select portions. Study of the Epic and Homeric life and times. 

Brandt. 

74. — Plato's Gorgias or Republic. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 3:30, or by appointment. Outside reading of other dialogs 
of Plato. Study of the life and thought of his time. Sterling. 

75. — Lyric Poetry. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 2:30, or 
by appointment. Selections from Elegiac, Iambic, and Melic poetry. 

Brandt. 

76. — Greek Comedy. Two hours credit. First semester, at 8:30, or 
by appointment. The Clouds and Frogs of Aristophanes. Study of the 
origin and development, form and content of Greek comedy. Sterling. 

77. — Homer's Odyssey. Three hours credit. Reading of the whole 
book in the original, with critical studies of select portions. (Not given 
in 1919-'20.) 

78. Alexandrian Literature. Three hours credit. Theocritus, Apol- 
lonius Rhodius, and the Anthology. Study of pastoral poetry and the 
late epic, and their influence on Latin and later poetry. (Not given in 
1919-'20. 

79. — Thucydides. Two hours credit. Reading of as much as pos- 
sible in the original, and the rest in translations. Studies in his style 
and historical method compared with Herodotus and later and modern 
historians. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

80. — Aristotle. Two hours credit. The Poetics, and selections from 
the Politics and Ethics. Study of Aristotle's place in the history of 
thought. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

for students of the new testament. 

31. — Elementary New Testament Greek. Five hours credit. Second 
semester, at 10:30. An introductory course for students who have no 
knowledge of Greek and wish to learn to read the New Testament in the 
original. Sterling. 

32. — New Testament I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11:30. 
Reading of as much of the New Testament in the original as possible. 
Prerequisite, course 31, or 21 and 22. Sterling. 

82. — New Testament II. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11:30. 
The same as course 32, except that more work will be required. 

Sterling. 



Bacteriology. 125 

FOR STUDENTS OF ENGLISH AND NATURAL SCIENCES. 

33. — The Greek in English. Three hours credit. First semester at 
8:30. A study of English etymology, with especial reference to Greek. 
Only so much Greek is studied as is necessary for the end in view. This 
course may not be used to satisfy a freshman-sophomore group require- 
ment. Sterling. 

COURSES WHICH REQUIRE NO KNOWLEDGE OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE. 

85. — Greek Poetry in Translations. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 11 :30. The epic and lyric poetry of the classic and Alexandrian 
ages. Study of form and content and influence on later poetry. 

Brandt. 

86. — The Greek Drama in Translations. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11:30. Ten to twelve dramas of iEschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripides, and Aristophanes are read and discussed from the points of 
view of form and content and influence on later and modern dramas. 

Brandt. 

87. — Greek Prose Masterpieces in Translations. Three hours 
credit. Second semester, at 2:30. Study of the form and content and in- 
fluence of the principal works of the historians, orators, and philosophers; 
especially Herodotus, Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Plato. Sterling. 

88. — Greek Architecture. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
11:30. This course includes the fundamental principles of all styles, with 
special reference to the survivals and revivals of Greek elements. The 
result ought to be a knowledge of all historic styles, and not simply the 
Greek. Brandt. 

89. — Greek Sculpture and Painting. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11:30. This course includes, for purposes of comparison and 
appreciation, a summary view of the sculpture and painting of later and 
modern times. Brandt. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

Professor: Sherwood (Chairman of Department). 
Instructors : Treece, Downs, Irwin. 

Equipment. The laboratories are provided with sterilizers, incuba- 
tors, refrigerators, centrifuges, glassware, etc. A compound microscope 
with high-power lens, a set of stains, and other equipment are allotted 
each student. The Water Survey laboratory is equipped for both bac- 
teriological and chemical investigation, and is available to a few well- 
prepared research students by special arrangement. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Course 1, course 50, or course 51 is 
a prerequisite for all subsequent courses in bacteriology. Each is di- 
rectly concerned with the application of bacteriology to human problems. 
Students who plan to study bacteriology with the expectation of teaching 
the subject, or of entering a public-health laboratory, should complete 
the following courses in other departments: Inorganic chemistry, quali- 
tative analysis, organic chemistry, chemical analysis of foods, chemical 
water analysis, quantitative analysis, physiological chemistry, general 
morphology of plants, plant physiology, elementary zoology, animal 
histology, parasitology, protozoology, German (15 hours), human anat- 
omy, medical physiology, and pathology. 

Students expecting to go into medicine should not fail to enter the 
section of general bacteriology that is prescribed for medical students. 
See the announcement of the department of bacteriology in the School of 
Medicine. 

50. — -General Bacteriology. Five hours credit. Both semesters; 
8 to 10; 10 to 12. Lectures and laboratory work. The lectures are 
largely illustrated and treat problems connected with general bac- 



126 The College. 

teriology and with the relation of bacteria to public health. Laboratory 
work deals with the preparation of media, cultural and staining methods, 
diagnostic tests, and the examination of bacteria that bear some relation 
to everyday life. Prerequisite, chemistry 1 or equivalent. Fee, $5. 

Sherwood, Treece, and Downs. 

53. — Bacteriology of Foods. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
1:30 to 3:30. Examination of milk, oysters, meats, etc., with supple- 
mentary lectures. Fee, $5. Treece, Irwin. 

54. — Special Methods in Bacteriology. Five hours credit. First 
semester, 10 to 12. The laboratory work embraces the use of spe- 
cial media, the preparation of vaccines, and diagnostic technic, such as 
that used in public health laboratories. Methods in sanitary examina- 
tion of water constitute part of the course. Fee, $5. Downs, Irwin. 

55. — Bacteriology of Soils. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
1:30 to 3:30. A laboratory study of the influence exerted by bacteria on 
the composition of soils. Fee, $2. Offered 1919-'20. Treece. 

57. — Immunology. Five hours credit. First semester, 10 to 12. 
Laboratory study of precipitins, agglutinins, bacteriolysins, and comple- 
ment fixation. Fee, $5. Sherwood, Downs. 

58. — Pathogenesis. Five hours credit. First semester, 8 to 10. 
A detailed study of lesions caused by bacteria. Prerequisites, course 50 
and animal histology. Offered in 1919-'20. Fee, $5. Sherwood. 

60. — Bacteriological Journals. One hour credit. Both semesters, by 
appointment. Reviews and discussions of current bacteriological litera- 
ture. Sherwood. 

61. — Special Problems in Bacteriology. Two to ten hours credit. 
Both semesters, by appoinment. Special work along some definite line 
with a view to obtaining familiarity with a particular kind of laboratory 
procedure. Fee, $1 for each hour of enrollment. 

Sherwood and the instructor concerned. 

BOTANY. 

Professor: Stevens (Chairman of Department). 
Assistant Professors : Charles, Sterling, Mix. 
Preparator and Demonstrator : Peace. 

Equipment. The equipment embraces microtomes, paraffin baths, etc., 
for histological work, simple and compound microscopes for each student, 
individual sets of apparatus for physiological experiments, and equip- 
ment for advanced work in plant physiology and pathology, a good her- 
barium for reference in taxonomy, sets of microscopic slides for each 
student, and abundant morphological material. There is a departmental 
library adjoining the laboratories. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Courses 1 and 2 are elementary in 
their respective fields and are without prerequisites. Not more than 
one of these elementary courses should be taken without consultation 
with the department. Students who are preparing to teach botany should 
take courses 1, 2 or 52, 3, 4, 50, 60, 61, 62, and bacteriology 50. 
Courses 1 or 51 and 55 in botany and 50 in bacteriology afford a good 
basis for sanitation. Courses 3, 60, and 62 are fundamental to scien- 
tific plant culture. Botany 1 or 2, 4, 5, and 61 and bacteriology 50 would 
be especially useful to students in home economics. Courses 3, 4, 50, 
61, and 62 are fundamental to arboriculture, city forestry, and the 
horticultural side of landscape and garden design. 

1 — The Living Plant. Five hours credit. Both semesters. Lectures 
and recitations. M. W. F. Laboratory, Tu. Th., 8:30 to 10:20. What 
plants reveal about the fundamental problems of life, and their relation 
to our welfare. Lectures, demonstrations, and recitations. Fee, $1. 

Stevens, Charles. 



Botany. 127 

2. — General Morphology of Plants. Five hours credit. First se- 
mester. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., at 10:30, Laboratory, M. W. F., 
10:30 to 12:20. A general survey of the great groups of plants to show 
the important steps in the evolution of the plant kingdom. Fee, $2. 

Charles. 
3. — Plant Physiology. Five hours credit. Second semester. Labora- 
tory, M. W. F., 10:30 to 12:20. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., 11:30 
to 12:20. The physiological activities of plants. Intake and outgo of 
material and energy, photosynthesis, digestion, translocation, storage, 
assimilation, respiration, excretion, irritability, and tropic responses, etc. 
Prerequisite, course 1 or its equivalent, or 2. Desirable antecedent, 
chemistry. Fee, $2. Mix. 

4. — Plant Anatomy. Five hours credit. First semester. Laboratory, 
M. W. F., 9:30 to 11:20. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., at 10:30. A 
study of plant tissues with special reference to their development and 
functions; plant products, their origin and physiological and biological 
significance; histological technique. Laboratory work, recitations and 
lectures. Prerequisite, course 1 or its equivalent, or 2. Fee, $2. 

Stevens. 
5. — Economic Plant Geography. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 9:30. The effect of climate and soil conditions of different regions 
of the earth on the natural plant life of these districts and their relation 
to the crop plants of economic value for timber or for the world's supply 
of food. Charles. 

50. — Systematic Botany. Five hours credit. First semester. Lec- 
tures and recitations, Tu. Th., at 9:30. Laboratory, M. W. F., 8:30 to 
10:20. Field trips Saturday mornings till November. Classification of 
flowering plants, with field study of local flora, and preparation of an 
herbarium. Prerequisite, course 1 or 2, or equivalent. Fee, $1. 

Charles. 
52. — General Morphology of Plants. Five hours credit. Second 
semester. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., 10:30. Laboratory, M. W. 
F., 10:30 to 12:20. A study of types of plants to show the development 
of the plant kingdom. Fee, $2. Charles. 

55. — Morphology of Alg^e. Three or five hours credit. Second sem- 
ester, by appointment. An advanced course in the algae with particular 
attention to life histories, local distribution, and relation to water sup- 
plies. Prerequisite, course 2 or equivalent. Fee, $2. Charles. 

56. — Morphology of Fungi. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work on the struc- 
ture and life histories of fungi. Prerequisite, course 1, or equivalent. 
Fee, $2. Charles. 

57. — Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Three or five 
hours credit. First semester, 1 : 30 to 3:30. An advanced course on the de- 
velopment and classification of liverworts and mosses. Lectures and labo- 
ratory work. Prerequisite, course 1 or equivalent. Fee, $2. Charles. 

58. — Problems in the Morphology of Spermatophytes. Five hours 
credit. Both semesters, by appointment. A study of the forms and struc- 
tures of plant members under different environments. Laboratory work, 
field work, and reading. Fee, $1. Stevens. 

59. — Problems in the Morphology of Thallophytes and Arche- 
GONIATES. Five hours credit. Both semesters, by appointment. A study 
of the structure, development, or distribution of plants of these groups. 
Laboratory, field work, and reading. Prerequisite, course 2 or equivalent, 
and advanced work in the group to be investigated. Charles. 

60. — Agriculture. Three hours credit. First semester, 8:30 to 10:20. 
A course dealing with the scientific principles underlying plant produc- 
tion and soil management. This course should be taken in conjunction 



128 The College. 

with entomology 60. Prerequisites, course 3 and entomology 1, or their 

equivalents. Fee, $2. 

61. — Trees and Shrubs. Three hours credit. Second semester, M. W. 
F., at 2:30. A, study of the nature, planting, and care of the trees and 
shrubs of special importance for home grounds, streets, and parks, and 
an introduction to landscape design. Lectures, reading, and field work. 

Stevens. 

62. — Plant Pathology. Five hours credit. First semester, 1:30 to 
3:20. Diseases of cultivated plants, their nature, cause and control. 
Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 1 or its 
equivalent, or 2. Desirable antecedent, course 3. Fee, $2. Mix. 

63. — Methods in Plant Pathology. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 1:30 to 3:20. A study of methods for the control of plant dis- 
eases; technique of isolation, culture, and inoculation of plant parasites. 
Lectures, recitations, laboratory and field work. Prerequisite, course 
62 or its equivalent. Fee, $2. Mix. 

64. — Problems in Plant Pathology. Three to five hours credit. 
Both semesters, by appointment. Original investigation of problems in 
plant pathology. Prerequisites, courses 3, 62 or its equivalent, and bac- 
teriology 50. Should be preceded or accompanied by course 63. Open 
only to Seniors and Graduates. Fee, $2. Mix. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professors : Bailey, Cady (Chairman of the Department), 

DAINS, WHITAKER.f 

Associate Professors : Allen, Stratton,* Faragher,** 
Assistant Professors: Long, Estes, Brewster, Elsev, 

Wertheim. 
Instructors: Berger, Murray, Rader, Lange. 

Equipment. The department is well supplied with the necessary and 
usual apparatus for lecture illustration and demonstration, for labora- 
tory work in the undergraduate courses, together with adequate equip- 
ment for effective research work in physical, organic, inorganic, an- 
alytical, industrial, and metallurgical chemistry. The liquid-air plant 
offers somewhat unusual opportunities for investigations at low tem- 
peratures. The department possesses a library of 3,000 volumes, con- 
sisting of the more important sets of periodicals and standard works of 
reference. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Students desiring to become pro- 
fessional chemists should select courses 2, 3, 51, 61 or 62, 71, and 90. 
The remainder of the possible forty hours in chemistry should be devoted 
to the subjects which will best fit each student for his chosen work. 

Those desiring to teach should select not less than twenty-five hours, 
which should include courses 2, 3, 51, 60, 61 or 62, and 80 or 81. 

For business or general culture, or as a foundation for work in 
botany, zoology, geology, mineralogy, or physics, at least 2 and 61 should 
be studied; for medicine, 2, 3, and 51. 

Students majoring in chemistry should have completed ten hours of 
physics, mathematics through calculus, and elementary courses in Ger- 
man, French, bacteriology, and geology. 

The department will gladly confer with students majoring in chem- 
istry and advise them as to choice of courses best adapted to individual 
needs. 

Fees will be charged in the various courses to cover cost of ma- 
terials, breakage, etc. 

1. Elementary Chemistry. Five hours credit. First semester, 

10:00 to 12:00 or 1:00 to 3:00. Second semester, 10:00 to 12:00. Recita- 

t Resigned. * Absent on leave, first quarter. ** Absen^on leave. 



Chemistry. 129 

tions, lectures and laboratory work. This course is designed for students 
who wish to get a general knowledge of the subject, but who do not wish 
to devote more than five hours to chemistry. It should not be taken by 
students who are proposing to go on with the subject. No one is admitted 
to the course who presents chemistry for entrance. 

Stratton and assistants. 

2. — Inorganic Chemistry. Five hours credit for students presenting 
high-school chemistry for entrance; six hours for students who have had 
no chemistry. Lectures and recitations. M. W. F., at 8 or 9. For the 
six-hour credit there will be an additional recitation at 3:00 Thursday, 
or 9:00 Saturday. Laboratory work, Tu. Th., 8:00 to 10:00 or 1:00 to 
3:30. . Cady, Elsey, and assistants. 

3. — Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Five hours 
credit. Second semester. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., 8 or 9. 
Laboratory, M. W. F., 8 to 10 or 1 to 3. Prerequisite, course 2. 

Cady and assistants. 

4. — Elementary Organic and Sanitary Chemistry. Five hours 
credit. First semester, 10 to 12. Designed for students preparing for 
home economics. Not a substitute for 61 or 62. Prerequisite, chem- 
istry 1. Bailey. 

49. — Quantitative Analysis. Two, three, or five hours credit. Both 
semesters. Prerequisites: courses 2 and 3. Allen and assistants. 

51. — Quantitative Analysis I. Two, three, or five hours credit. 
Both semesters, 10 to 12 or 1 to 3. A general course covering the funda- 
mental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analyses. Prerequisite, 
course 3. Allen and assistants. 

52. — Quantitative Analysis II. Two, three, or five hours credit. 
Both semesters, 1 to 3, or by appointment. In connection with this work 
some specialty, such as cement, glass, or packing-house industry, rock 
analysis, paint analysis, etc., may be pursued. Prerequisite, course 51. 

Allen and assistants. 

52A. — Sanitary Water Analysis. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 10 to 12. Laboratory work in the sanitary analysis of water and 
sewage. Lectures and assigned readings on the interpretation of results 
and upon the methods used. Especially designed to fit students for com- 
mercial positions in this line of work. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52C. — Gas Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. A laboratory course of general gasometric methods, analysis of 
flue gases, artificial, and natural gases. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52D. — Food Analysis. Three hours credit. Both semesters, by ap- 
pointment. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 
or 62. Long. 

52E. — Oil Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. The examination of petroleums and their products, lubricating oils, 
asphalts, and road materials. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52 F. — Iron and Steel Analysis. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Analysis of special steels and alloys. Prerequisite, 
course 51. Allen. 

52G. — The Chemistry of Milling and Baking. Two hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Designed to meet the requirements of 
chemists desiring to carry on control work in the milling industry. Pre- 
requisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. Long. 

52H. — Industrial Organic Analysis. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Including analyses of soap, paper, leather, 
starches, etc. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. Estes. 

9— K. U.— 5419. 



130 The College. 

521. — Wet Assaying. Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Volumetric methods for the estimation of copper, lead, zinc, 
manganese, iron, silver, gold, etc. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

53. — Assaying and Metallurgical Analysis. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, 3 to 5. The course will cover the fire assay of gold, 
silver, copper, and other metals. If a student has not taken course 52 
he may profitably supplement the fire assaying with two hours' work on 
the volumetric assay of ore and furnace products. Estes. 

60. — Chemistry of Food Products. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 3 to 5. This is intended as a general course for students who 
are interested in food supply, and includes a study of the source, com- 
position, and use of foods. Attention is also given to the world's supply 
of foods and its manufacture and preparation for the market. Pre- 
requisite, course 1. Bailey. 

61. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit. Both se- 
mesters, 1 to 3. Designed to cover briefly the aliphatic and aromatic 
series, to discuss the more important derivatives, and to show their re- 
lationships and applications. Prerequisite, ten hours chemistry. 

Dains, Brewster. 

62. — Organic Chemistry I. Five hours credit. First semester, recita- 
tions, M. W. F., at 9. Laboratory, Tu. and Th. mornings or afternoons. 
For students who wish a more detailed knowledge of organic chemistry. 
In this course the aliphatic series only is discussed, the aromatic series 
being reserved for organic chemistry 63. Prerequisite, ten hours chem- 
istry. Dains, Brewster. 

63. — Organic Chemistry II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
recitations, M. W. P., at 9. Laboratory, Tu. and Th. mornings or after- 
noons. Aromatic series. Prerequisite, course 62. Dains, Brewster. 

70. — Physical Chemistry I. Five hours credit. First semester, 
at 10. A course paying special attention to electrochemistry. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 3 and 
satisfactory preparation in general physics and calculus. Cady. 

71. — Physical Chemistry II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10. A general course in theoretical and physical chemistry. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisites, courses 2, 3, 
51, 61 or 62, and satisfactory preparation in general physics and cal- 
culus. Cady. 

80. — Inorganic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11. A study of the inorganic, industries, including such 
topics as the manufacture of acids, alkalies and other chemicals, fertil- 
izers, paint and pigments, glass, and cement, and the purification of 
water. Prerequisites, courses 2 and 3. Estes. 

81. — Organic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 9. A study of the inorganic industries, including such 
topics as the refining of petroleum, the distillation of wood and coal, 
packing houses, fermentation, soaps, leather, paper, starches, sugars, 
dyestuffs, etc. Prerequisites, courses 2, 3 and 61 or 62. Estes. 

90. — Metallurgy I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11. 
General metallurgy, the metallurgy of iron and steel. Prerequisite, 
course 3. Estes. 

91. — Metallurgy II. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 
The metallurgy of lead, zinc, and copper, followed by that of silver, gold, 
mercury, and tin. Prerequisite, course 3. Whitaker, Estes. 

92. — Metallurgical Laboratory. Two hours credit. First semester 
by appointment. This course includes high-temperatures measurements, 

Note. — Not more than ten hours from courses 49, 51, 52 and its options, and 53 may 
he taken. 



Design. 131 

calorimetry, preparation of silicate and alloys, study of roasting, reduc- 
tion, oxidation, amalgamation, chlorination, cyaniding, and leaching. 
Prerequisite, course 90 or 91. Estes. 

93. — General Metallurgy. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
11. Physical properties of metals and alloys, thermal analysis, pyrom- 
etry, refractories, slags, matte, bullion, typical metallurgical processes. 

Estes. 
DESIGN. 

Professors: Griffith,* Hekking, Cahill. 
Assistant Professor: Frazier. 
Instructor : BENSOX. 

Equipment. The department of design occupies six top-lighted stu- 
dios on the third floor of the new Administration Building. They are 
well equipped with casts from the antique, books and plates upon the 
theory and history of ornamental design, printing presses, a potter's 
wheel, and easels. The classical museum and the museum of natural 
history offer an abundance of material for the use of students in design. 
A model poses for the life classes and the University campus offiers an 
ideal sketching ground for the landscape painting classes. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Technical students to whom some 
drawing is essential are advised to take course 1. Students wishing 
training in artistic perception and graphic expression for its general 
culture value should take course 1, followed by 2, or course 52. 

1. — Free-hand Drawing. Three hours credit. Both semesters, 10:30 
to 12:30 or 1:30 to 3:30. Drawing with pencil and charcoal from the cast 
and objects of still life, including the principles of perspective and 
geometrical problems of mechanical drawing, which aims to teach the 
student to construct form in a simple and correct manner. 

Griffith,. Cahill, Frazier. 

2.— Design I. Three hours credit. Both semesters, 8:30 to 10:30. The 
anatomy of pattern and the planning of ornament. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Benson. 

51. — Free-hand Drawing. Three hours credit. A continuation of 
course 1, for students doing more advanced work. Prerequisite, course 1. 
Both semesters, 2 to 4. Griffith, Frazier. 

52. — History of Painting. Two hours credit. First semester, at 9:30. 
A lecture course presenting a survey of the whole field of painting, with 
the object of attaining the critical knowledge necessary to understand and 
enjoy a work of art. Griffith, Hekking. 

53. — History of American Painting. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 9:30. . Griffith. 

55. — Design II. Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 10:30. The 
application of design. Prerequis'ite, course 2. Benson. 

56. — Applied Design I. One hour credit. One semester, five hours 
per week, by appointment. Must be preceded by courses 1 and 55. 

Benson. 

57. — Applied Design II. One hour credit. One semester, five hours 
per week, by appointment. A continuation of course 56. Benson. 

58. — History of Design. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10:30. 
A lecture course upon the history of ornament. Griffith. 

59. — Artistic Photography. No credit. Second semester, at 10:30. 
A course upon the use of photography in artistic expression. Griffith. 

* Absent on leave. 



132 The College. 



ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE. 

Professor: Boynton (Chairman of Department). 
Associate Professor : Duffus. 
Assistant Professors : Isk, Ferguson, 



Lecturer in Accounting: J. D. M. Crockett, C. P. A. 

Equipment. Instruction in this department is conducted chiefly by- 
lectures, and reading and investigation in the library, aided in the ele- 
mentary courses by textbooks. The University library contains about 
3,500 volumes relating to the courses of instruction, and a fair collection 
of special reports and documents for research work. All of the principal 
economic journals are on file in the reading rooms. In addition, there 
are charts, maps, and outlines. A limited amount of investigation of 
social and economic conditions is carried on. 

Advice as to Courses. Economics 1 is an essential foundation for and 
a prerequisite to all other courses in economics and commerce. Economics 
2 and 3 lay a foundation for nearly all of the advanced courses and should 
be taken by all who expect to elect more than a few units in the depart- 
ment. 

Requirements for a Major. The Elements of Economics (1 or 90), 
and the Economic and Financial History of the United States (3), are 
prescribed for all major students. Major students wishing a general 
course, or planning to take a graduate course, are advised, in fulfilling 
the requirements for graduation, to elect from the following fundamental 
courses: Money (50), Banking (51), History and Organization of Trans- 
portation (55), Railway Rates and Regulation (56), Corporations and 
Trusts (57), Public Finance (61 and 62), Statistics (68), Labor Prob- 
lems (70), Economics of Agriculture (80), History of Economic Thought 
(91), and Distribution of Wealth (92). Those who wish to make special 
preparation for some vocation should elect studies in addition to those 
required of all major students in accordance with the suggestions made 
below. 

Suggested Special Groups. By a judicious combination of courses 
in the department of economics and commerce, and other departments of 
the College and the technical schools of the University, those wishing to 
make special preparation for some vocation can secure the more import- 
ant courses given in the separate schools of commerce of other institu- 
tions. Such students should elect courses more liberally in the depart- 
ment than those who wish only a general major, or plan to take a grad- 
uate course. They should, also, early in their College course, consult 
with the faculty of the department with reference to the election of work 
in other departments. Upon graduation, those who complete not less 
than 35 hours, including all italicized subjects in one of the special groups 
numbered II, III, IV, V, and VI, provided they display good ability and 
in other respects merit high commendation, receive a special certificate 
from the department. 

I. Training for Commercial Teaching. In completing their major re- 
quirements those wishing to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in 
high schools should take Commercial Geography (4), Business Organi- 
zation and Management (54), Business Law (69), Money (50), Banking 
(51), Corporation and Trusts (57), and Accounting (64 and 65). 
Teachers of commercial subjects are expected to know stenography and 
typewriting. These are not taught in the College, but a knowledge of 
them should be acquired. 

II. General Business Training Those who wish a general business 
course should take Business Organization and Management (54), Money 
(50), Banking (51), Corporation and Trusts (57), Labor Problems (70), 
Insurance (60), Business Law (69), and Accounting (64 and 65). They 
should also elect advertising (journalism 55 and 56), and in meeting 



Economics and Commerce. 133 

their group requirements, should elect psychology, logic, and more than 
one course in English composition. 

III. Training fo-r Banking. Those who plan to prepare for banking 
should take Money (50), Banking (51), Banking Practice (52), Invest- 
ments (53), Corporations and Trusts (57), Business Law (69), and 
Accoxinting (64 and 65). 

IV. Training for Railway Administration. Those who expect to enter 
the field of railway transportation should take Business Organization and 
Management (54), History of Transportation (55), Railway Rates (56), 
Corporations and Tmtsts (57), Statistics (68), Business Law (69), 
Markets and Marketing (81), and Accounting (64, 65 and 66) ; they are 
advised to elect courses in civil or mechanical engineering also. 

V. Training for Commerce. Those who expect to engage in mercantile 
pursuits should take Commercial Geography (4), Markets and Market- 
ing (81), Money (50) , Railway Rates (56) , Business Law (69) , Business 
Organization and Management (54), Corporations and Trusts (57), and 
Accounting (64 and 65). They are advised to elect advertising (journal- 
ism 55 and 56) and psychology 1. 

VI Training for Accounting. Those who expect to enter the practice 
of accounting should take Accounting (64, 65, 66 and 67), Statistics (68), 
Business Organization and Management (54), Corporations and Trusts 
(57), and Business Law (69). 

VII Training for Public Service. Those preparing for public service 
should take Statistics (68), Public Finance (61 and 62), Labor Problems 
(70), Public Utilities (59), and Corporations and Trusts (57). They 
should elect liberally in sociology and political science. 

VIII. Training for Social Service. Those who plan to engage in some 
branch of social service should take Statistics (68), Labor Problems (70), 
Labor Legislation (71), Immigration (72), and Distribution of Wealth 
(92), and should elect several courses in sociology and political science. 

IX. Economics as Preliminary to the Study of Law. Many of the 
courses in economics and commerce will be found to be valuable in pre- 
paring for the study of law. Major students who expect to enter the 
legal profession should take Corporations and Trusts (57), Public Utili- 
ties (59), Public Finance (61), Money (50), Banking (51), Investments 
(53), and Labor Problems (70). 

1. — Elements of Economics. Five hours credit. Both semesters, 
at 8, 9, 10, 11, 1, and 2. This course is essentially a concrete analytical 
study of the laws governing man in his relation to wealth. It not only 
furnishes the basis for the scientific understanding of economic affairs, 
but serves as the foundation for all other courses in economics. Not 
open to Juniors and Seniors. (See 90.) 

Duffus, Ise, Ferguson, , . 

2. — Economic History of England. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 9. A study of the general development of agriculture, in- 
dustry, and commerce in England from the tenth century to the present 
time. The course is designed to show the gradual evolution of an in- 
dustrial society and to trace those changes by which modern England 
has attained her present economic position. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Boynton. 

3. — Economic and Financial History of the United States. Three 
hours credit. Second semester, at 9. Attention is given to colonial 
agriculture, industry, and trade as an introduction to the course. After 
1789, the main lines of study are the banking, transportation, and 
tariff history of the United States, with special attention to the develop- 
ment of the natural resources, the rise of manufacture, and the ex- 
pansion of corporate methods in industry and trade. Prerequisite, 
course 1. Boynton. 



134 The College. 

4. — Industrial and Commercial Geography. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, at 10. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the 
student with the more important economic aspects of the principal in- 
dustries of the world. The course is primarily a concrete, descriptive 
study of the geographical division of labor and the differences in natural 
resources, labor conditions, available capital, and business enterprise 
which largely determine this division. The chief products of the different 
countries and international trade in them are studied. Prerequisite, 
course 1. Duffus. 

5.* — European Industry and Commerce During the Nineteenth 
Century I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 9. Agrarian, in- 
dustrial and commercial development of Europe in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. The agrarian movement and depression, the industrial revolution, 
the development of commerce and shipping, a brief consideration of ship- 
ping subsidies, industrial combinations and state policies regarding them, 
and tariff policies of the chief European countries. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Ise. 

6.* — European Industry and Commerce During the Nineteenth 
Century II. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 9. A continuation 
of course 5, which must have been completed. Ise. 

10. — The Economics of the War. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 9. The course is intended to treat in particular the economic 
problems involved in and growing out of the war. Attention will be 
directed to the war-time regulation of trade and industry, the control of 
supplies and of transportation, and in particular to the subject of war 
finance. The course will conclude with a study of the problems incident 
to demoblization and of the various programs of reconstruction. Pre- 
requisite, course 1. Boynton. 

50. — Money. Three hours credit. First semester, at 10. The evolu- 
tion of coinage and of monetary systems; the production, distribution 
and functions of the precious metals; value theories of money, issues of 
paper money by governments and by banks; credit and its relation to 
money; domestic and foreign exchange; prices and their fluctuations 
constitute the main features of the course. The historical background, 
where possible, is emphasized. Prerequisite, course 1. Boynton. 

51. — Banking. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 10. The 
principles of banking are studied, special attention being given to the 
Relation of banking to credit operations,. A comparative study is 
made of the banking systems of the' United States, Great Britain, 
France, Germany, and Canada, including their historical development. 
Special consideration is given to the Federal Reserve System of the 
United States. Prerequisite, course 50. Boynton. 

52. — Banking Practice. ■ Two hours credit. First semester, at 10. 
A study of the organization and operation of commercial banks, savings 
banks, trust companies, and investment banking, including the function 
of commercial paper houses and note brokers. The nature of banking 
and mercantile credit is analyzed as well as the broader relation of bank- 
ing to the money market. Prerequisite, course 51. Boynton. 

53. — Investments. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10. A 
study of the various fields of investments, including railway, mining, 
and industrial securities, and the bonds of governments and municipali- 
ties, with special attention to the merits of particular stocks, bonds, 
mortgages, etc. The work of investment banking houses will likewise 
be considered. The aim of the course is to determine, so far as possible, 
the elements of a wise and conservative investment. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Boynton. 

54.— Business Organization and Management. Three hours credit. 
First semester, at 1. This course treats of general business organi- 
zation and management, as well as the organization of the business of 



Economics and Commerce. 135 

the bank, the factory, and the general office. The organization and 
working of the industrial and commercial corporation are given special 
consideration. Prerequisite, course 1. 

55. — History and Organization of Transportation. Two hours 
credit. First semester, at 11. Canal construction and the develop- 
ment of the railway net of the United States; railroad finance and or- 
ganization; problems of railway maintenance and methods of conducting 
transportation ; accounts and reports illustrating railway operations ; a 
comparative study of railway practices in other countries. Prerequisite, 
course 1. Should be preceded by course 3. Boynton. 

56. — Railway Rates and Regulation. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11. A study of the theory of railway rates, and of rate- 
making in practice; problems of local and personal discrimination; ad- 
justments due to geographical location and market competition; railway 
agreements; state railway commissions and the Interstate Commerce 
Commission; recent legislation, state and national, relating to railway 
transportation. Prerequisite, course 55. Boynton. 

57. — Corporations and Trusts. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 9. A general course dealing mainly with the financial side 
of large corporations, and concluding with a study of the economic- causes 
and consequences of the combination movement in industry. The lead- 
ing topics treated are: internal organization, promotion, capitalization, 
financing, and reorganization of corporations; and the orgin, develop- 
ment and legal status of trusts. Consideration is given throughout to in- 
terrelated corporation and trust problems. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Ferguson. 

59. — Public Utilities. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 
The topics studied are: problems of water, lighting, heating, and tele- 
phone service; street and interurban railway transportation; public 
ownership versus regulated private ownership; the determination of 
reasonable rates and adequate service; public utility reports and ac- 
counts. Prerequisite, course 1. Duffus. 

60. — Insurance. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 8. A 
study of (a) the general economic nature of risk and the theory of 
insurance; (b) the organized business of fire insurance rating, the 
calculation of insurance premiums, reserves, investment of funds, etc.; 
and (c) the relation of the state to insurance. Students desiring to do so 
will be permitted to devote part of their time to forms of insurance other 
than fire and life. Prerequisite, course 1. Duffus. 

61. — Public Finance I. Principles. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 8. A general introduction to the science of finance. Attention 
is given chiefly to the various kinds of public revenues, to general theories 
and principles of taxation, and to the justice and incidence of taxa- 
tion. Prerequisite, course 1. Ferguson. 

62. — Public Finance II. Practice. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester at 8. Application of general principles of pubic finance to a con- 
sideration of actual systems of taxation, with special reference to prac- 
tical American problems. Public expenditures and public debts are dealt 
with at some length. The course concludes with a study of the fiscal 
organization of the state and of budgets, national, state, and local. Pre- 
requisite, course 61. Ferguson. 

64. — Accounting I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 2. Theory 
and practice of modern accounting, applicable to the single proprietorship 
and partnership form of business. Prerequisite, course 1. Ferguson. 

65. — Accounting II. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 2. 
Prerequisite, course 64. Review and further development of Account- 
ing I. Special problems in connection with partnerships, interest, and 
depreciation. Corporation accounts, stock issues, dividends* sinking 
funds, and reserves. Ferguson. 



136 The College. 

66. — Cost Accounting. Two hours credit. First semester, at 2. 
Prerequisite, courses 64 and 65. The elements of cost. Cost records an 
integral part of the general accounting system. The control of material. 
Different wage systems. The allocation of expenditures to various units 
of production in different lines of industry. 

67. — Advanced Accounting and Auditing. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 2. Prerequisite, courses 64 and 65. C. P. A. problems. 
Duties and responsibilities of the auditor. General procedure and 
method. Balance sheet audit, detailed audit, verification of assets and 
liabilities. 

68. — Statistics. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 9. Statis- 
tical averages. Graphic representation. Deviation. Correlation. Ap- 
plication of statistical methods to the study of prices, population, wages, 
and general business facts. Prerequisite, course 1. Ferguson. 

69. — Business Law. Three hours credit. Second semester at 11. 
The elementary principles of law relating to business transactions. The 
essentials of contracts, agency, bailments, sales, negotiable instruments, 
corporations and real property. Emphasis is laid upon the legal problems 
which arise in everyday business. Prerequisite, course 1. Ferguson. 

70.— Labor Problems. Two hours credit. First semester, at 8. 
After a discussion of the nature, genesis and development of modern 
labor problems, the history, growth, policies, and practices of trade unions 
are studied, with special reference to the United States. Prerequisite, 
course 1. Duffus. 

71. — Labor Legislation. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 8. 
A continuation of course 70. Among the topics studied are : com- • 
pulsory arbitration, hours of labor, the minimum wage, workmen's com- 
pensation acts, safety legislation, health insurance, old-age pensions, un- 
employment and its remedies, and the labor of women and children. 
Prerequisite, course 70 or its equivalent. Duffus. 

71a. — Labor Problems of the Reconstruction Period. Two hours 
credit. Second semester, at 8. Designed as a temporary substitute 
for course 71, this course takes up the same problems but deals more 
intensively with these which are pressing for immediate solution in the 
United States and Great Britain. Prerequisite, course 1. Duffus. 

72. — Immigration Problems. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
10. The course is concerned with the history of immigration to the 
United States, its causes, character, geographical distribution, economic 
effects of immigration, pauperism, and the problem of assimilation. The 
special problems of oriental immigration and the question of immigration 
policy will also be studied. Prerequisite, course 1. 

73. — Modern Economic Reform. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 10. This course will treat of modern movements for economic 
reform, including the single tax, agrarian reform, cooperation, profit- 
sharing, syndicalism, socialism, and communism, with a critical discussion 
of present and proposed methods of distribution and economic organiza- 
tion. Prerequisite, course 1. Ise. 

80. — Economics of Agriculture. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 1. The principal topics studied are: private property in land; 
the public-land policy of the United States and its economic consequences ; 
organization of the productive factors; size of farms, land values, and 
tenancy; rural credit; marketing; cooperative organization among farm- 
ers. Special attention is given to conditions in Kansas. Prerequisite, 
course 1. . I se « 

81. — Markets and Marketing. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11. Summarized history of marketing organization; principal types 
of present-day markets and marketing agencies; the functions of the 
middleman in the distribution of the products of farm and factory; 



Engineering. 137 

organized speculation in farm products; the organization of domestic and 
ioreign trade; various proposals for improving marketing methods. Pre- 
requisite, course 1. Duffus. 

90. — Elements of Economics. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. The same as course 1, except that it is designed especially to 
meet the needs of Juniors and Seniors. Ise. 

91. — History of Economic Thought. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 9. The history of economic doctrines in ancient, mediaeval and 
modern times. A study of the doctrines of the Greeks, Romans, school- 
men and canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats, and of the later classical, 
mathematical, Austrian, and historical schools. Prerequisite, course 1 or 
90. Ise. 

92. — The Distribution of Wealth. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 9. This course is designed to give mature students of eco- 
nomics a firm grasp of the more important economic principles. The 
theories of value and prices and of distribution are studied in the light of 
current schools of thought. Prerequisite, course 1 or 90. Ise. 

EDUCATION. 

The following courses in the School of Education are open to College 
students who do not elect courses from other professional schools, but 
not more than fifteen hours and a course in senior teaching may be 
counted towards the degree of bachelor of arts. Students desiring ad- 
mission to any of these courses must register in the School of Education 
as well as the College, and will be admitted to the classes as students of 
the School of Education. 

Courses in education, of which detailed descriptions will be found in 
Section IX, are arranged in the following five groups. College students 
may not offer more than seven hours in any one group : 

Historical group: numbers 50, 51, 59, 60, and 63. 

Theoretical group: numbers 1, 54, 55, 64, 65, 67, 68, 69, 71, 75, 78, 
and 79. 

Administrative group: numbers 2, 52, 53, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 66, 70, 
72, 73, 74, and 77. 

Teachers' Courses: numbers 80, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 
95, 97 and 99. 

Senior Teaching: numbers 80a, 81a, 83a, 84a, 85a, 86a, 87a, 88a, 
89a, 90a, 91a, 95a, 96a, 966, 96c, 97a, 99a. 

ENGINEERING 

The following courses in the School of Engineering are open to College 
students who do not elect courses from other professional schools, but 
not more than fifteen hours may be counted towards the degree of 
bachelor of arts. Students desiring admission to any of these courses 
must register in the School of Engineering as well as in the College, and 
will be admitted to the classes as engineering students: 

C. E. 1. — Surveying. Three hours credit. First semester, Tu. Th., 
at 10 to 11, with field work at 1 to 4. Prerequisite, plane trigonometry. 

C. E. 2. — Surveying. Three hours credit. Second semester. A con- 
tinuation of the preceding course. 

Eng. Dr. 3. — Descriptive Geometry. Three hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. 

C. E. 52. — City Planning. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

C. E. 70. — Sanitary Engineering I. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 



138 The College. 

C. E, 71.— Sanitary Engineering II. Four hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

C. E. 73.— Sanitary Science and Public Health. Two hours credit. 
First semester. 

C. E. 75.— Roads and Pavements. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

E. E. 50.— Dynamo Machinery Three hours credit. First semester. 
E. E. 51.— Theory of Alternating Currents. Five hours credit. 
Second semester. 

M. E. 51.— Thermodynamics. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Ind. Eng. 51. — Industrial Engineering II. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Ind. Eng. 52. — Industrial Administration. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Mech. 50. — Mechanics. Five hours credit. Both semesters. 
Mech. 51. — Strength of Materials. Five hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. 

Mech. 55. — Hydraulics. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 

. A. E. 5. — History of Architecture I. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

A. E. 6. — History of Architecture II. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Min. E. 53. — Ore Dressing. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 
Min. E. 68. — Elements of Mining. Three hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Professors: Dunlap (Head of Department), Hopkins, 

O'Leary. 
Associate Professors : Whitcomb, Sisson, Johnson, 

Lynn, Raymond. f 
Assistant Professors: Gardner, Burnham, Morgan.. 
Instructors: Winston, Brown, Laird, Hoopes, Wattles, t 

Swenson,* Wilson, Barnes. 

Equipment. Apart from a number of portraits and historical maps, 
the equipment for this department is the University Library, in which 
are collections of volumes and periodicals relating especially to rhetoric 
and composition, to English literature, and to the English language. 
There are complete sets of journals, such as Anglia and Englische 
Studien, and the publications of the Early English Text Society, the 
Chaucer Society, the English and American Dialect SocietieSj the Spenser 
Society, the Shakspere Society, the New Shakspere Society, the Shel- 
ley Society, the Browning Society, and others. The library also possesses 
the Shakspere Jahrbuch, and facsimiles of the quartos and folios of 
Shakspere. The total number of volumes pertaining to the subjects in 
this department is 13,573. Of these 1,281 are devoted to Shakspere, 
8,330 to other English literature, 766 to English philology, and 3,010 to 
American literature. 

Prerequisites: Courses 1, 2, 10, and 11, or their equivalents, must be 
completed before the student can be admitted to any other courses in 
the department; and courses 12-14 or 13-15, scheduled for the Sopho- 
more year, or their equivalent, are prerequisite to all succeeding courses 
in English literature. In special cases, Juniors or Seniors may be al- 
lowed, with the consent of the department, to take an advanced course in 
connection with 12, 13, 14, or 15. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. t Assigned to School of Engineering. 



English Language and Literature. 139 

RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 

1, — Rhetoric I.** Three hours credit. First semester, at 8, 9, 10, 
11, 1, 2, 3. Written exercises, with study of language usage. Required 
of all Freshmen in the College not offering for entrance a fourth unit in 
English Composition. Gardner and assistants. 

2. — Rhetoric II.** Two hours credit. Second semester, at 8, 9, 10, 
11, 1, 2, 3. A continuation of course 1. Required of all Freshmen in 
the College not offering for entrance a fourth unit in English composition. 

Gardner and assistants. 

Credit for courses 1 and 2 is given provisionally and will be with- 
drawn for subsequent use of notably bad English. 

3. — The Principles of Argumentation.* Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 2:30; second semester, at 10. The general principles of 
logic as applied in discourse, with briefs and exercises. 

Hopkins, Laird. 

50. — Narration and Description. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, at 8, 9, 10. A study of general principles, with exercises. A funda- 
mental course, recommended as preparation for English 55 to 58, in- 
clusive. O'Leary, Lynn. 

51. — Narration and Description. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 8 and 9. Prerequisite, course 50. O'Leary, Lynn. 

52 — Exposition. Two hours credit. First semester, at 9. A study of 
general principles, with outlines and exercises. A fundamental course 
recommended as preparation for English 55 to 58, inclusive. Gardner. 

53. — Advanced Argument. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 2. Prerequisite, course 3. Hopkins. 

55. — Literary Criticism. Two hours credit. First semester, at 1. A 
study of the principles and methods of criticism through its literature, 
with practice in book reviewing and in critical writing. Hopkins. 

56. — Versification. One hour credit. First semester, Monday, at 3. 
A study of the forms and priciples of English verse, with exercises. 

Hopkins. 

57. — Essay Writing. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10. A 
study of general principles, with exercises. O'Leary. 

58. — Prose Invention. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 1. A 
general survey of theories of literary art, with practice in original pro- 
duction. Library and conference course, with required thesis. Pre- 
requisites, one or more advanced courses in English composition. 

Hopkins. 
LANGUAGE. 

60. — Elementary Old English. Three hours credit. Both semesters 
at 3. Old English grammar, with reading of West Saxon prose texts. 

Burnham. 

61. — Beowulf. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 3. Prerequi- 
site, course 60. Burnham. 

62. — Middle English. Two hours credit. First semester, at 2. 
Language and literature of the fourteenth century, exclusive of Chaucer. 
Prerequisite, course 60. Burnham. 

63. — Middle English. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 1. 
Reading of Middle English texts, with study of the development of the 
English language, its sounds, inflections, and syntax. Prerequisite, 
course 60. Burnham. 

68. — Modern English Grammar. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. A course chiefly practical, for intending teachers. Open only to 
qualified applicants after consultation with the instructor. Burnham. 



140 The College. 

70. — English Usage. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 2. Con- 
sideration of the principles governing usage, and of specific problems in 
contemporary English. Burnham. 

LITERATURE. 

10. — English Literature. Two hours credit. First semester at 8, 9, 
10, 11, 1, 2. A study of representative authors. Prerequisite for all 
other courses in the department above 11, except in the case of students 
who offer for entrance a fourth unit in English literature. 

Johnson and assistants. 

11. — English Literature. Three hours credit. Second semester, 8, 
9, 10, 11, 1, 2. A study of representative authors. Prerequisite for all 
later courses in the department, except in the case of students who offer 
for entrance a fourth unit in English literature. 

Johnson and assistants. 

12 and 13. — History of English Literature.* 12, three hours credit. 
13, two hours credit. The two courses begin at the same point. First se- 
mester, at 8, 9, 10, 11. Prerequisite, English 1, 2, 10, and 11. 

Lynn and assistants. 

14 and 15. — History of English Literature.* 14, two hours credit; 
15, three hours credit. Second semester, at 8, 9, 10, 11. Prerequisites, 
English 1, 2, 10, and 11. Course 14 is a continuation of course 12, and 
course 15 of course 13. Lynn and assistants. 

71. — American Literature I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. General history, with special reference to the work of the chief 
American poets. Hopkins 

72. — American Literature II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 1. A study of later writers and of current literature, with special 
reference to fiction. Hopkins. 

73. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Two hours 
credit. First semester, at 9. The period covered is that from 1660 to 
approximately 1735. O'Leary. 

74. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Three hours 
credit. Second semester, at 9. Covers the period from approximately 
1735 to 1798. O'Leary. 

75. — Victorian Literature. Exclusive of the novel and Tennyson and 
Browning. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10. Dunlap. 

76. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours 
credit. First semester, at 11. Prose, exclusive of the novel. The authors 
studied are Lamb, De Quincey, Hazlitt, Newman, Landor, Ruskin, and 
Stevenson. Dunlap. 

77. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours, 
credit. Second semester, at 9. Poetry. The authors studied are Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Southey, Byron, Arnold, Tennyson, and Browning. 

Dunlap. 

78. — Shakspere. Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 10. Inter- 
pretation of three plays. Dunlap. 

79. — Chaucer. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9. Neither Old 
nor Middle English required for entrance. Careful reading of the Pro- 
logue, Knightes Tale, and the Nonne Preestes Tale; rapid reading of a 
large part of the Canterbury Tales. Dunlap. 

80. — Shelley and Keats. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
11. Lectures, and interpretation of selected poems. Dunlap. 

81. — Browning and Tennyson. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 8. Interpretative study of selected poems, with general view of the 
work of both authors. Lynn. 



Entomology. 141 

82. — Carlyle and Emerson. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
9. The characteristics of each man's work and its relation to nineteenth 
century thought. Lectures and class reports. (Given in 1920 and each 
alternate year following.) Johnson. 

83. — Milton and His Contemporaries. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 9. The poetry and prose of Milton with supplementary study 
of representative contemporary authors. (Given in 1921 and each alter- 
nate year following.) Johnson. 

84. — The Modern English Lyric. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 3. A representative body of English lyrics will be studied in the class- 
room, with attention to the general criticism of lyric poetry. 

Whitcomb. 

85. — Technic and Theory of the Drama. Two hours credit. First 
semester, at 2. Study of dramatic dialogue, diction, characterization, and 
stage presentation. Lectures and weekly exercises in criticism or com- 
position. Whitcomb. 

86. — History of the English Drama. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 8. From the early liturgical plays to 1642. Study of 
origins and influences; the growth of types; stage history; and reading 
and criticism of about thirty plays. Lectures and written reports. 

Johnson. 

87. — History of the English Drama. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 2. English dramatic history from 1642 to the present time, 
with special attention given to Victorian and post-Victorian drama. 

Whitcomb. 

88. — The English Novel. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
11. A historical and critical survey of the English novel, from Defoe 
to Meredith. Lectures on the growth and development of the novel. 
Study of selected typical novels, illustrative of important phases of fiction. 

Dunlap. 

89. — The English Essay. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
9. A study, historical- and critical, of the essay as a literary form, 
from Bacon to the present time. . O'Leary. 

91. — Biography and Autobiography. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 1. A study of the values and problems of the individual 
life, as suggested by the detailed records of significant lives. 

Whitcomb. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Professor: Hunter (Head of Department). 
Associate Professor : Hungerford. 
Instructor: Lawson. 
Research Assistant : Tapager. 

Equipment. The arrangement of the laboratories is such as to pro- 
vide for (1) general instruction: (2) research work in serial-breeding 
experiments and conditions governing development. Special thermal reg- 
ulators for determination of influence of temperature on development are 
used in these researches. A feature of great value is the recent comple- 
tion of the cross-reference card index to the current entomological litera- 
ture. An insectary with greenhouse adjoining has, in addition to 
regular insectary equipment, special facilities for the study of aquatic 
life. The extensive collections, both biologic and systematic, offer ex- 
ceptional facilities for comprehensive instruction in the various groups. 
A more extended notice of these collections will be found under the head 
of Museums. A large series of cabinets has been especially arranged 
to aid in teaching. These are supplemented by models illustrating 
developmental processes. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. The courses in entomology are de- 
signed to meet the needs of three classes of students: (1) The general 



142 The College. 

student who desires a fuller knowledge and appreciation of the biological 
problems illustrated by insect life; (2) the student who is preparing to 
teach botany, zoology or general biology in the high school; (3) and the 
special student who is preparing to become a teacher or investigator. 
For the first class, courses 1, 2, 3, and 53 are recommended; for the sec- 
ond class in addition to these, courses 51, 58, and 60. For the third 
class, after the completion of the four fundamental courses, the aims of 
each student will largely determine the selection of advanced courses. 
Students majoring in the department are recommended to take after 
course 58, Protozoology 71. The advice of the department is that such 
selection shall be made only after consultation. 

1. — Introductory Entomology I. Five hours credit. Both semesters, 
two sections, 9 to 10, M. W. F., 8 to 10, Tu. Th, and 10 to 11, M. W. F., 
10 to 12, Tu. Th. A general course in life and behavior of insects and 
other arthropods, and their relations to plants and other animals. A 
field, laboratory and lecture course with recitations designed for the 
general student. Fee, $1. Hungerford and assistants. 

2. — Introductory Entomology II. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 9 to 10, M. W. F. ; 8 to 10, Tu. Th. This course is a continuation 
of Entomology I, and during the present period special emphasis will 
be given to those forms and problems which have a direct bearing on 
food conservation. Prerequisite, course 1. Hungerford. 

3. — Morphology of Insects I.* Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, 10 to 12. A course presenting the more general features of the 
form and structure of a few representative insects. Laboratory study, 
lectures, and assigned readings. Prerequisite, course 1 or equivalent. 
Fee, $1.50. Lawson. 

50. — Introductory Entomology. Five hours credit. First semester 
at 1 to 2, M. W. F.; 1 to 3, Tu. Th. A general course in life and behavior 
of insects and other arthropods, and their relations to plants and other 
animals. A field, laboratory, and lecture course with recitations. Not 
open to students who have had course 1. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

51. — Morphology of Insects II. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 10 to 12. A study of the internal structure and development of 
a few representative types of insects, and their bearing upon physiologi- 
cal processes of life. Prerequisites, entomology, 1 and 2, or equivalent. 
Fees, $1.50. Lawson. 

52. — Systematic Entomology. Two hours credit. Both semesters, 
1 to 3. This course gives special prominence to the systematic position 
of the orders studied. The laboratory work consists of the classification 
of insects, and is accompanied by studies in the life history of the various 
forms identified. Prerequisite, entomology 1, 2, and 3, or equivalent. 
Fee, $1. Lawson. 

53. — Biology of the Arthropoda. Two hours credit. First semester, 
3. This course, conducted in field and laboratory, deals with ecology, 
adaptation to environment, mode of life, and such other general biologi- 
cal studies as illustrated in the lives of insects and other arthropods. 
Prerequisites, course 1 and 2, or equivalent. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

54. — Advanced Morphology and Histology of Insects. Three hours 
credit. Both semesters, 1 to 3. Prerequisites, courses 1, 2, and 51. 
Fee, $1.50. Hunter. 

55. — Taxonomy of Insects. Three hours credit. Both semesters, by 
appointment. A continuation of course 52, enabling the student to under- 
take the serious study of some one family. Students qualified to take this 
course are afforded an opportunity to work with material secured on 
the biological survey trip of the previous summer. (Special study of the 
Coccidae may be elected in this course.) Prerequisite, entomology 1, 2 
and 3. Fee, $1. . Lawson. 



Geology. 143 

56. — Applied Entomology I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
11. Lectures, recitations, and observations in the field on forms of 
economic value; life histories, habits, and methods of combating; the in- 
jurious forms, and of utilizing the beneficial. Prerequisite, course 1 and 
2, or equivalent. Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

57. — Applied Entomology II. Two hours credit. Second semester 
at 11. A continuation of course 56. This course deals especially with 
those insects that are intimately associated with the household, the 
garden, and the farmyard. Course 56, which deals with the insects of 
farm and orchard crops, is not a prerequisite for this course, which is 
nontechnical, and is intended for the general student. Hungerford. 

58. — Insects and Public Health. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 10. A study of the relations of insects and other arthropods to public 
health. A lecture, recitation, and demonstration course for the purpose of 
acquainting the student with those forms which are liable to transmit 
human diseases. 

60. — Agriculture. Two hours credit. First semester, at 8. This 
course deals with insects injurious to crops. This course should be taken 
in combination with botany 60. Hungerford. 

61. — Field Entomology and Insectary Methods. Two hours credit, 
3 to 5. Second semester. This course is conducted in field and insectary, 
and involves a study of methods of collecting and of rearing insects. It 
is intended to serve two purposes; first, to give those intending' to 
teach biology some knowledge of the handling of the material most 
available for their work; and second, to afford some training to those 
who purpose to carry on experiment-station work. Prerequisite, Ento- 
mology 1 and 2, and one course in applied entomology, or its equivalent. 
Fee, $1. Hungerford. 

GEOLOGY. 

Professor: Hawoeth (Head of Department). 
Associate Professor : Moore. 
Assistant Professors : Todd, Haynes. 
Instructor : Ellisor. 

General Statement. The department of geology offers training in a 
number of divisions of earth science, which, while more or less closely 
related to one another, are nevertheless to a certain extent independent 
sciences. These may be indicated conveniently 1 as follows: (1) General 
gology and geography, (2) historical geology and paleontology, (3) 
economic geology, and (4) mineralogy and petrology. Courses in the 
department may be grouped with reference to the following classes of 
students: (a) those wishing to acquire knowledge of the structure, com- 
position and history of the earth, as a part of a liberal education; (6) 
those expecting to engage in professional work along some geologic line, 
(1) as a petroleum geologist, or (2) in geology applied to mining; (c) 
those desiring to prepare for teaching in secondary schools; and (d) 
those who feel the need of geologic knowledge as an aid to the interpre- 
tation of facts of other sciences or branches of learning. 

Advice as to Courses. It is desirable that every student decide, at 
least before his Junior year, the particular field of geology in which he 
wishes to specialize. Students who desire to follow any of the lines of 
training previously mentioned may be guided by the following outlines: 

a.— General Geology: 1, 2 (or 2a) and 26, 30, 50, 51, 61, 62, 71 or 72. 

6 (1) .—Petroleum Geology: 1, 2 (or 2a) and 26, 30, 50, 51, 61, 62, 71, 
73. 

b (2) .—Mining Geology: 1, 2 (or 2a) and 26, 30, 31, 51, 61, 70, 71, 
72, 81, 82. 

c. — Teaching in Secondary Schools: 1, 2 (or 2a) and 26, 30, 50, 51, 54, 
55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 70. 



144 The College. 

d. — Geology as a minor: 1, 2 (or 2a) and 26. Additional courses re- 
lated to the major subject. 

Equipment. The department of geology is located in Haworth Hall, 
a three-story building with laboratories, museums, lecture rooms, and 
library. The laboratories contain abundant material for class work in 
the study of minerals, rocks, and topographic and geologic maps. A very 
extensive collection of minerals and rocks arranged in systematic order, 
and a large collection of invertebrate fossils, are exhibited in the depart- 
ment museum. In the class rooms are cases with topographic and geologic 
wall maps, and models of topographic forms, together with a reflecto- 
scope and lantern slides and reference collections of rocks, minerals, and 
fossils. The library contains all the principal works on geology and 
mining, including their various subdivisions, sets of federal, state and 
foreign geologic reports, and American and foreign geologic periodicals. 

Prerequisites. Courses in geology Nos. 2 (or 2a) and 26, are pre- 
requisite for all subsequent geology courses in the College excepting 30, 
31, and 70. Students wishing to specialize in mineralogy, petrology and 
economic geology should take as much chemistry as their courses will per- 
mit; students wishing to specialize in historical geology and paleontology 
should take special work in zoology. It is highly desirable that students 
majoring in geology should have taken elementary chemistry and physics 
by the close of their Junior year, or earlier if possible. Group require- 
ments for Freshman-Sophomores may be satisfied by geology courses 1, 
2 (or 2a) and 26, or I and 30 

GENERAL GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY. 

1. — Physical Geography. Three hours credit. Each semester, at 9 
or 11, with one laboratory period per week, from 1 to 3 on Tuesday. 
An elementary course on the physical features of the earth, including 
a consideration of their origin and the agencies producing changes; the 
evolution of land forms. Occasional short field trips will be made. For 
students not offering Physical Geography for entrance. Moore, Haynes. 

2 (or 2a) . — Elementary Geology. Three hours credit. Each semester, 
at 8 or 10, with one laboratory period per week, from 1 to 3 on Wednesday. 
A study of the elements of the science, including a general outline of 
geologic principles and agencies. An acquaintance with elementary 
chemistry is very desirable in this course. Prerequisite, geology 1. 
This course must be accompanied by 26. Moore, Haynes. 

26. — Introductory Historical Geology. Two hours credit. Each 
semester, at 8 or 10, with one laboratory period per week, from 1 to 3 
on Thursday. A study of the more important events in the past history 
of the earth, as a basis for the correct understanding of the present 
geography, rock structure, and natural resources of the world. Pre- 
requisite, geology 1. This course must be accompanied by 2 (or 2a) . 

Moore. 

30. Geologic Processes. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11. 

An advanced course comprising a critical investigation of geologic 
agencies and the results of their work. The development of land forms 
and the principles of sedimentation will be studied, and the physiographic 
history of specific areas considered. Library and laboratory study, with 
special opportunity for training in the methods of geologic work. Pre- 
requisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26, and elementary physics and chem- 
istry. Moore, Haynes. 

51. Geologic and Topographic Maps. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester at 11. A study chiefly in the laboratory, designed to give the stu- 
dent a thorough understanding of geologic and topographic maps and the 
ability to interpret them correctly, a very important part of the train- 
ing of a geologist. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. 

Moore, Haynes. 



Geology. 145 

52. — Field Geology. Six hours credit. Summer Session. A five 
weeks' course devoted to a study of the geology and physiography of 
parts of Kansas and Colorado, with detailed investigation of special 
areas. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. Registration only after 
consultation with the instructors. Moore, Haynes. 

53. — Field Geology Report. An additional credit of three hours will 
be given for a satisfactory thesis based upon the work of course 52. 

54. — Elements of Geography. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 8. An introductory study of the earth with special reference to 
the relation of its physical features to life, especially to human life. The 
response of life to environment is investigated by study of the chief 
natural regions of earth. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. 

Moore, Haynes. 
55. — Elementary Meteorology. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. A brief course on the causes and effects of atmospheric condi- 
tions, such as changes of temperatures, winds, humidity, clouds, rain, and * 
storms. An understanding of the weather and its effect on man's activ- 
ities is given. Prerequisite, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. (Not given in 
1919-'20.) Haynes. 

56. — Climates. Two hours credit. First semester, at 1. A study 
of the elements and control of climates, the natural climatic provinces 
of the world and the importance of climatic influences on man, as con- 
trolling factors in distribution of population, occupations, customs and 
diseases. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. (Not given in 1918-'l9.) 

Haynes. 
57. — Geography of North America. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 1. A study of the relation of the continent to the world as a 
whole; the physical features of the continent, its climates and the char- 
acter and distribution of its natural resources ; the influence of geographic 
conditions in the development and life of the different countries. Pre- 
requisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

Moore, Haynes. 
58. — Geography of South America. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 1. The physical features, climates and resources of the con- 
tinent; their effects on the development and prospects of the different 
countries. Special consideration is given to the geographic factors in- 
volved in trade between the United States and South America. Pre- 
requisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. (Not given in 1918-'19.) 

Moore, Haynes. 
59. — Geology and Geography of Kansas. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 11. Lectures and library work. A careful study of the 
geology and physical geography of Kansas, including both economic and 
paleontologic studies. Prerequisite, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. 

Haworth, Moore, Todd. 

HISTORICAL GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY. 

60. History of Invertebrate Life. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 9. A consideration of the ancient invertebrate life of the earth, 
its progressive development, its organization into faunas, and the rela- 
tions of these faunas to environment. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) 
and 26. This course should be followed by zoology 61. Moore. 

61. Historical Geology. Five hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 

A study of the geologic history of the earth, the evolution and develop- 
ment of the contingents, stratigraphy and the history of plant and animal 
life from the earliest known beginnings to the present. The geologic 
significance and use of fossils in the identification and correlation of 
stratified rocks will be discussed. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. 
Elementary zoology very desirable. Moore. 

10— K. U.— 5419. 



146 The College. 

62.— Invertebrate Paleontology. Five hours credit. First semester, 
by appointment. A study of the introduction and succession of fossil 
faunas, their composition, and geographic distribution. Practical exercise 
in the identification of faunas of different geologic ages is given. A 
classroom and laboratory course. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. 

Moore. 

ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. 

70. — Mineral Resources of the United States. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, at 11. An introductory course including a general sur- 
vey of the mineral resources of the United States, and a study of the 
geologic conditions under which deposits of commercial value are found. 
Prerequisites, elementary chemistry, and geology 2 (or 2a) and 2b. 

Haworth, Moore, Haynes. 

71. — Structural and Dynamic Geology. Five hours credit. First 
semester at 2. A careful study of geological dynamics and results of 
dynamic actions, particularly on stratified rocks, and latest and best 
methods for field operations while studying same. Prerequisites, geology 
2 (or 2a) and 26. Haworth. 

72. — Economic Geology I. Metals. Five hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 10. A general study of the metallic products of mine, con- 
sidered from a scientific and practical standpoint, including the nature, 
origin, amount and geographic and geologic distribution of the same. 
Prerequisites, elementary chemistry and geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. Lec- 
tures and library work. Haworth, Haynes. 

73. — Economic Geology II. Oil, Gas and Coal. Five hours credit. 
Second semester, at 10. A careful study of oil and gas regarding nature, 
origin, geography and geology and economic importance. Much attention 
is paid to field conditions surrounding different oil fields and best methods 
for understanding same. Prerequisites, elementary chemistry and geology 
2 (or 2a) and 26. Haworth, Haynes. 

MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY. 

30.* — Common Rocks and Minerals. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, Tu. W., 1 to 3. A short course designed to give the student 
familiarity with the common rocks and minerals. Practical identification 
is based chiefly on evident physical characters. The origin and occurrence 
of the minerals are discussed and a practical classification of the rocks 
formulated. Prerequisite, elementary chemistry. Haynes. 

31.* — Elementary Mineralogy. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
M. Th. F., 1 to 4. Six hours laboratory work. A brief course in crystalog- 
raphy, and descriptive and determinative mineralogy including blow- 
pipe analysis. The characteristics of about 150 important minerals will 
be studied. Prerequisite, elementary chemistry. Haynes. 

81. Elements of Petrology. Two hours credit. First semester, by 

appointment. Lithology: structure, texture, mineral and chemical com- 
position, and the manner of formation and occurrence of igneous, sedi- 
mentary, and metamorphic rocks. Geological problems confronting min- 
ing engineers, changes in grade or character of ore deposits. Effect of 
faulting, folding, and intrusions of igneous rocks. This course is adequate 
for all general field determinations and as an aid in prospecting. Pre- 
requisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. Haynes. 

82. — Petrography. Three hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. This course consists of training in the methods of petrographic 
study and includes the macroscopic and microscopic examination of the 
principal rock types and a consideration of the theories of modern 
petrology. Prerequisites, geology 2 (or 2a) and 26. Haynes. 



The College. 147 

german language and literature. 

Professors: Excel, Tin rxau (Chairman of Department). 
Associate Professors: Corbix, Kruse. 
Assistant Professors : Sturtevant, Jones.* 
Instructor : SPANGLER. 

Equipment. The German department has an excellent stereopticon, a 
balopticon, and over 1,000 stereopticon slides, illustrating scenery, cos- 
tumes, and biography; an increasing number of excellent photographs 
and prints in frames ; a complete set of German wall maps showing the 
various separate states, and a few busts. The department has a Co- 
lumbia graphophone and is accumulating a series of speech. records for 
illustration of differing German pronunciation. There are 5,155 volumes 
in the library of the German department, and twenty-one philological and 
literary journals are received. 

The department has also a valuable collection of 3,000 unbound dis- 
sertations and school programs, covering all fields of Germanistic scholar- 
ship. With the present library and this acquisition of special studies 
the German department is prepared to encourage graduate study in 
Germanic languages at the University of Kansas. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Students who plan to major in Ger- 
man should consult with the department before the close of the Sopho- 
more year for special guidance in their subsequent work in German and 
for advice as to courses to be taken in other departments. Courses 1 to 13 
are open to all students of the College. Courses 52 to 59 are open to both 
undergraduates in the College and to graduate students. Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 
must be taken in order. Students majoring in German must elect com- 
position, course 10, which should be taken along with course 5 as a 
preparation for subsequent courses 6 to 13. From these at least one more 
reading course must be taken in preparation for the major group, courses 
50 to 57. 

1. — Elementary German. — Essentials of Grammar. Five hours 
credit. First semester, 10; second semester 10, 1:30 to 3:30. Practice 
in speaking and writing German. With the afternoon division, from 1:30 
to 3:30, the laboratory method is used, requiring two hours classroom 
work and one hour preparation outside. 

Engel, Corbin, Kruse, Spangler. 

2. — German Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit. First semes- 
ter, 9:00. Second semester, 9:00. Selected texts from modern writers of 
short stories, with composition and conversation based upon them. Re- 
view of grammar topics, with exercises. Thurnau, Engel. 

3A. — Intermediate German. Five hours credit. First semester, 
9. Second semester, 9. Selected narrative prose texts with composition 
ard conversation based upon them; introduction to classics. 

Thurnau, Sturtevant. 

3B. — Scientific German. Five hours credit. First semester, 8. A 
thorough review of grammar; Das Edle Blut or equivalent text, 40 to 
50 pages, as introductory reading matter, followed by a scientific Ger- 
man reader. This course is intended for students majoring in Science, 
and may not be counted toward a major in German. The aim of the 
course is to introduce the student to the style and vocabulary of scientific 
German and develop the ability to read simple scientific writings. Pre- 
requisite, ten hours of College German. Kruse. 

4A. — German Classics. Three hours credit. First semester, 11, 
second semester, 11. Selected works from Lessing, Schiller, Goethe. 

Spangler. 

4B. — Scientific German. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 8. 
Reading of scientific German texts in class and assigned readings on 

* Absent on leave. 



148 The College. 

selected topics outside of class. This course is also intended for students 
in engineering and medicine and those majoring in science, and may not 
be counted toward a major in German. Its aim is to develop the rapid 
reading of more advanced scientific German in special fields. It is planned 
as a continuation of course No. 3B, but is open to students who have had 
SA. Kruse. 

4C. — Elementary German Composition. Two hours credit. First 
semester, 11. Students planning to major in German are required 
to take this course with 4A. Spangler. 

5.— Schiller. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9. Students 
majoring in German should elect Intermediate German Composition, 
course 10, in connection with this course. Engel. 

6. — Iphigenie and Nathan der Weise. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 10. Engel. 

7. — Modern Narrative Prose. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
8. Selections from the best-known writers of the nineteenth and twen- 
tieth centuries. Prerequisite, German 4. Thurnau. 

8. — Modern Dramatic Prose. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10. Reading of representative plays of the best-known modern dra- 
matists. Open to students who have had German 4. Kruse. 

9. — Historical Prose. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 11. 
Introductory reading of Schonfeld's German Historical Prose, followed 
by more rapid and extensive reading in selected historical writings. The 
purpose of this course is to develop rapid and intelligent reading of Ger- 
man works and periodicals in history and sociology. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 4. (Not given in 1918-'19.) Kruse. 

10. — Intermediate German Composition. Two hours credit. First 
semester, 9; second semester, 10. Required of all students majoring in 
German. Spangler. 

11. — Advanced German Composition. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 8. This course is planned especially for those students who 
expect to teach German, but is open to all who have had course 10. The 
course aims to develop the ability to write correct and idiomatic German 
in translation and original compositions, with the mastery of a definite 
vocabulary. Engel. 

12. — German Oral Composition. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 8: second semester, at 11. The aim of this course is to aid students 
in acquiring and using a practical conversational vocabulary. Pre- 
requisite, course 4. Thurnau, Spangler. 

13. — Lessing's Laocoon and Dramaturgie. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 8. Selected portions of these works, with supplementary 
reading and discussion of the principles of art and the drama. (Not given 
in 1918-'19.) Thurnau, Corbin. 

50. — Goethe's Faust. (Parts I, and II.) Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11. Corbin. 

51. — German Literature. Three hours credit. First semester, at 10. 
A general survey of the history of German literature from the earliest 
times to the classical period. Lectures in connection with Thomas' 
History and Anthology. Thurnau. 

52. — History of German Prose Fiction. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 10. Lectures and selected readings. Special emphasis on 
the growth of realism in the nineteenth century. Thurnau. 

53. — The Lyrics of Goethe. Two hours credit. First semester, at 8. 
Study of the lyrics in connection with the life and letters of the author. 

Corbin. 

54. — The Realistic Drama. Three hours credit. First semester, at 8. 
A brief consideration of the development of the German drama, followed 



Hispanic Languages and Literatures. 149 

by a more intensive study of the dramas of Hebbel, Ludwig, and Anzen- 
gruber. Lectures, readings, and reports. Kruse. 

55. — The Naturalistic Drama. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 8. Hauptmann, Sudermann, and Halbe. Lectures, readings, and re- 
ports. Should be preceded by course 54. Kruse. 

56. — The Romantic Drama. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 8. Heinrich von Kleist, Grillparzer, and Wagner. Lectures, readings, 
and reports. This course alternates with course 55. Kruse. 

57. — Storm and Stress. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 8. 
Special study of the writings of Goethe and Schiller in this period, with 
lectures and library reading on the lesser writers and the literary move- 
ment as a whole. Engel. 

58. — Modern Swedish I. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. A study of the Swedish language. Elmquist's Swedish 
Grammar. Sturtevant. 

59. — Modern Swedish II. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Lectures on Swedish literature. Tegner's Frithiofssaga, 
and other works. Sturtevant. 

60. — Modern Norwegian I. Three hours credit. First semester, by 
appointment. A study of the Norwegian language. Groth's Dano- 
Norwegian Grammar; Holvik's Beginners' Book in Norse. Sturtevant. 

61. — Modern Norwegian II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Lectures on Norwegian literature. Ibsen's Samfun- 
dets Stotter and Peer Gynt. Sturtevant. 

HISPANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professor: Owen (Chairman of Department). 
Assistant Prof essor : Gardner.* 
Instructors: Osma, Adbalade.to, Husson. 
Assistayit Instructors : Brady, Huffman. 

General Statement. This department formed, until the summer of 
1918, a part of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. 
At that time a separation was effected and an independent department 
created. The term "Hispanic Languages" includes Spanish and Portu- 
guese. 

Equipment. The department possesses the usual pedagogical aids to 
linguistic study, such as wall maps, charts, lantern slides, and the like. 
Its library contains resources sufficient to enable students to pursue 
literary research and special investigation in the several fields included 
within its scope. The important scientific journals devoted to the sub- 
ject are received. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Students who wish to take only 
five hours of Spanish to satisfy a group requirement must take course 1 
if they have entered with no Spanish, course 2 if with one unit, courses 
3 and 4 if with two units, courses 5 and 6 if with three units. If they 
have entered with four units they may select five hours from courses 7, 8, 
9, 10, and 12. 

Courses 1 to 5, inclusive, must be taken in order, save that 3 and 4 
should be taken together. Students who major in Spanish will ordinarily 
be required to take courses 5, 6, 7, 53, 54, 55, 56, and 57; and, if they are 
subsequently to do graduate work, course 58. Major students are advised 
to take at least ten hours of French. Some knowledge of Latin is all but 
indispensable and a reading knowledge of German highly desirable. Out- 
side of the linguistic field, courses in modern European history and in 
English literature should be elected. 

* Absent on leave. 



150 The College. 

Students not majoring in the department, but wishing to be recom- 
mended for teaching positions in Spanish, must, in general, have taken 
courses 5 and 7 and one course numbered above 52. 

Students not majoring in the department who desire training in 
Spanish suitable for the commercial, consular, or diplomatic fields should 
take courses 6, 7, and 12. 

Major students should consult with the department during the second 
semester of their Sophomore year. 

SPANISH. 

1. — Elementary Spanish. Five hours credit. First semester, at 8:30, 
9:30, 10:30, 11:30 and 1:30; second semester, at 8:30, 9:30, 11:30 and 
1:30. The essentials of grammar (Fuentes and Francois, A Practical 
Spanish Grammar). Careful drill in pronunciation; elementary composi- 
tion and syntax; about 100 pages of easy reading; the beginning of Span- 
ish conversation. Gardner, Osma, Albaladejo, Husson, Brady. 

2. — Spanish Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 8:30, 9:30, 10:30 and 11:30; first semester, at 8:30, 10:30 and 
1:30. Reading and translation of easy modern prose (Perez Galdos, 
Carrion- Aza, Martinez de la Rosa, etc.) ; grammar, composition and prac- 
tice in speaking Spanish. Prerequisite, course 1 (or one year in high 
school.) Gardner, Osma, Albaladejo, Husson, Huffman. 

3. — Modern Prose Writers. Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 
8:30 and 10:30. Attention is devoted to the student's acquiring the ability 
to read ordinary Spanish 'prose with fluency and expression as well as to 
translate with accuracy. The material is chosen from the writings of 
modern novelists and dramatists, e. g., Alarcon, Palacio, Valdes, Blasco 
Ibahez, Maratin, Larra, etc. Prerequisite, course 2 (or two years in 
high school). Gardner, Albaladejo, Brady. 

4. — Spanish Composition. Two hours credit. Both semesters, at 8:30 
and 10:30. Systematic training in writing and speaking Spanish. Trans- 
lation into Spanish of material from such books as Cool's Spanish Com- 
position, together with short Spanish themes. Advanced grammar 
(Ramsey: A Text-book of Modern Spanish.) Must accompany or be pre- 
ceded by course 3. Osma, Albaladejo. 

5. — Spanish Prose and Poetry". Three hours credit. Both semesters, 
at 11:30. Specimens of the work of the poets, dramatists, essayists and 
novelists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, e. g., Becquer, Nunez 
de Arce, Mesonero Romanos, Pereda, Valera, Perez Galdos, Martinez 
Sierra, etc." Required of all Spanish majors. Prerequisites, courses 3 and 
4 (or three years in high school.) Owen. 

6. — Advanced Spanish Composition. Two hours credit. Both semes- 
ters, at 11:30. While there will be some translation into Spanish of 
standard English prose, more emphasis will be placed upon original Span- 
ish themes. Advanced grammar and syntax. (Ramsey: A Text-book of 
Modern Spanish.) Required of majors. Prerequisites, courses 3 and 4 
(or three years in high school). Osma, Albaladejo. 

7. — Spanish Conversation. Three hours credit. First semester 
(daily) at 1:30. This is a laboratory course in the spoken language, and 
is conducted wholly in Spanish. Required of majors. Prerequisite, 
course 5 or its equivalent. Osma, Albaladejo. 

8. — Introduction to Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. First 
semester, by appointment. Rapid reading of modern authors and of a 
limited number of seventeenth century classics. Prerequisite, course 5 
or its equivalent. Owen, Gardner. 

9. — Introductory Cervantes Course. Two hours credit. First semes- 
ter, by appointment. Reading of selections from the Quijote and the 
Novelets ejemplares (Ford's Selections from Don Quijote; Rennert's edi- 



History and Political Science. 151 

tion of the Novelets ejemplares), together with some consideration of 
Cervantes' life and times. Prerequisite, course 5 or its equivalent. 

Owen, Gardner. 

10. — Selected Dramas of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. Reading and interpretation 
of representative works of the more notable dramatists of the last 
century (Moratin the younger, Hartzenbusch, Lopez de Ayala, Echegaray, 
etc.), with some discussion of schools and tendencies. Prerequisite, 
course 5. Gardner, Osma. 

11. — Spanish Ballads and Lyrics. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, by appointment. The student will read and study the several 
types of the popular and of the artistic ballad as well as representative 
works of the most notable lyric poets, particularly of the last two 
centuries. (Morley's Spanish Ballads ; Hill's and Morley's Spanish Lyrics.) 
Prerequisite, course 8. (Given in alternate years. Not given in 1919-'20) • 

Gardner. 

12. — Commercial Spanish. Five hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. Translation of facsimile and original business corres- 
pondence; writing of business letters; drafts, invoices and other com- 
mercial forms and usages. Reports in Spanish on consular and govern- 
mental documents. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite, twenty hours 
of Spanish. (Given in alternate years. Not given in 1919-'20.) 

Albaladejo. 

13. — Spanish Rhetoric and Versification. Three hours credit. First 
semester, by appointment. Rhetorical theory and practice; frequent 
themes in Spanish; the fundamentals of Spanish versification. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. Prerequisite, twenty hours of Spanish. (Given in 
alternate years. Not given in 1919-'20.) Albaladejo. 

51. — Elementary Spanish for Upperclassmen. Five hours credit. 
First semester, at 10:30. For Juniors and Seniors who are beginning 
Spanish. More comprehensive in scope and more intensive in method 
than course 1 (q. v.). Owen, Gardner. 

52. — Spanish Reading and Grammar for Upperclassmen. Five 
hours credit. Second semester, at 10:30. A continuation of course 51. 

Owen, Gardner. 

53. — History of Modern Spanish Literature Three hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. From 1790 to the end of the Nineteenth 
century. The influence of French neo-classicism and of the English and 
French romanticists. The rise of realism. Prerequisite, course 5. 

Owen. 

54. — The Classic Spanish Drama. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Moreto, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, Calderon 
and Ruiz de Alarcon. Careful study of selected, plays from each dram- 
atist; more rapid reading of others. Prerequisite, course 5. 

Gardner, Osma. 

55. — Contemporary Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. A study of the literary renaissance in 
Spain since the Spanish-American war: the "Generation of 1898"; novel, 
drama, and criticism. Lectures, collateral reading, and reports. Pre- 
requisite, course 53. Owen. 

56. — The Spanish Novel of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Cen- 
turies. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. The 
Npvelas ejemplares of Cervantes, Lazarillo de Tormes, and other picar- 
esque novels. Menendez y Pelayo: Origenes de la novela. 

Gardner, Albaladejo. 

57. — Don Quijote. Three hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. Linguistic and literary study of the text of the great novel. 
Lectures, collateral readings and reports dealing with Cervantes' life 
and period. Prerequisite, twenty hours. Owen. 



152 The College. 

58. — History of Early Spanish Literature. Three hours credit 
Second semester, by appointment. From the earliest monuments to the 
Golden Age. Ford's Old Spanish Readings: Juan Ruiz, Libra de buen 
amor, etc. Lectures, reports, and term paper. Prerequisite, courses 53 
and 56. 0wen> 

PORTUGUESE. 

70.— Elementary Portuguese Three hours credit. First semester, 
by appointment. Branner's grammar and about 100 pages of easy read- 
ing. Open to Juniors and Seniors who have had ten hours of Spanish. 

Osma. 
71.— Portuguese Reading, Speaking, and Writing. Three hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. A continuation of course 70. 

Osma. 
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Professors: Hodder (Head of Department), Patterson, 

Dykstra.* 
Associate Professors : Crawford, Davis,* Moore.* 
Assistant Professors : Mei/vtn, Derr,! Chubb. 

Equipment. The University library is supplied with all the im- 
portant secondary authorities and with the source material suitable for 
undergraduate use. The latter includes the compilation of French, 
British, and American statutes, and complete sets of the Archive Par- 
lementaire, Hansard's Debates, and the successive congressional series. 
The periodical collections are slight but fairly comprehensive, including 
the Moniteur (not yet complete) , the Annual Register, Gentleman's Maga- 
zine, DeBow's Review, and a file of the National Intelligencer. The 
supply of wall maps for class room use is exceptionally large. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. The plan of the department is to 
furnish general courses for long historical periods, a series of intensive 
courses for shorter periods, and a limited number of courses in special 
fields. The courses in mediaeval and English history serve as an intro- 
duction to all the work of the department. The general courses in mod- 
ern European and American history are suited to the needs of students 
who do not intend to specialize in history, and the general course in one 
of the two fields may be taken to advantage by those intending to spe- 
cialize in the other. A reading knowledge of French and German is ad- 
vantageous to upper-class students of history and indispensable to grad- 
uates. Students intending to take a major in this field should, early 
in their course, consult the instructors in the department in regard 
to the best arrangement of their work. 

Recommendation of Teachers. Students desiring the recommenda- 
tion of the department as teachers in high schools, must in addition 
to completing a major in the department, cover, in a manner sat- 
isfactory to the department, the field of history and civics that is taught 
in the high schools of the state. Such students should as early as practi- 
cable in their course seek the advice of the department as to the work that 
will be required of them and the best order in which it may be taken. 

HISTORY. 

1. — Mediaeval History I. Three hours credit. First semester, M. 
W., at 8:30, and third hour by appointment. A history of Europe from 
the barbarian invasions to the crusades. A fundamental course intro- 
ductory to all the work in European history. Lectures, quizzes, col- 
lateral reading, and reports. Patterson. 

2. — Mediaeval History II. Three hours credit. Second semester, M. 
W., at 8:30, and a third hour by appointment. Covers the history of 

* Absent on leave, t Acting, 1918-'19. 



History and Political Science. 153 

Europe from the crusades to the beginning of the sixteenth century. 
Lectures, quizzes, collateral reading, and reports. Continues and should 
be preceded by mediaeval history I. Patterson. 

3. — English History. Five hours credit. First semester, at 9:30 and 
10:30; second semester, at 9:30 and 10:30. Traces the development of 
England, Scotland, and Ireland with emphasis upon the growth of 
economic, social, and political institutions. Recitations and occasional 
lectures. Not open to students who have entrance credit for English 
history. Crawford. 

5. — American History. Five hours credit. Both semesters, at 8:30. 
A general survey of American history from the discovery to the present 
time. Same as courses 7 and 8. Not open to students who have en- 
trance credit in American history. Davis. 

6 a and b. — American History I. Three or two hours credit. First 
semester, a, three hours, at 9:30, and b, two hours at 9:30. Same as the 
first part of course 5, coming down to 1820 in the three-hour course and 
to 1789 in the two-hour course. Not open to students who have en- 
trance credit for American history. Davis. 

7 a and b. — American History II. Three or two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, a, three hours, at 9:30, and b, two hours, at 9:30. Same 
as the last part of course 5. Preferably preceded by courses 6 a or b. 
7 a continues 6 b from 1789 and 7 b continues 6 a from 1820. Not open 
to students who have entrance credit for American history. Davis. 

50. — Greek History. Two hours credit. First semester, at 10:30. 
The course will trace the political and intellectual development of the 
Greeks and emphasize social and economic changes. Lectures, quizzes, 
and collateral reading. (Given in 1918-'19 by Department of Ancient 
Languages.) Brandt. 

51. — Roman History. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10:30. 
A general survey, in which the period of the late republic and early em- 
ceded by Greek history. (Given in 1918-'19 by Department of Ancient 
Languages.) Brandt. 

52. — Medieval Institutions. Two hours credit. First semester at 
9:30. Growth of political and ecclesiastical institutions during the feudal 
period, and a detailed analysis of the organization of society in the 
twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Must be preceded by courses 1 and 2. 

Patterson. 

53. — Mediaeval Culture. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
9:30. A survey of the intellectual development of Europe from Augus- 
tine to Dante, including such subjects as mediaeval literature, scholasti- 
cism; the universities, architecture, and the rise of the vernacular lan- 
guages. Must be preceded by courses 1 and 2. Patterson. 

54. — Italian Renaissance. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
9:30. A survey of the political, social, economic, intellectual, and artistic 
development of the Italian people from the fourteenth to the sixteenth 
centuries. Must be preceded by courses 1 and 2. (Not given in 1919-'20.) 

Patterson. 

55. — Protestant Revolt. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 
9:30. After a review of the social, economic, and intellectual anteced- 
ents of the movement in Germany, the career of Luther and the progress 
of the revolt to the Peace of Augsburg will be traced. Must be pre- 
ceded by courses 1 and 2. (Not given in 1919-'20.) Patterson. 

56.— English Institutions I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
8:30. Treats of the Anglo-Saxon government, the foundations of par- 
liament, the central and local government, the judiciary, feudalism, the 
manorial system, and gilds. Lectures, reports, and collateral reading. 
(Not given in 1919-'20.) Crawford. 



154 The College. 

57.— English Institutions II. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 8:30. Treats of the Tudor absolutism, the Reformation, the struggle 
between the crown and parliament, with special emphasis upon the nine- 
teenth century. Continues and must be preceded by English Institu- 
tions. I. (Not given in 1919-'20.) Crawford. 

58. — History of the Common Law I. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 8:30. Treats of the fundamental principles of Anglo-Saxon 
law and procedure, the transition to common law, the growth of the ju- 
diciary, and the general principles of status and of real property. Pri- 
marily designed for students preparing for law, journalism, and busi- 
ness. Crawford. 

59. — History of the Common Law II. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 8:30. Treats of the general principles of personal prop- 
erty, contracts, torts, crimes, and civil and criminal procedure. Con- 
tinues and must be preceded by History of Common Law I. Crawford. 

60. — Foundations of Modern Europe. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 1:30. A survey of the political and social development of 
Europe from 1500 to 1815. Should precede all other courses in modern 
European history. Largely recitations. Melvin. 

61.— History of Contemporary Europe. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 1:30. Covers the history of Europe from 1815 to 1914, with 
special reference to the causes of the Great War. Continues the pre- 
ceding course and should be preceded by it. Melvin. 

62. — French Revolution. Three hours credit. First semester, at 
2:30. The origins and development of the revolutionary movement in 
France and its effect upon Europe. Should be preceded by course 60 or 
an equivalent. Melvin. 

63. — Napoleon. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 2:30. The 
career and age of Napoleon with special reference to the revolutionary 
reconstruction of France and of Europe. Continues and should be pre- 
ceded by the preceding course. Melvin. 

64. — The War and the Peace. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11:30. A systematic review of the course of recent world politics and 
of the causes of and the diplomatic problems involved in the Great War. 

Davis. 

65. — Problems of Modern European History I. Two hours credit. 
First semester, at 2:30. Studies in special fields of modern European 
history, designed to give intensive study of certain topics covered in the 
general courses and preliminary training in historical research. The 
topics will vary with the needs of the students taking the course. Must 
be preceded by the general course covering the field of research. 

Melvin. 

66.- — Problems of Modern European History II. Two hours credit. 
Second semester, at 2:30. This course is the same in character as the pre- 
ceding, and either continues the work of the preceding course or takes up 
new topics for students not having taken the preceding course. 

Melvin. 

67. — American Colonial History. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, at 2:30. This course covers the discovery of America, the period of 
Spanish and French exploration, and the origin and development of the 
English colonies. Hodder. 

68. — American Revolution and the Constitution. Three hours 
credit. Second semester, at 2:30. A study of the causes and results of 
the American Revolution and of the formation of the constitution. A con- 
tinuation of course 67, but not necessarily preceded by it. Hodder. 

69. — American Constitutional Law. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 2:30. A study of the judicial construction of the constitution 



History and Political Science. 155 

of the United States from the political rather than from the legal stand- 
point. Recitations. Hodder. 

70. — Presidential Administrations I. Five hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 3:30. The political and constitutional history of the United 
States from 1789 to 1840. A topical treatment of the most important 
phases of American history- Should be preceded by course 69. 

Hodder. 

71. — Presidential Administrations II. Five hours credit. Second 
semester, at 3:30. The political and constitutional history of the United 
States from 1840 to 1900. The causes and results of the Civil War. Con- 
tinuation of course 70, but not necessarily preceded by it. Hodder. 

72. — Latin America. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 11:30. 
The origin of the Spanish, Portuguese, and French colonies in America; 
the modification in Latin America of European institutions and culture; 
the struggle for independence and the succeeding national development 
and international relations of the Latin American states. Davis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

10. — American Government.* Five hours credit. First and second 
semesters, at 8:30, 9:30 and 10:30. A systematic study of the develop- 
ment and structure of American government, national and state, with 
emphasis upon actual workings. Derry, Chubb. 

81. — Municipal Government. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9:30. A study cf the government of the American city, its develop- 
ment and structure, its relation to the state, the various types of organiza- 
tion, and the participation of the people in city affairs. Comparisons be- 
tween American and European cities in form and function are drawn 
in an attempt to assess American municipal progress. Prerequisite, 
course 10, or an equivalent. Derry. 

82. — Municipal Administration. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, at 11:30. The functions and administration of the city, particularly 
the American city. Such topics as the following will be discussed: 
Streets and city planning, the utility problems of light, water, lighting 
and transportation, fire protection, municipal finance, and school and 
police administration. Prerequisite, course 81. Dykstra. 

83. — American State Government. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 11:30. The original principles of state government in the 
United States, the development of state constitutions, the problems of 
modern state government, and an analysis of the various projects for 
reorganization and reform. Prerequisite, course 10, or an equivalent. 

Chubb. 

84. — European Government. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11:30. An examination of the constitutions and political systems of the 
leading European states, with emphasis upon recent changes made by 
the war. Prerequisite, course 10 or an equivalent. Chubb. 

85. — The Judiciary. Two hours credit. Second semester. A study 
of the organization and jurisdiction of the judiciary. Special attention 
will be given to the development of the courts, their power to declare 
statutes unconstitutional, their importance in the American govern- 
ment, and their influence in the field of social and economic legislation. 
Prerequisite, course 10 or an equivalent. Moore. 

86. — Political Parties. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11:30. 
The place of the party system in democratic government; the organiza- 
tion and development of party machinery; party abuses and the attempt 
to subject parties to popular control. Prerequisite, course 10 or an 
equivalent. « Chubb. 

87. — International Law. Three hours credit. First semester, at 
9:30. A statement of the principles of international public law, including 



156 The College. 

the Hague conventions; also a study of the settlement of international 
disputes by organized peaceful means. A liberal use of cases and official 
documents is made. Prerequisite, course 10 or an equivalent. Chubb. 

88. — Elementary Law. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
10:30. A study of the fundamental principles of the common law, de- 
signed to give familiarity with common legal terms and court procedure, 
and emphasizing such subjects as torts, contracts, real and personal prop- 
erty. Prerequisite, course 10 or an equivalent. Moore. 

89. — Principles of Political Science. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 9:30. The fundamental principles of political science and the 
part they have played in the practice of the modern state, together 
with a critical examination of the theories of sovereignty, nationalism, 
the nature of the state and state purpose. An attempt is made in this 
course to find a reasonable basis for the existing state organization and 
its activities. Prerequisite, five hours of political science. Derry. 

90. — History of Political Theories. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, by appointment. A brief review of ancient and mediaeval political 
philosophy, followed by a study of modern English and continental politi- 
cal theories. A short time is given to the consideration of typical Amer- 
ican theory. Prerequisite, eight hours of political science. Seniors may 
enroll by permission of the instructor. Dykstra. 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

Professor: Sprague (Head of Department). 

Instructors: Allen, Woodruff,* Meguiar, Jones, Stevenson. 

Equipment. The department occupies nine rooms in Frazer Hall. 
These include two food laboratories, a chemical laboratory, a research 
laboratory, a textile and sewing room, and two lecture rooms with an 
experimental and demonstration kitchen in connection with one of them. 
The laboratories are equipped both for general class work and for 
research. The library contains the standard books on the subject. 

Advice to Students. The courses of instruction given in this depart- 
ment are planned to meet the needs of three classes of students: (a) 
those who desire a knowledge of the general principles and facts of home 
economics; (b) those who wish to major in home economics for the pur- 
pose of teaching the subject in secondary schools and colleges; (c) those 
who are interested in preparing to become dietitians, or to follow other 
professions. 

Students who belong to groups (b) and (c) are advised to begin their 
work in the department as early as possible in order to secure a proper 
sequence of the elementary and advanced subjects; to have a desirable 
distribution of courses; to become thoroughly familiar with the subject 
matter before undertaking the course in the teaching of home economics 
and practice teaching; and, in the case of those who wish to do more ad- 
vanced work, to provide for the necessary training in the fundamental 
sciences. Such students should consult the head of the department be- 
fore arranging their courses. 

Advice as to Courses. Courses of a general nature which are sug- 
gested for students who are not majoring in the department, but who 
wish some training in the subject pertaining to the home, are as follows: 
(1) Home Architecture, (2) Home Decoration, (65) Public Aspects of 
the Household, (71) Textiles, (72a) Clothing Design, (6) Food Con- 
servation. 

Major Requirements. Students may satisfy part of the requirment 
for the major in the department by the election of any of the following 
allied subjects in other departments: (53) Bacteriology of Foods, (60) 
Chemistry of Food Products, (52D) Food Analysis, (64) Heredity in 
Relation to Eugenics. f _ 

* Absent on leave. 



Home Economics. 



157 



In general, the major in the department is as follows: 
Major in Home Economics. 



PREREQUISITE. 



Chemistry 1 

Selection and preparation of 
food 



Selection and preparation 

of foods 

Home architecture, etc... 

Economics 1 

Sociology 



(Freshman-Sophomore.) 

PRESCRIBED. Hrs. 

1. Home architecture and 
sanitation 2 

3. Selection and prepara- 

tion of food 5 

4. Economic uses of 

food* 5 



SUGGESTED. 



Hrs. 



( Junior-Senior. ) 

71. Textiles 3 



0. Sewing 

2. Home decoration I. . . 2 



51. Dietetics 5 

72. a Clothing (design) .. 3 
b Clothing (mfg.) ... 2 



80. Home administration, 3 65. Public aspects of the 

household 3 



Economic uses of food. 
Organic chemistry 

Bacteriology, or , 

Botany 4, or , 

Dietetics 



52. Special problems 
home economcif 



81. Home decorations II. . 3 
3-5 53. Special problems in 

home economics . . 3-5 



0. — Plain Sewing and Garment Making. No credit. First semester, 
Tu. Th., 1 to 4. Principles and practice in hand and machine sewing, 
drafting, and making of simple garments. This course is offered be- 
cause the majority of students have not had the opportunity of taking 
it in the high school. It is prerequisite to course 726. Fee, $1. Allen. 

1. — Home Architecture and Sanitation. Two hours credit. Both 
semesters, 9 and 1. A study of the evolution of tliQ house; the develop- 
ment of its functions as a place of shelter, defense, and the center of 
family life; types of domestic architecture; the planning and care of 
the house with regard to the comfort, convenience, and health of the 
family. Meguiar. 

2. — Home Decoration. Two hours credit. Both semesters, 11 and 
2. The theory of color and decoration and its application in home 
decoration; materials suitable for various purposes in the home; fur- 
nishings from an economic, sanitary, and artistic standpoint. Meguiar. 

3. — Selection and Preparation of Food. Five hours credit. Both 
semesters, M. W. P., 8 to 10, and Tu. Th,, 9; M. W. F., 10 to 12, 
and Tu. Th., 10. An experimental study of the different classes of 
nutrients, with the application of this knowledge in the selection and 
preparation of foods. Prerequisite, chemistry 1. Advised, physiology 1. 
Fee, $5. Sprague, Allen, Jones. 

4. — Economic Uses of Food.* Five hours credit. Both semesters, 
M. W. 1 to 2; Tu. Th., 1 to 4. The principles of food preservation, 
marketing and domestic storage; the planning of meals to prevent 
waste, give variety, and regulate cost according to food values. Pre- 
requisite, course 3. Fee, $4. Jones. 

6a. — Food and Nutrition. Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 10. 
The purpose of this course is to present in a nontechnical way the more 
elementary problems of food and nutrition with reference to the food 
requirements of man and the considerations which should underlie our 
judgment of the nutritive value of food. Designed for the general stu- 
dent. Jones. 

6b. — Food and Nutrition. (Laboratory work.) Two hours credit. 
Both semesters, Tu. Th., 10 to 12. To be taken only as a parallel course 
with 6a. This course is designed to give a practical application of the 
principles embodied in 6a. Jones. 



158 The College. 

«. 10 :-r HoME NV RS ? NG - 8 hours credit - Home hygiene; home care ot 
the sick; prophylaxis; symptoms of disease; first aid and emergencies- 
maternity nursing; infant care and feeding. No prerequisites. Lecture 
and demonstrations daily; practice as arranged. Sherbon. 

51. — Dietetics. Five hours credit. Second semester, M. W. F. 10- 
and Tu Th., 10 to 12. The principles of diet; the relation of food 
to health; food habits and dietary standards; the dietetic treatment of 
diseases; experimental study of special problems in nutrition. Pre- 
requisites, economic uses of food, organic chemistry, physiology 1. Physio- 
logical chemistry advised. Fee, $2.50. 

52. — Special Problems in Home Economics I. Three or five hours 
credit. First semester. A critical study of common theories and practice 
in food preparation and other home activities, with experimental investi- 
gation of special problems. Prerequisites, economic uses of food, elemen- 
tary organic chemistry; bacteriology, or botany, or dietetics. Qualitative 
and quantitative chemistry advised. Fee, $3 or $5. Sprague. 

53. — Special Problems in Home Economics II. Three or five hours 
credit. Second semester. The work of each student will be under the 
direction of the member of the staff in charge of the subject chosen. A 
continuation of course 52. Fee, $3 to $5. 

65. — Public Aspects of the Household. Three hours credit. Both 
semesters, 9. This course is designed to give the student a view of the 
broader aspects of home economics as it is related to the welfare of the 
community. Special emphasis will be laid upon the state and federal 
laws which are most directly connected with the home. Designed es- 
pecially for the general student. Sprague. 

71. — Textiles. Three hours credit. Second semester, M. W., 1 to 3. 
F., 1. A study of the production and manufacture of textiles from the 
standpoint of the consumer; the properties and uses of the different 
textile fibers and fabrics; tests for adulteration; principles of cleaning 
fabrics. Prerequisite, chemistry 1. Fee, $2. Allen. 

72a. — Clothing Design. Three hours credit. First semester, 9. A 
study of the history of costume with emphasis upon the factors in- 
fluencing its design; the psychology of fashion; the hygiene of dress. 
Prerequisite, Design I. Allen. 

726. — Clothing Manufacture. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
Tu. Th., 1 to 4. Laboratory practice in carrying out designs; economic 
problems of the construction of clothing at home; economic and sociologi- 
cal phases of the clothing industry. Prerequisites, course or equiva- 
lent, and 72a. Fee, $2. Allen. 

80. — Home Administration. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
10. A study of the home as a social unit and a classification of its 
problems; a brief history of the changes that have come in the work of 
women in the home; the economic and sociological value of home-making; 
the organization of the household, division of the income, general prin- 
ciples of buying. Prerequisites, economic uses of foods, or textiles; home 
architecture and sanitation, sociology 1, economics 1, or 90. Advised, 
zoology 60 and 64. Sprague. 

806 — Home Administration. Two hours credit. Second semester. 
Laboratory work in a practice house to provide actual experience in 
household management, including practice in household operations, budget- 
ing and accounting and administration of group relations under as 
near as possible the normal living conditions of the home and of the 
community. Required for those who wish to qualify as teachers of 

home-making in high schools receiving Smith-Hughes aid. . 

81. — Home Decoration II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
8 to 10. A continuation of home decoration I, emphasizing the gen- 



Journalism. • 159 

eral principles of design in their application in the home. A study 
of selected problems in practical household designing. Prerequisite, 
design I. Meguiar. 

82. — Home Nursing. Three hours credit. Second semester. A special 
course designed to qualify teachers of home-making courses in high 
schools receiving Smith-Hughes aid. Lectures, demonstrations,, and 
practice work. Sherbon. 

JOURNALISM. ' 

Professor: Flint (Chairman of Department). 
Assistant Professor: Rick. 
Instructors: Dill, Brown, Lewis. 

Men and women intending to enter newspaper work as a profession or 
as a stepping stone to higher literary endeavor are here given the oppor- 
tunity for specialized training accorded other professions. The depart- 
ment offers technical courses in the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years, 
makes suggestions as to preparatory courses in the Freshman year, and 
recommends supplementary courses to be pursued in the four years. 

Students intending to do their major work in this field, and particu- 
larly those planning to do graduate work in Journalism, should consult 
the faculty of the department as early as possible. 

Those interested in the study of the newspaper as an organ of de- 
mocracy or in its historical or ethical aspects will find in the department 
several courses general in their scope. 

Practical Work. The University Daily Kansan, published by students 
of the Department of Journalism, affords every opportunity to put the 
theory of the classroom into practice. From reporter to editor-in-chief, 
the student learns at first hand the organization of the newspaper office, 
becomes familiar with the mechanical, economic and ethical problems, and 
acquires speed and accuracy in reportorial work and editorial supervision. 
Instruction in business management, particularity the science of cost 
finding, is emphasized. 

Equipment. The laboratory of the department has all the facilities 
that go to make up a modern "back office." It is equipped with type- 
setting machines — linotypes and a monotype — a complete composing room, 
a book and newspaper press, and job presses. 

Reporter's desks in the "front office" are equipped with typewriters, in 
the use of which training is given. 

The library of the department, containing a wide assortment of books 
on all phases of journalism, is in rooms convenient to the news room and 
offices. Thirty-six metropolitan dailies, representing the great news- 
paper personalities of the world, are received, together with the leading 
national weeklies and magazines. Five hundred Kansas papers also reach 
the laboratory regularly. 

Fees. Each student enrolled in the department pays a fee of fifty 
cents to cover, in part, the cost of newspapers and magazines used in the 
daily work. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 

1. — The Newspaper I.* Three hours credit. Both semesters. First 
semester, at 8 and 11; second semester, at 10. Materials and methods. 
The news story. The human-interest story. The feature. The editorial. 
Gathering and writing campus news. Correspondence for metropolitan 
papers. The fundamental principles of accuracy and style. Prerequi- 
sites, rhetoric 1 and 2. Rice, Dill, Lewis. 

2. — The Newspaper II.* Three hours credit. First semester, at 10; 
second semester, at 8 and 11. Organization of the office; function of de- 
partmental heads; subeditors — financial, sporting, society, and others; 
copy readers; reporters; press associations; women in newspaper work; 



160 The College. 

types of news stories. Practical work daily in reporting. Lectures and 
practice in newspaper photography. Prerequisite, course 1. Rice, Dill 

3.— Comparative Journalism.* Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 10. A general course for those interested in the newspaper whether or 
not intending to prepare for the profession of journalism. Intensive 
study of great newspaper personalities of all types in American journal- 
ism, with lectures on journalism in England, France, Germany, and the 
Orient. Dill. 

4. — History of American Journalism.* Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 10. A rapid survey of English journalism from its be- 
ginning, followed by a comprehensive study of American journalism from 
the early beginnings in Massachusetts, through succeeding periods, to 
the present. Special studies of the careers of great American editors. 

Dill. 

51. — Magazine Writing. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11. 
Intensive study of major types of magazine special articles: nature, and 
sources of material; variety in treatment. Coordinated practice work 
judged on its publication possibility. Brief survey of the growth of 
magazines in England and America. Class discussions and personal 
conferences on manuscript. Courses 1 and 2 recommended, but not re- 
quired, as prerequisites. Flint. 

52. — The Short Story.\ Three hours credit. Second semester, at 11. 
Comprises (1) reading of selected short stories for analytical and com- 
parative purposes to illustrate principles governing construction of short 
stories, (2) attention to guiding lectures, (3) creative writing, and (4) 
participation in class critical discussions and personal conferences on 
manuscript. Production judged by availability for publication. Lewis. 

53. — Interpretation of the /News I. Two hours credit. First semes- 
ter, at 10. Study of the history and technique of the editorial. Writing 
the shorter editorial. Working out appropriate forms in close study of 
contemporary editorials. Class lectures, discussions, and personal con- 
ferences to criticise manuscript. Courses 1 and 2 recommended as pre- 
requisites. Flint. 

54. — Interpretation of the News II, Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 10. Writing the longer editorial from mature determination 
of significance and relationship of facts in state, national, and inter- 
national news. Thorough training in lucid, logical, adequate, concise 
expression of opinion in vigorous, moving English style. Lectures and 
personal conferences. Courses 1 and 2 and 53 recommended as pre- 
requisites. Flint. 

55. — Elements of Advertising. Three hours credit. First semester 
at 10. A survey, descriptive and historical, of the whole field of adver- 
tising. A study of the functions of advertising and of its organization 
as a business. Designed for students interested in any line of business 
as well as for those intending to continue the study of advertising itself. 
Course 1 recommended as a prerequisite. Flint. 

56. — Advertising Copy, Three hours credit. Second semester at 10. 
A study of the application of principles of psychology to the writing of 
advertisements. Typography and display of advertising matter. Prac- 
tice in writing copy and preparing layouts, and also, for members of the 
class who wish it, experience in advertising salesmanship. Course 1 and 
courses in the department of psychology recommended as prerequisites. 
Need not be preceded by course 55. Flint. 

57. Advertising Camfaigns. Three hours credit. First semester at 

11. Solution of practical advertising problems and planning of cam- 
paigns. Study of mediums for reaching the public. Special forms of 
publicity. Printing methods. Illustrating. Retail, mail order, mu- 
nicipal, church, and idea advertising. Experience in salesmanship for 



Journalism. 161 

members of the class who desire it. Prerequisite, course 56. Courses 
1 and 2 recommended. Flint. 

58. — Newspaper Administration I. Two hours credit. First semes- 
ter at 9. A study ci the business side of newspaper publishing, designed 
to familiarize the student with the equipment of a newspaper plant, the 
expenses of publishing a paper, its sources of income, the handling of 
circulation and advertising, and the operation of a job-printing establish- 
ment. Course 1 recommended as a prerequisite. Flint. 

59. — Newspaper Administration II. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 9. A course in efficiency methods. Intensive study of methods 
for finding printing costs. How to conduct a printing business efficiently. 
Estimating. The terminology of printing. Judging paper stock. Course 

I recommended as a prerequisite. Need not be preceded by course 57. 

Flint. 

60. — Editorial Problems and Policies I. Three hours credit. First 
semester at 9. Ethics of journalism. Problems of the editor; his relation 
to the public. The managing editor : outlining newspaper campaigns. The 
news editor: his editorial capacity in display, quantity and position of 
news, and kindred problems. Prerequisite, course 1. Recommended to 
follow ten hours of journalism. Flint. 

61. — Editorial Problems and Policies II. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, at 9. Consideration of typical problems growing out of the 
relations between the newspaper and its readers, its advertisers, its com- 
munity, and the public in general. Sources of the newspaper's influence. 
Fields for dynamic journalism. Prerequisite, course 1. Need not be pre- 
ceded by course 59, but recommended to follow ten hours of journalism. 

Flint. 

62. — Editorial Practice I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11 
and 3. Practical application of the editor's work in supervising and in 
handling, collecting, preparing and editing copy for dailies, weeklies, and 
class publications. Actual copy-reading of local news, Associated Press 
and United Press full reports and special stories. The principles of make- 
up, with particular stress on headline writing. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Rice. 

63. — Editorial Practice II. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 

II and 3. Continuation of 61, with a comprehensive review of libel, postal 
regulations, copyright. The student is required to cover the field of libel 
in law, text and case books, and is given practice in eliminating libelous 
assertions from copy. A comparison of the styles of different papers as 
affecting the copyreader, particularly as to make-up. Prerequisites, 
courses 1 and 61. Rice. 

65. — The Mechanics of Printing. No credit. Both semesters. Two 
lectures and eight hours laboratory weekly. Students are taught to set 
type, make up and lock up forms, etc. This class will work on the 
mechanical end of the University publications. Brown. 

66. — The Art of Printing. No credit. Both semesters. Two lectures 
and five hours laboratory. Lectures on history and development of print- 
ing with practical work in designing advertisements, title pages, etc., 
and study of color schemes. Brown. 

Note. — Courses 65 and 66 are designed, first, to give the student a working knowl- 
edge of the mechanical department of a newspaper, that he may be better fitted for edi- 
torial supervision; second, to better equip those students who plan to own country papers; 
third, to reinforce rhetorical principles of mass, proportion, accuracy, emphasis, contrast, 
harmony, unity, and variety, by practical work with type faces. 

67. — Advanced News Writing I. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 8. Survey of news types, estimation of news values, the utilization of 
ways and means of exploring, assembling, and handling. Class analysis 

11— K. U.— 5419. 



162 The College. 

of best specimens, assigned "rewrite" synthesis illustrative of the ascer- 
tained common procedures. Lectures and class discussions. Prerequisites, 
courses 1 and 2. Lewis. 

68. — Advanced News Writing II. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 8. Special assignments for mature practice, especially in getting 
and constructing campus feature stories; the University publicity stories 
of wider scope; town, city, and state popular-movement, business, in- 
dustry, farming, commercial-scientific, and individual-personal newspaper 
special section stories. Class exchange and criticism; effort to place suc- 
cessful copy. Prerequisites, courses 1 and 2. Need not be preceded by 
course 67. Lewis. 

Note. — A special section of this course is offered at 11 for Seniors intending to teach 
in secondary schools. No prerequisites, A course giving general knowledge of the field 
of journalism, fundamental methods for teaching newspaper writing in high schools, and 
practical information for operating a high-school paper. 

LAW. 

The following courses in the School of Law are open to College Seniors 
who do not elect courses from other professional schools, but not more 
than fifteen hours may be counted towards the degree of bachelor of arts. 
Students desiring admission to any of these courses must register in the 
School of Law as well as in the College, and will be admitted to the 
classes as first-year law students. 

51. — Elementary Law. Two and one-half hours credit. First half of 
first semester. 

52. — Criminal Law. Two and one-half hours credit. First half of 
first semester. 

53. — Agency. Two and one-half hours credit. Second half of first 
semester. 

54. — Contracts. Five hours credit. First semester. 

55. — Bailments. Two and one-half hours credit. First half of second 
semester. 

56. — Torts. One hour credit. Second half of first semester; also, one 
and one-half hours, first half of second semester. 

57. — Sales. Two and one-half hours credit. First half of second se- 
mester. 

58. — Damages. Two and one-half hours credit. Second half of second 
semester. 

59. — Domestic Relations. Two and one-half hours credit. Second 
half of second semester. 

60. — Bills and Notes. Five hours credit. Second semester. 

61. — Suretyship. Two and one-half hours credit. Second half or 
second semester. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Professors: Van deb Vries,* Ashton (Chairman of De- 
partment). 
Associate Professors: Mitchell, Stouffer. 
Assistant Professors: Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 
Instructors : Marm, Black, Nelson. 

Equipment. The department of mathematics has a good collection of 
models in wood, plaster of paris, and strings illustrating various theorems 
of geometry and analysis. The library contains about 2,000 volumes re- 
lating to mathematics. The department also has in its possession a large 
collection of elementary textbooks, which is of especial value to prospec- 
tive teachers, affording, an excellent opportunity for comparing various 
methods of presentation. 

* ALsent on leave. 



Mathematics. 163 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. The courses in the department are 
arranged to meet the needs of four classes of students, as follows: (1) 
those who wish to study mathematics for general culture; (2) those who 
wish to take mathematics in preparation for advanced work in other de- 
partments; (3) those who wish to become teachers of mathematics in 
secondary schools; (4) those who wish to specialize with a view to finding 
a career in teaching and research in mathematics. The courses are ar- 
ranged in three groups ; the elementary group, open to all undergradu- 
ates; a more advanced group, open to Juniors, Seniors, and graduate 
students; and the graduate courses, open only to graduate students. 
(For a list of the latter courses see the announcements of the Graduate 
School.) 

(1) For general culture all or a part of courses 1 to 11 in proper se- 
quence are recommended; they may be taken two at a time (i. e., 2 and 
3, 4 and 5, etc.) 

(2) Students whose major work is in another department where 
mathematics is needed should consult with the chairman of the depart- 
ment in question regarding the mathematical courses they should elect. 

Students in groups (3) and (4) will naturally major in the depart- 
ment. 

Major Work. Under the general laws of the College, students major- 
ing in this department must complete at least 30 hours of mathematics, of 
which at least 12 hours must be chosen from courses numbered 50 and 
above. Courses 2 to 7 are required of all students majoring in the de- 
partment. 

(3) Those wishing to qualify for teachers of mathematics in high 
schools must include in their major 11 and 62. They are also advised to 
take some courses in physics and astronomy. 

(4) Students desiring to specialize in mathematics should take as 
many of the remaining courses offered as possible. Such students are 
advised to gain a reading knowledge of French and German as early in 
their courses as possible. Italian will also be a great help. 

1. Solid Geometry. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10, 11. 
The usual theorems and constructions of standard textbooks and applica- 
tions to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. Open to all students who 
do not offer solid geometry for entrance. Jordan, Wheeler. 

2a. — College Algebra. Three hours credit. First semester, 8, 10, 11, 
1, 2; second semester, 8, 9, 10, 11, 1. Rapid review of elementary al- 
gebra; graphic representation; logarithms; determinants; theory of 
equations; Horner's method of approximation. Stouffer, Marm, Black. 

26. — College Algebra. Two hours credit. First semester, 9, 10; 
second semester, 8, 1. This differs from 2a only in giving less time to the 
theory of logarithms and the theory of equations. Mitchell, Black. 

2c. — College Algebra. Five hours credit. Both semesters at 8. 
This section is intended for students who have entered with only one unit 
of algebra. It includes a thorough review of elementary algebra and as 
many of the subjects of 2a as possible. It may also be taken by students 
offering one and a half units of elementary algebra, but for such students 
it will give only three hours credit. Marm. 

3a. — Plane Trigonometry. Two hours credit. First semester, 8, 
10, 11, 1, 2; second semester, 8, 9, 10, 11. The six trigonometric func- 
tions; principal formulas of plane trigonometry, trigonometric equation, 
solution of triangles, and practical problems. Must be preceded or ac- 
companied by course 2a, or 2c. Stouffer, Marm, Black. 

36 — Plane Trigonometry. Three hours credit. First semester, 
9, 10; second semester, 8, 1. The same subjects as in 3a with the theory 
of logarithms and a short treatment of spherical trigonometry. Must be 
preceded or accompanied by course 2a, 26, or 2c. Mitchell, Black. 



164 The College. 

4. — Analytical Geometry I. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
10 and 11; second semester, at 8 and 10. The straight line, circle, and 
elementary curve tracing. Prerequisites, courses 2 and 3. Stouffer. 

5. — Calculus I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 10; sec- 
ond semester, at 8 and 10. Differential calculus; fundamental prin- 
ciples; derivatives; applications to geometry and mechanics; maxima and 
minima; indeterminates. Open to students who have completed or are 
taking course 4. Mitchell. 

6. — Analytical Geometry II. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
11; second semester, at 9. Conic sections; polar coordinates; loci 
problems; higher plane curves. Prerequisite, course 4. Ashton. 

7. — Calculus II. Three hours credit. First semester at 11; sec- 
ond semester, at 9. Integral calculus; integration; definite integrals; 
applications to lengths, areas, and volumes. Prerequisites, courses 5 
and 6; may be taken at the same time with course 6. Mitchell. 

9. — Solid Analytical Geometry.* Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 9. Solid analytical geometry of the straight line, plane, and the 
conicoids. Prerequisite, course 7. Stouffer. 

10. — Mathematical Theory of Investment-* Three hours credit. 
Second semester, at 11. This course will cover, first, the principles 
of infinite series as applied to annuities, etc., and the development of 
facility in logarithmic computation; second, the fundamentals of the 
theory of probability, with applications. Prerequisite, course 2. 

Van der Vries. 

11. — Theory of Equations.* Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9. Algebraic solution of cubic and quartic, symmetric functions, trans- 
formations of equations, solutions of numerical equations in one variable, 
systems of equations, determinants and elimination. Open to students 
who have had course 7, and to others upon permission of the instructor. 

Mitchell. 

50. — Analytic Mechanics. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
11. This course is recommended to those who desire a more thorough 
knowledge of the integral calculus and its practical applications. It will 
include center of gravity, moments of inertia, and the general theory of 
rectilinear and curvilinear motion in space. A large number of practical 
problems will be solved. Prerequisites, courses 2 to 7, and either 51 or 
physics 50. Van der Vries. 

51. — Differential Equations. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 9. Ordinary differential equations; integration in series; partial 
differential equations; applications to geometry and physics. Prerequi- 
sites, courses 2 to 7. Lefschetz. 

52. — Advanced Calculus. Three hours credit. First semester, at 
10. Critical review of the fundamental notions of calculus; expansion 
in series; definite integrals; multiple integrals; line integrals; applica- 
tions to geometry and physics. Prerequisites, courses 2 to 7. Ashton. 

53. — Elliptic Integrals. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 10. 
Elliptic integrals; Jacobian elliptic functions; applications to geometry 
and physics. Prerequisites, courses 2 to 7. Ashton. 

54. — Elementary Number Theory. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester at 8. Theory of divisibility, prime numbers, congruences, ele- 
ments of theory of residues and of representation of a number by the 
simplest quadratic forms. Lefschetz. 

55. — Series. Two hours credit. First semester, at 9. A study of 
selected topics in Fine's College Algebra. The idea of a number field ; the 
development of the number system of algebra; definition of irrational 
number; fundamental theorems on limits; convergence of infinite series; 
power series; operations with infinite series; binominal, exponential and 
logarithmic series; infinite products. Prerequisites, courses 2 to 7. 

Mitchell. 



Medicine. 165 

57. — Complex Numbers. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 10. 
Analytic and geometric properties of complex numbers; conditions of 
functionality; integration; circular transformation; applications. Pre- 
requisite, courses 55. Ashton. 

59. — Modern Geometry I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 
8. Fundamental forms; the principle of duality; perspectivity and 
projectivity between one-dimensional forms; one-dimensional coordinate 
systems; double ratio; linear transformations; involution; the harmonic 
properties of the complete quadrangle and quadrilateral. Prerequisites, 
courses 2 to 7. Stouffer. 

60. — Modern Geometry II. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
8. Two-dimensional coordinates, projective and special, both point and 
line; pencils and ranges of conies; collineations and introduction to con- 
tinuous groups of collineations in the plane. Prerequisite, course 59. 

Stouffer. 

62. — History of Mathematics. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 11. The historical development of elementary mathematics, includ- 
ing trigonometry, analytical geometry, and the calculus. Outlines, as- 
signed readings, and class discussions. Open to Seniors who have had 
course 7. Mitchell. 

MEDICINE. 

College students who have attained at least full Senior standing and 
who have credit for certain subjects named below may offer in satisfac- 
tion of all or part of the requirements of the Senior year the entire first 
year of the medical curriculum. To such students the College will grant 
the degree of bachelor of arts. 

College students who have attained at least full Junior standing and 
who have credit for certain subjects named below may offer in satisfac- 
tion of all or part of the requirements of the Junior and Senior years the 
entire first and second years of the medical curriculum. To such stu- 
dents the College will grant the degree of bachelor of science in medi- 
cine. 

The subjects, or equivalents, which must have been completed before 
admission to the Medical School are: 

Modern language, 2 hours. 

Chemistry, 10 hours, including at least 1 and 2. 

Physics, 1, 5a and 56, or 6a and 66. 

Biology, which should include zoology 3, and at least one course from 
zoology 1, 2, or botany 3. 

To secure this privilege of offering medical work towards the College 
degree, the student must have spent one full year in residence at the 
College previous to enrollment in medical courses and must be certified 
to the Medical School by the Dean of the College as having met all the 
requirements above named. He must also register in the College as well 
as the Medical School and be subject to such general regulations of the 
College Faculty as govern other Juniors and Seniors. 

A student who does not fully meet the entrance requirements to the 
Medical School will enroll in College classes necessary to complete such 
requirements, after which he may be admitted to the Medical School and 
enrolled in medical courses, but the aggregate number of hours of such 
enrollment in the two schools may not exceed that allowed to College 
students. 

Whenever a student has completed the medical work in accordance 
with the foregoing provisions, the Dean of the Medical School will sub- 
mit to the Dean of the College a certified statement of that fact accom- 
panied by the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Medicine 



166 The College. 

that such student be admitted to the appropriate College degree. The 
student will then be named to the College Faculty as a candidate for 
that degree. 

It should be noted that several of the courses embraced in the first 
three semesters of the medical curriculum are offered to College stu- 
dents in the various departments concerned. 

MUSIC. 

Professor : Skilton. 

Courses 50 and 51 are College courses and are open to all Juniors 
and Seniors. 

Courses 52 to 60 are courses in the School of Fine Arts and are open 
to College Juniors and Seniors who do not elect courses from other pro- 
fessional schools, but not more than fifteen hours may be counted to- 
wards the degree of bachelor of arts. Students desiring admission to 
these courses must register in the School of Fine Arts as well as in the 
College, and will be admitted to the classes as fine arts students. 

50. — Appreciation of Music. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
10. A course for those who wish to learn to understand music as 
listeners without necessarily being performers. The different styles of 
music are explained and illustrated, with special reference to the Uni- 
versity concerts. Skilton. 

51. — Development of Music Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10. Detailed examination of famous composers, with reference to 
the history of their time and country. Skilton. 

52. — Harmony. Two hours credit. 

53. — Harmony. Two hours credit. 

54. — Harmony. Two hours credit. 

55. — Harmony. Two hours credit. 

56. — Counterpoint- One hour credit. 

57. — Counterpoint. One hour credit. 

58. — Musical Composition. One hour credit. 

59. — Musical Composition. One hour credit. 

60. — Instrumentation- One hour credit. 

PHARMACY. 

Professors : Sayre, Nelson. 

50. — Biological Chemistry. Four or six hours credit. Second se- 
mester. For description, see Pharmacy School. 

51. — Advanced Biological Chemistry. Two, three, or five hours 
credit. Both semesters. A continuation of course 50. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY' 

Professors : Templin,* Hollands (Chairman of De- 
partment) ; Hunter.* 
Associate Professor: Dockeray.* 
Assistant Professor: Bills. 
Instructors: Paterson,* Faragher, Swabey. 

Equipment. This department occupies a suite in the east wing of the 
new Administration Building, including classrooms, a reading room held 
jointly with the mathematics department, and the psychological labora- 
tory. The philosophical library includes some 3,500 volumes, 3,000 of 
which are on the shelves of the reading room for ready reference by 

* Absent on leave. 



Philosophy and Psychology. 167 

students. The laboratory has twelve rooms equipped both for class work 
and research. 

Major Requirements. All students majoring in the department will 
be required to take at least two courses in psychology, and at least two 
courses in philosophy. Other elections will be determined by the special 
interests and purposes of the student. When such an arrangement seems 
expedient, students may satisfy all or part of the requirements for the 
major in this group, so far as these exceed those for the department 
major, by the election of allied subjects in other departments. Such stu- 
dents must state, in entering upon their major, to which of the four topics 
following they wish to give especial attention: (1) General Philosophy; 
(2) Ethics; (3) Logic and Methodology; (4) Psychology. Their selec- 
tion of allied subjects must be made from the corresponding group, as in- 
dicated below. 

ALLIED SUBJECTS IN GROUPS. 

General Philosophy. English 81, Browning and Tennyson; English 
82, Carlyle and Emerson; English 83, Milton and His Contemporaries; 
Greek 4, Plato; Greek 54, The Gorgias or Republic of Plato; Latin 55, 
Lucretius; Mathematics 5, 7, Calculus I and II; Physics 5a, 56, Ga, 66, 
General Physics; Physics 50, Mechanics and Heat; Physics 51, Light and 
Radiant Energy; Physiology 70; Romance 56, French Literature of the 
Eighteenth Century; Romance 90, Dante; Zoology 4, Development and 
Heredity. 

Ethics. Economics 70, 71, Labor Problems I and II; Economics 91, 
92, Value, Price, and Distribution of Wealth; Economics 93, 94, Economic 
Theory; History and Political Science 80, Principles of Political Science; 
History and Political Science 83, International Law; Sociology 54, Public 
Opinion; Sociology 55, Psychological Sociology; Sociology 57, Socialism; 
Sociology 58, Anthropology; Sociology 59, Ethnology; Sociology 62, De- 
velopment of Social Theory; Zoology 4, Development and Heredity. 

Logic and Methodology. Economics 68, Statistics; Mathematics 5, 7, 
Calculus I and II; Mathematics 10, Probability and Scatistics; Physics 
5a, 56, 6a, 66, General Physics; Physics 50, Mechanics and Heat; Physics 
51, Light and Radiant Energy. 

Psychology. Anatomy 1, Introductory Anatomy; Anatomy 5, Neurol- 
ogy; Physics 5a, 56, 6a, 66, General Physics; Physics 51, Light and 
Radiant Energy; Physiology 70; Sociology 54, Public Opinion; Sociology 
55, Psychological Sociology; Sociology 58, Anthropology; Sociology 59,- 
Ethnology; Zoology 3, Comparative Anatomy; Zoology 4, Development 
and Heredity; Zoology 55, Embryology. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

la. — General Psychology.* Three hours credit. Both semesters, M. 
W., at 10 and 3, and third hour by appointment. A general survey 
of the fields of psychology, with a careful study of the field of nor- 
mal human psychology. It is required for admission to other psychology 
courses and to the School of Education. Elementary courses in biolog- 
ical and physical sciences are valuable antecedents. It is recommended 
that 16 accompany this course. Hunter, Dockeray, and Paterson. 

16. — General Psychology Laboratory.* Two hours credit. Both 
semesters, M. W., 8-10 or 1-3, or at the same hours Tu. Th. Experiments 
supplementary to la, which must accompany or precede this course. 

Dockeray, Paterson. 

2a. — Sensory Processes and Feeling.* Three hours credit. Second 
semester, 11. This is a foundation course and should be taken im- 
mediately after la and 16 by those planning to major in psychology. 

Dockeray. 



168 The College. 

26. — Sensory Processes and Feeling Laboratory.* Two hours 
credit. Second semester, Tu. Th., 10-12. Experiments supplementary to 
2a, which must accompany or precede this course. Dockeray. 

50. — Attention, Learning, and Thought. Three hours credit. First 
semester, 11. Courses 16 and 2a are recommended as antecedents. 

Hunter. 

51. — Animal Behavior. Three hours credit. First semester, 9. 
Vertebrate behavior is emphasized. The topics discussed are: Tropisms, 
instincts, sensory discrimination, and higher capacities. Hunter. 

52. — Abnormal Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
9. A study of the subconscious in both the normal and the abnormal. 
Particular attention will also be given to hysteria and disintegrated 
personality. Dockeray. 

53. — Child Psychology. Two hours credit. First semester, 8. The 
mental development of the child in the preadolescent period. 

Dockeray. 

54. — Individual Psychology. Three hours credit. First semester, 8. 
A consideration of specific capacities, "general intelligence," sex differ- 
ences, special defects, and the relation between individual differences 
and social status. Paterson. 

55. — Social Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semester, 9. 
Social instincts and emotions, the psychology of social influence, and the 
self. Given in alternate years with course 56. (Given in 1917-'18.) 

Hunter. 

56. — Instinct and Emotion. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
9. An examination of the fundamental modes of acting and feeling. 
Given in alternate years with course 55. (Not given in 1917-'18.) 

Hunter. 

66. — Advanced Psychology of Learning. Two hours credit. Second 
semester by appointment. A study of the literature and experiments of 
memory and habit formation. A few typical experiments will be per- 
formed. Prerequisites, courses la, 2a, and 50. Hunter. 

67. — Principles of Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, at 11. A consideration of the history and problems of psychology. 
Prerequisites, courses la, 2a and 50. Hunter. 

68. — Advanced Psychology I. Two to five hours credit. First se- 
mester by appointment. This course provides for the individual study 
of special topics by advanced students. The subject will be determined 
by the desires of the students. Hunter, Dockeray, Paterson. 

69. — Advanced Psychology II. Two to five hours credit. Second 
semester by appointment. A continuation of course 68, but not neces- 
sarily preceded by it. Hunter, Dockeray, Paterson. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

10. — Elementary Logic* Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 9. 
Textbook course for beginners, presenting the elementary principles of 
deduction, induction, and circumstantial evidence. (N. B. — This course is 
open to first-year students who are to begin work in law in their Sopho- 
more year.) Swabey. 

11. — Introduction to Philosophy.* Two hours credit. Both semes- 
ters, at 10. Textbook course for beginners, presenting the general nature 
of philosophical problems and of the relation of philosophy to science, 
religion and art. Should be preceded by elementary courses in the bio- 
logical and physical sciences. Hollands, Swabey. 

70. — History of Philosophy I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 10. The development of philisophy in its relations to general culture, 



Philosophy and Psychology. 169 

scientific theory, education, politics, and religion, as well as in its more 
strictly metaphysical aspects. The work of the first term will ordinarily 
cover ancient philosophy from Thales to Plotinus, with special reference 
to Plato and Aristotle. This course has no prerequisites in the depart- 
ment, but is a natural sequel to the Sophomore courses. Hollands. 

71. — History of Philosophy II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10. A continuation of course 70, but not necessarily preceded by it; 
continuous election is advisable. Mediaeval and modern philosophy, from 
St. Augustine to the present. Hollands. 

72. — Philosophical Classics I. Two hours credit. First semester, 
at 10. This course furnishes an opportunity for the study of some of the 
works important in the history of philosophy. The authors read vary 
with succeeding terms. Must be preceded or accompanied by course 70, 
which it is intended to supplement. Swabey. 

73. — Philosophical Classics II. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10. A continuation of course 72. Must be accompanied or preceded 
by course 71, which it supplements., Swabey. 

74. — The Theory of Knowledge. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 11. The subject of the course is the problem of truth, with special 
reference to contemporary idealism, pragmatism, and realism. Pre- 
requisite, courses la, 3, and 70, 71. Hollands. 

75. — Metaphysics. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 11. Some 
typical tendencies and problems of contemporary thought will be examined 
and discussed in connection with the positive development of the subject. 
Prerequisites, courses 70, 71. Hollands. 

76. — The Philosophy of Religion. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 10. After a preliminary examination of some of the theories 
concerning the origin and development of religion, in connection with the 
anthropological and psychological data, this course will consider some of 
the problems common to religion and philosophy. Prerequisites, courses 
la, and either 4, 70 or 71. (Alternates with 75.) Hollands. 

77. — Advanced Logic. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 1. A 
sequel to course 3, with attention to some of the philosophical aspects and 
problems of logic. Considerable outside reading is required. Prerequisite, 
course 3. Swabey. 

80— Systematic Ethics. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11. 
This course undertakes a critical examination into the psychological 
sources of human conduct, a review of the historic ethical theories, and 
the development of a satisfactory ethical system. Prerequisites, courses 
la, and either 4, 70, or 71. Templin. 

81. — Practical Ethics. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 9. 
The application of theoretical principles of conduct to practical problems 
of life. Prerequisite, course 80. Templin. 

82. — ^Esthetics. Two hours credit. "Second semester, 9. The analysis 
of the beautiful and the comic. This course should be preceded by course 
la. Templin. 

83. — Philosophy o? the State: Political and Social Ethics. Three 
hours credit. Second semester, at 9. This course will examine the 
philosophy and ethics of social organization. Among the topics con- 
sidered will be: the ends served by various types of organization; the 
nature and limits of sovereignty; authority and freedom; ancient and 
modern theories of the "absolute state"; the state as an organization of 
freemen; the independent rights of organizations other than the state. 

Hollands. 



170 The College. 

physical education. 

Professor: Naismith* (Head of Department). 
Associate Professor : Goetz. 
Instructors ; Pratt, Cole, Steger. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. The courses listed as exercises 
are designated primarily to secure health, recreation, and physical skill. 

Course 20 is intended to teach the best methods of keeping the body 
at its highest efficiency, and of caring for it in emergencies. 

Courses 50-58 are designed for the training of those who wish to 
become physical directors, coaches, managers, or any combination of 
these. Those looking forward to this work should take, in their Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years, at least one course in each of the following: 
anatomy, physiology, physics, chemistry, and psychology. 

All Freshmen are required to take some form of exercise at least 
three times, and Sophomores twice, per week. An election from the listed 
courses is permitted according to the needs and wishes of the student. 

A physical and medical examination is given to every student on en- 
trance, and is used to determine the kind and amount of exercise best 
adapted for the individual. Abnormalities and conditions which af- 
fect the efficiency of the student will be pointed out; and, in so far as 
possible, he will be assisted in removing them. 

Communications from parents or family physicians regarding the 
health of the student will be welcomed and will be of material assistance 
in directing his activities. 

COURSES OF EXERCISE FOR MEN. 

Exercise 1 and 2 are required of all Freshmen. Exercise 3 and 4 
are required of all Sophomores. Exercise 5 to 10 are open, without 
credit, to College students, or may, by the direction of the instructor, 
constitute parts of the preceding exercises. 

Exercise I.** First semester, M. W. F., at 10:30, 11:30, 2:30, 3:30, 
4:30. First half: recreative games and. sports. Second half calisthenics, 
apparatus, and swimming. 

Exercise 2.** Second semester, M. W. F., at 10:30, 11:30, 2:30, 3:30, 
4:30. First half: apparatus, swimming, and indoor games. Second 
half: outdoor games, track and field sports, and advanced swimming. 

Exercise 3. First semester, Tu. Th., at 11:30, 2:30, 3:30. Advanced 
calisthenics and apparatus work, squad leading, exhibition gymnastics, 
and rescue swimming. Required of Sophomores. 

Exercise 4. Second semester, Tu. Th., at 11 :30, 2 :30, 3 :30. Defensive 
sports, aquatics, squad leading, and advanced gymnastics. Required of 
Sophomores. 

Exercise 5. First half first semester, daily, at 3:30. Freshman foot- 
ball. 

Exercise 6. First half of first semester, daily, at 3:30. Varsity and 
class football, to which Sophomores are eligible. 

Exercise 7. Second half of first semester, daily, at 7 p. m. Basket 
ball, Freshman and varsity, to which Sophomores are eligible. 

Exercise 8. First semester, daily, at 3:30. Track, Freshman and 
varsity, to which Sophomores are eligible. 

Exercise 9. Second semester, daily, at 3 :30. Continuation of course 8. 

Exercise 10. Second semester, daily, at 2:30. Baseball, Freshman 
and varsity, to which Sophomores are eligible. 

* Absent on leave. 



Physical Education. 171 

COURSES OF EXERCISE FOR WOMfiN. 

Students will not be permitted to engage in strenuous exercises that 
are beyond their development or that are likely to injure them, but will 
be encouraged to take part in the games that are adapted to benefit them. 

Students not strong enough to take the regular class work will be 
given work of such a nature as to meet their special needs. 

A regulation gymnasium costume is required, which may be pur- 
chased after reaching the University. Gymnasium shoes with leather 
soles must be worn in the gymnasium, and may be purchased in Law- 
rence. The dressing rooms are provided with ventilated steel lockers, 
shower baths, and hair dryers. There is a woman attendant. 

Advanced students may elect any of the forms of exercise in which 
they are particularly interested. 

Exercise 1.** First semester, M. W. F., at 10:30, 11:30, 2:30, 3:30. 
Calisthenics, wands, dumb-bells, pully weights, elastic exercises, folk 
dances and gymnastic games. 

Exercise 2.** Second semester, M. W. F., at 10:30, 11:30, 2:30, 3:30. 
Continuation of course 1. Prerequisite, course 1, or its equivalent. 

Exercise 3. First semester, Tu. Th., 11:30, 2:30, 3:30. Swedish gym- 
nastics, folk dancing, esthetic and rhythmical exercises; Indian clubs. 
Prerequisite, course 2. Required of Sophomores. 

Exercise 4. Second semester, Tu. Th., at 11:30, 2:30, 3:30. A con- 
tinuation of course 3. Prerequisite, course 3. Required of Sophomores. 

Exercise 5. First semester daily, at 11:30. Advanced gymnastics, 
esthetic dancing, Swedish work, and games. Prerequisites, course 1 to 
4, or their equivalents. 

Exercise 6. Second semester, daily, at 11:30. A continuation of 
course 5. 

Exercise 7. Both semesters, daily at 11:30 or 2:30. Corrective gym- 
nastics, arranged for those students who need special forms of exercise 
for correction of bodily defects. 

Swimming. The swimming pool is used by the women students on 
Monday and Thursday from 10:30 to 12:30, 2:30 to 5:30. All students 
are advised to learn to swim. 

Basketball. Regular practice is held Tu. Th., at 4:30, but organized 
teams may play at any time when the floor is unoccupied. Interclass 
games will be held at the regular hour. 

Tennis. There are five courts on South Field reserved for the women 
students. 

Field Hockey. On Friday the classes in exercises 2 and 3 may sub- 
stitute hockey for regular work. Class and other teams may be organized, 
and have regular hours for practice on South Field. Hockey sticks and 
balls are provided by the University. 

Other games may be played whenever the field is unoccupied and when 
groups of students select a time. 

Archery. Bows and arrows are provided for beginners, and contests 
are held at the close of the season. 

HYGIENE. 

20. — Hygiene.** Required of all Freshmen, men and women. Weekly 
lecture, first semester, at one of the following periods: Men: M., 4:30; 
Tu., 11:30; W., 1:30: Women W., 10:30, 4:30; Th. 11:30, 4:30. 

Naismith, Goetz. 

CREDIT COURSES. 

50. — Kinesiology. Three hours credit. First semester, 8:30 to 10:30. 
A study of the human body as a mechanism; the muscles demanded and 
developed by exercise; muscles required in different forms of athletics; 
corrective exercises; message. Prerequisite, elementary anatomy. 

Naismith. 



172 The College. 

i Q 5 n 1, ~A PH Pi OL °5 Y . 1 OF Exercise. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
1:60. A study of the effects of exercise on the various systems of the 
body; effect of strain; feats of endurance; hygienic and recreative exer- 
cises; methods of development. Prerequisite, physiology 1. 

r>u 52 -'~ 1 A ^ THR( ? POMETRY - Two hours credit - Second semester, 8:30 
Physical, functional, and medical examination; tabulation and the use of 
the data of examination; the making of charts and diagrams and their 
use. bhould be preceded by anatomy I and physiology I. Naismith. 
rr 55 -— Principle s of Gymnastics I. Two hours credit. First semester, 
Tu. Th 9:30. A study of the systems of physical education— German] 
bwedish, French, and English. The development of modern gymnastics 
and their application to school and colleges; analysis of exercises and 
drills. Prerequisite, Freshmen and Sophomore courses; should also be 
preceded by 50, 51, and 52. 

56.— Principles of Gymnastics II. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, M. W. F., 9:30. A continuation of course 55, and must be pre- 
ceded by it. 

57. — Principles of Recreative Sports I. Two hours credit. First 
semester, Tu. Th., 10:30. A study of festivals and games, ancient and 
modern; their place and value; their classification. Methods of conduct- 
ing recreative games, sports, and play festivals; playground technic. 
Should be preceded by 50, 51, and 52. Pratt. 

58. — Principles of Recreative Sports II. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, Tu. Th., 10:30. A continuation of course 57, and should be 
preceded by it. Pratt. 

59. — Physical Development of the Child. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester M. W. F., 8:30. A study of the influence of heredity, nu- 
trition, rest, exercise, training, curve of growth, effects of development 
and habits and character. Naismith. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

Professor : Kester. 

Associate Professor: Rice. 

Assistant Professors: Stimpson, Smith, Alter. 

Instructor: Whittemore.* 

Equipment. The department occupies Blake Hall. The lecture rooms, 
laboratory and research rooms of the building are well supplied with 
water and gas and with various electrical circuits; the laboratory and 
research rooms are provided with piers .free from vibration. A well- 
equipped shop and the services of an instrument maker are available for 
the construction of apparatus needed for special work. The equipment of 
apparatus for demonstration and regular laboratory work and for special 
investigation is good and is being increased constantly by well-chosen 
additions. 

The physics library contains a fine collection of standard treatises, both 
elementary and advanced. American, English, German, French, and 
Italian journals of the sciences are at hand, with bound volumes for from 
twenty-five to forty years; the files of the more important journals have 
been extended back from seventy to ninety years. The published trans- 
actions and proceedings of a large number of the important physical 
societies of the world add notably to the value of the library 'for use in 
special fields of investigation. 

The material equipment in astronomy consists of a six-inch telescope, 
made by Alvin Clark & Sons, on a portable equatorial tripod mounting; 
an equatorial clock-drive and a micrometer eye-piece have been purchased 
for this telescope; a two-inch terrestrial telescope on a portable altazi- 
muth mounting; one two-inch and one three-inch transit instrument; 

* Absent on leave. 



Physics and Astronomy. 173 

a sextant; a spectroscope for attachments the six-inch telescope; a fine 
comparator for photographic plate measurements ; two chronometers, one 
a break-circuit instrument; a chronograph; a twenty-inch celestial globe; 
600 astronomical slides; star charts, atlases, maps, drawings, etc. In 
addition, the equipment in physics is available for demonstrations and for 
laboratory work. A temporary observatory, with class rooms, and ad- 
ditional apparatus will be added during the summer of 1919. 

The astronomical library contains about 600 volumes, including some 
of the more important journals of the science. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Physics. — The courses in physics 
are arranged to give, first, a general survey of the whole subject in the 
elementary and general courses (2, and 3 and 4) ; second, a more in- 
tensive study of the well-defined fundamental parts of the science in the 
courses 50 to 53 (with appropriate laboratory courses 55 to 57) ; and 
third, an opportunity to enter the more special fields in the courses 58 
to 61. Courses 3 and 4 (general physics), or their equivalents, are neces- 
sary for enrollment in any other course in physics. They are open 
to all students of the College. Courses 50 to 65 are open to Juniors and 
Seniors and to graduate students. Courses 50, 51, 52, and 53, with ac- 
companying laboratory courses, should all be taken by students making 
physics their major, and courses 58, 60, and 61 may be added. Courses 
53, 58 and 60 do not presuppose the calculus. Students expecting to do 
advanced work in physics should obtain as early as practicable a working 
knowledge of the calculus. A reading knowledge of German and French 
is desirable for those who elect the advanced courses and is essential for 
graduates. Members of the department are glad to confer with students 
who intend to major in physics, and with those who intend to teach 
this science in high schools, as to the choice of courses best adapted to 
their needs. 

Astronomy. — Students wishing only a general knowledge of the subject 
are advised to take only astronomy 10, 11, and 83. The other courses are 
designed for students majoring in astronomy, other physical sciences or 
mathematics. 

PHYSICS. 

2. — The Development of Physics, Including Recent Advances, 
Five hours credit. First semester, M. W. F., 9; Tu. Th., 8 to 10; lec- 
tures, recitations, and laboratory work. A topical survey, the arrange- 
ment of topics such as to trace the development of methods and the 
growth of fundamental ideas. Considerable attention will be given to 
recent tendencies. (The course does not duplicate high-school physics. 
It may not be counted in fulfillment of entrance requirements of the 
School of Medicine.) Prerequisite, plane geometry. Laboratory fee, $1. 

Kester. 

3a. — General Physics. Mechanics, sound, and heat. Three hours 
credit. First semester, at 11. Lectures, recitations, problems. Pre- 
requisites, elementary physics, or elementary chemistry, and plane trigo- 
nometry. Course 3a should be accompanied by 4a. Smith. 

36. — General Physics. Light and electricity. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, at 11. A continuation of course 3a. Prerequisite, course 
3a. Course 36 should be accompanied by 46. Smith. 

4a — General Physics Laboratory. Mechanics, sound, and heat. 
Two hours credit. First semester, S., 8 to 12. Accompanied by or pre- 
ceded by 3a. Fee, $1.50. Stimpson. 

46. — General Physics Laboratory. Light and electricity. Two 
hours credit. Second semester, S., 8 to 12. Coordinate with 36, with the 
same prerequisites. Course 46 must be accompanied or preceded by 36. 
Fee, $1.50. Stimpson. 



174 The College. 

50.— Mechanics and Heat. Three hours credit. First semester, at 
8. Lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, a year's work in general 
physics, and calculus. Kester. 

It is recommended that this course be followed by Mathematics 50, Analytical Me- 
chanics, three hours, second semester. 

51.— Light and Radiant Energy. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 8. Prerequisites, a year's work in general physics, and cal- 
culus. Offered in alternate years. Smith. 

52.— Electricity. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and problems. Prerequisites, a year's work in general 
physics, and calculus. Rice. 

53.— Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, at 9. Prerequisite, a year's work in general physics. 
Offered in alternate years. (Not offered in 1919-'20.) Kester. 

Courses 50, 51, 52, and 53 are designed to form a two-year cycle for theoretical 
treatment of the essentials of the subject matter of physics. The cycle is offered especially 
for Juniors and Seniors who are taking their major in physics. Either year of it is 
acceptable as a minor for graduate students who are working for the master's degree with 
their major in another department. An opportunity is offered in the laboratory courses 
55 to 57 for experimental work which shall supplement to any desired extent the theo- 
retical development of a given branch of the subject. 

54. — Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy. Three hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. A study of the fundamentals of wireless 
telegraphy. Prerequisite, a course in general physics. Some use is also 
made of calculus. Rice. 

55. — Physical Laroratory. Light and radiant energy. Two to five 
hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. Prerequisite, a year's 
work in general physics. Fee, $1.50 to $3.00. Smith. 

56. — Physics Laboratory. Electricity. Two to five hours credit. 
Both semesters, by appointment. Prerequisite, a year's work in general 
physics. Fee, $1.50 to $3. Rice. 

57. — Physics Laboratory. Conduction of electricity through gases, 
and radioactivity. Two or three hours credit, second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Prerequisite, course 53 or equivalent. Fee, $1.50 or $2. 

Kester. 

Courses 54, 55, 56, 57 are coordinate with 50, 51, 52, 53, with the same prerequi- 
sites, and supplement them from an experimental point of view. 

58. — Temperature Control and Measurement. "Three hours credit. 
Second semester, Tu., at 8; Th., 8 to 10; S., 8 to 11. This course will 
treat the subjects of the maintenance of constant temperatures, high and 
low; the various methods of measuring temperatures and of standardizing 
instruments, such as the platinum resistance thermometer, the thermo- 
electric couple, the pyrometer. Offered in alternate years. Fee, $2. 

Kester. 

59. — Electric Wave Telegraphy Laboratory. Two to four hours 
credit. First semester by appointment. Must be preceded by or accom- 
pany course 54. An experimental study of the production of oscillations, 
measurement of the quantities involved and methods of reception in 
wireless telegraphy. Rice. 

60. — Optical Instruments. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
8. This course is coordinate with 51, treating the theory of light only 
in so far as it relates to applied optics. Offered in alternate years. (Not 
offered in 1919-'20). Smith. 

61. — Alternating and Oscillating Currents. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Lectures, recitations, and problems. 
A continuation of course 52, dealing with the mathematical theory of 
alternating and oscillating currents and the propagation of varying elec- 
tric currents in wires. Prerequisites, courses 52 and some work in course 
56, or equivalent, and a good working knowledge of calculus. Offered 
in alternate years. Rice. 



Physiology. 175 

63a. — Physics Colloquium. One hour credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. The members and the advanced students of the department 
meet once a week to report on researches published in the journals of the 
science and on the progress of original investigations carried on by mem- 
bers of the colloquium. 

636. — Physics Colloquium. One hour credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. A continuation of course 63a. 

65. — Elementary Acoustics. One hour credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. A course of twenty lectures, with demonstrations, upon the 
scientific basis of harmony. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 
1919-'20). Stimpson. 

ASTRONOMY. 

10. — Descriptive Astronomy. Four hours credit. Both semesters, at 
9:30, M. W. F; recitation sections one hour, by appointment. An ele- 
mentary course serving as an introduction to the subject. Alter. 

11. — Observational Astronomy. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 
Stress is laid on methods which may be carried on without the aid of 
large instruments, and which can be continued by the student independ- 
ently. Astronomy 10 must accompany or precede this course, which is 
the laboratory part of descriptive astronomy. One evening and one after- 
noon a week. Alter. 

82. — Spherical and Practical Astronomy. Three hours credit 
through the year, by appointment. Transformation of coordinates, time, 
sextant, transit, refraction. Prerequisites, descriptive astronomy and 
trigonometry. Alter. 

83. — History of Astronomy. Three hours, first semester, by appoint- 
ment. A lecture course in which the material is drawn from various 
sources. Lantern slides will be used freely. Alter. 

84. — Introduction to Astrophysics. Three hours credit, second se- 
mester, by appointment. A study of the principles, methods and instru- 
ments employed in investigating the physical conditions of celestial 
bodies. Prerequisites, descriptive astronomy and a year's work in gen- 
eral physics. Alter. 

85. — Method of Least Squares. Three hours credit, first semester, 
by appointment. A study of the theory of errors and of the accuracy of 
observations. Alter. 

86. — Theory and Practice of Interpolation Three hours credit, 
second semester, by appointment. Practical work in mechanical differ- 
entiation and integration, especially applied to the computation of 
physical problems which are otherwise very difficult. Alter. 

87. — Theoretical Astronomy. Five hours through the year, by ap- 
pointment. This course will involve a great deal of computation. 

Alter. 

88. — Vector Analysis. Three hours credit, first semester, by appoint- 
ment. The study of directed quantities, of the algebra concerned, and of 
the applications to physical problems. Alter. 

89. — Vectorial Mechanics. Three hours credit, second semester, by 
appointment. Alter. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

Professors: Hyde, Stoland (Chairman of Department). 

Assistant Professor: Welker. 

Instructor : Walling. 

Assistant Instructor : Endacott. 

Equipment. The department occupies the second floor of the Jour- 
nalism Building, one room in Fraser Hall, and laboratory and office 
rooms on the second floor of Snow Hall. The laboratory and research 
rooms are well eouinped with suitable tables and supplied wUh water 
and gas. The equipment of apparatus, glassware, and chemicals is ade- 



176 The College. 

quate for ordinary demonstrations and laboratory work in general physi- 
ology, and for some lines of research. The department library contains 
the more important reference books and complete files of the leading 
physiological journals. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Physiology 1 and 2 cover the field 
of physiology in an elementary way, and are intended for students who 
are not prepared to pursue advanced courses in physiology, but desire 
some knowledge of the subject. Course 1 includes such topics as are 
most desirable for those who do not care to take more than one course 
in physiology. Students who are making the biological sciences their 
major study and are prepared in chemistry and physics are advised to 
select their work from courses 50, 51, 61, 70 and 71. Students who wish 
to make physiology their major study should have had physics, chemistry 
(including elementary organic chemistry), zoology, and either compara- 
tive anatomy or human anatomy. The required number of hours may be 
selected from courses 50, 51, 61, 62, 63, 70 and 71. 

Fees will be charged in the various courses to cover the cost of ma- 
terials used.. 

1. — Elementary Physiology. Five hours credit. Both semesters. 
Recitations, M. W. F., at 9:30, 10:30, or 1:30. Laboratory, Tu. Th., 8:30 
to 10:30, 10:30 to 12:30, or 1:30 to 3:30. A course dealing especially 
with the nourishment of the body. It will include a study of the proper- 
ties of living matter, the foods and their digestion and absorption, the 
functions of blood, the organs of circulation and their activities, breath- 
ing and respiration, metabolism and excretion. Biology, chemistry, and 
physics are highly desirable antecedents to the course. 

Walling, Endacott. 

2. — Elementary Physiology. Five hours credit. Second semester. 
Recitations, M. W. F., at 1:30. Laboratory, Tu. Th., 10:30 to 12:30. A 
continuation of course 1. It includes a study of muscles, heat regula- 
tion, nerve, reflexes, brain, special senses, and the glands of internal 
secretion. Walling. 

50. — Physiology of the Mechanisms of Nutrition Five hours 
credit. First semester. Lectures and recitations, M: W. F., 9:30. 
Laboratory, four hours by appointment. A course intended for students 
who have had some preparation in chemistry and biology. Not open to 
students who have had physiology 1. Stoland and . 

51. — Physiology of Movement and Sensation. Five hours credit. 
Second semester. Lectures and recitations, M. W. F., at 9:30. Labora- 
tory, four hours by appointment. A course dealing with the physiology 
of muscle and nerve, the central nervous system and special senses. Gen- 
eral Physics and a course on the structure of the nervous system are 
highly desirable antecedents. Not open to students who have had physi- 
ology 2. Stoland, Walling. 

61. — Experimental Physiology. Three hours credit. Both semes- 
ters. Two laboratory periods and one hour conference per week, by 
appointment. A course intended to familiarize the students of physi- 
ology with the laboratory experiments on mammals and other animals. 
Prerequisite, any previous course in physiology. Stoland. 

62. — Physiology of the Organs of Internal Secretion. Three to 
five hours credit. Second semester. Hours by appointment. A course 
which includes a study of the organs of internal secretion and their re- 
lations to the body activities. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory 
work. Prerequisites, courses 1 and 2, or any advanced course in physi- 
ology. Stoland. ' 

63. — Special Problems in Physiology. Two to seven hours credit. 
Both semesters. Hours by appointment. A course intended for students 
who wish to pursue special laboratory work or investigation, either in- 
dependently or in conjunction with members of the staff. Stoland. 



Public Speaking. 177 

70.— Medical Physiology I. Five hours credit. Second semester 
i L i eC on re 2£ d re " ta . tl 1 on ' M ' W ' F " at 8 -30. Laboratory, Tu. Th 8 30 to 
ll™ t? physiol °^. ° f blood, circulation, respiration, muscle and 
l r n ve ; n ?}Z C0 Tj l l mt ™ d u ed especially for medical students, bu?is 
open to college students who have the proper preparation. 

_. __. „ Stoland, Welker. 

71.— Medical Physiology II. Five hours credit. First semester 
Lectures and recitations, M W. P., at 8:30. Laboratory, Tu Th 8 36 
to 11:30 The physiology of the central nervous system, the senses the 
digestive tract, secretion, metabolism, excretion, heat regulation internal 
secretion. A continuation of course 70. Stoland? Wdklr. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

Professor: MacMurray (Head of Department). 
Instructor: Siiinn. 

Equipment. The special equipment of this department includes a col- 
lection of more than 200 books, to which carefully selected modern works 
dealing with debating and public addresses are added yearly Though 
the courtesy of the Dean of the School of Law, rooms in Green Hall haf e 
been specially fitted for the work in public speaking, and the UnlveS 
chapel and other rooms are available for class recitations and inSual 
practice Moreover, the students in this department are uV^ed to make 
constant use of books m the English, history, political science^, economics 
reTpTriodfcal's ' ° **** C ° llections ' as wel1 as of the various cur^ 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. The courses here offered are care- 
fully articulated units, and are so arranged as to make possible Vsvs 
tematic study of public speaking. Students fitting tSmselVe for the law 
or the ministry, for politics or social service, are urged to elect the entire 
series of courses offered. The University of Kansas participate ^ m de- 
bates with the Universities of Oklahoma, Colorado, and Missouri. For 
these contests the courses in public speaking are designed to give 
preparation Men desiring to win places on intercollegiate debating 
teams are advised to take as much of the work as possible, but especially 

ti^\T?w 5 | T1 T C ° U /l e ln ^ he P rinci P les of argumentation formerly 
given by this department has been transferred to the department of 
English, and may now be taken as course 3 in rhetoric. While it is not 
made a prerequisite it is strongly advised as a preparation to course 52 
in debating. In fact students who have not had the course in argu- 
mentation must be able to satisfy this department in some other way of 
their preparation for course 52 in debating. y 

To facilitate the work of the courses in dramatic art, a small but neat 
and practical stage has been fitted up in room 3, Green Hall. In addition 
to the regular class work the rehearsals for class and dramatic club plays 
are held m this room. l * 

1.— Oral Interpretation L* Two hours credit. Both semesters First 
semester, two sections, Tu. Th., at 8; M. W., at 10. The purpose of 
this course is to enable the student to attain to some proficiency in 
the art of oral interpretation of literature. In connection with the prac- 
tice work upon the platform, the student will be given such points of 
theory as are necessary m regard to the development and use of the voice 
and m regard to proper platform deportment. MacMurray, Shinn 

rri? ,— ?Q A V N 7^ RPI l ET o ATI ^- IL * T wo hours credit. Both semesters. Tu. 
Ih at 9, M. W., at 8. This course will be a continuation of course 1 
and will afford a more advanced study of the art of oral interpretation ' 
Prerequisite, course 1. MacMurray" Shinn ' 

M " BA ™|' Two hours credit. First semester, two sections; 
M., 3 to 5, Tu., 3 to 5. Practical work in brief drawing and the handling 

12— K. U.— 5419. 



178 The College. 

of evidence, together with presentation in actual debate. The class is 
limited in number, and the course can be taken only with the consent of 
the instructor. It is recommended that course 3 in rhetoric be taken be- 
fore or in connection with this course. Shinn. 

6. — Debating II. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 
ment. This course is a continuation of course 5, and affords an opportu- 
nity for more advanced and intensive study of debating methods. Pre- 
requisite, course 5. Shinn. 

50. — Extempore Speaking I. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 
First semester, three sections; Tu. Th., at 10; Tu. Th., at 2. Weekly 
addresses based on prepared outlines. Careful preparation of material 
is required ; the plan of speech is made in advance, but the choice of lan- 
guage is left for the moment of speaking. MacMurray, Shinn. 

51. — Extempore Speaking II. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 
Tu. Th., at 11. A continuation of extempore speaking I; same methods, 
but work is of more advanced nature. Lectures by head of department, 
and attention given to solution of special problems in public speaking. 
Prerequisite, course 50. MacMurray. 

54. — Advanced Public Speaking. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, T. Th., at 11. In addition to the regular class instruction, special 
instruction will be given in preparing lectures and recitals for the public 
platform. A carefully prepared production of some length will be re- 
quired of each student by the end of the semester. Prerequisites, courses 
1 and 2. MacMurray. 

60. — Dramatic Art I. Two hours credit. First semester, M., 3 to 5. 
Training in the interpretation of the drama and instruction in stage 
technique. Standard and classic plays will be studied and presented, and 
each student will be assigned definite roles to interpret. MacMurray. 

61. — Dramatic Art II. Two hours credit. Second semester, M., 3 to 5. 
A continuation of course 60. The work will be similar in character but 
of a more advanced nature. Prerequisite, course 60. MacMurray. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professor: Galloo (Head of Department). 
Associate Professor: Netjen Schwander. 
Assistant Professors: Stanton, Mahieu. 
Instructors: Cram, Hess, Scrutchfield, Owens, O'Keefe, 
Perry, Carman, Johns, Thurnau. 

Equipment. The department of Romance languages and literatures 
possesses a collection of illustrative material consisting of several hun- 
dred photographs, stereopticon slides, maps, plans, plaster casts, etc., il- 
lustrating the history, architecture, life, and general culture of the Ro- 
mance nations. 

The Romance library of the University contains 3,686 volumes, which 
cover in a representative way the literary development of France, Italy, 
and minor Romance languages and dialects, from the earliest times to the 
present day. Twenty-seven periodicals are received, which include all the 
important literary and philological journals devoted to the Romance lan- 
guages. 

Advice as to Choice of Courses. Students who intend to take a major 
in this field, should consult with the department before the end of their 
sophomore year. ' 

A major in French includes, as prescribed work, courses 3, 4, 6, 7 or 11, 
10 53, 54 and six hours of French literature or linguistics, with addi- 
tional ' courses to be suggested with a view to the vocations for which 
the students are fitting themselves. 

For a major in French and Italian,, courses 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, and 80, 
are substituted for courses in French, according to the preparation and 
needs of the students. 



Romance Languages and Literatures. 179 

All students whose major is in French are advised to elect courses in 
Spanish and Italian in mediaeval and modern European history, and in 
the history of English literature; and if they purpose to teach, they 
should take, m addition to the required work in education, the course in 
oral composition. 

Graduate work in this department presupposes a fair acquaintance 
with Latin, with elementary Spanish and Italian, and a reading knowl- 
edge of German. 6 

FRENCH. 

q Q 1 n~;? L Qn IE i 1 J T tS Y F ^? C ?- Five hours credit. First semester, at 8:30,. 
y.du, 10:60, 11:30, and 1:30; second semester, at 8:30, 9:30, 11:30 and 
f:30. Grammar (Fraser and Squair) and easy reading. Drill in pronun- 
ciation, accidence, and elementary syntax. Neuen Schwander. 
Mahieu, Cram, Hess, Scrutchfield, Perry, Carman. 
2 —French Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit. Second se- 
Z**™' *$ 9 : on°' 9 = 30 ' 10:30 ' 11=80, and 1:30; first semester, at 8:30, 
10.30, and 2:30. Reading of simple prose texts, with exercises in dicta- 
tion and elementary composition. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Neuen Schwander, Stanton, Cram, Hess, Scrutchfield, 
Owens, Johns, Thurnau. 

q Q 3 n~"i^°o D n ERN ? R , E ^ H Writers. Three hours credit. Both semesters, 
y:du, 11:30, and 1:30. Translation and reading of works of Merimee, 
George Sand, Victor Hugo, Anatole France, and Rene Bazin. Pre- 
requisite, course 2. Neuen Schwander, Mahieu, O'Keefe, Perry. 
11 4 -r- FR EN c H Composition. Two hours credit. Both semesters, at 9:30, 
ll:30, and 1:30. Written exercises for grammatical review; free com- 
position; oral exercises; dictation. Must be preceded or accompanied by 
course 3 - Stanton, Mahieu, O'Keefe, Perry, Cram. 

5.— Scientific French. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Open to students who are specializing in the sciences and 
who need an accurate and ready understanding of scientific French Pre- 
requisites, courses 1 and 2. Owens. 

* ^,To? ra ?, CH J ? R0SE AND PoETRY - Thre e hours credit. Both semesters, 
at 1U :30. Reading of representative works of the seventeenth, eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries. Prerequisites, courses 3 and 4; may be taken 
m the same semester as course 4. Neuen Schwander, Stanton. 

7.— French Composition. Two hours credit. Both semesters by ap- 
pointment. A continuation of course 4, intended to provide additional 
practice m writing and speaking French. Stanton, Cram. 

8.— Corneille. Two hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 
Reading of his greatest tragedies. Must be preceded by 3 and 4, and 
should be by 6. Galloo> Stanton . 

9.— Racine. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. 
Reading of his greatest tragedies. Must be preceded by 3 and 4, and 
should be by 6 and 8. Galloo, Mahieu. 

10.— Oral French Composition I. Two hours credit. Three recita- 
tions a week, first semester. This course is conducted entirely in French 
and the idiomatic use of the spoken tongue is emphasized. Regular at- 
tendance at the meetings of the Cercle Francais is expected of the stu- 
dents who elect this course. Must be preceded by 3 and 4, and preceded 
or accompanied by either 6 or 8, or their equivalents. By appointment. 

Mahieu. 

11.— Oral French Composition II. Two hours credit. Three recita- 
tions a week, second semester, by appointment. Continuation of course 10. 

Mahieu. 
* . 12 ;— ; m °liere. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11:30 Care- 
ful study of the more important plays, rapid reading of the others; re- 



180 The College. 

ports in French by members of the class. Should be preceded by 6 or its 
equivalent. Galloo. 

13. — French Composition, Written and Oral. Two hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. Practice in writing and speaking 
French. Prerequisite, 4 or 7. Stanton, Mahieu. 

14. — Advanced French Composition. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Translation, original composition, and prac- 
tice in speaking French. Prerequisite, 7 or 13. Galoo. 

50. — The French Element in English. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. A study of the influence of French upon the 
vocabulary and syntax of the English language, with especial reference 
to Norman and post-Norman periods. The course will be conducted in 
English. Neuen Schwander. 

51. — French I. Five hours credit. First semester, at 10:30. For 
Juniors and Seniors who are beginning French. The aim of this course 
is to give some insight into the fundamental principles of language, to- 
gether with a more comprehensive acquaintance with French and wider 
reading than in the usual elementary courses for Freshmen ano; Sopho- 
mores. Galloo, Stanton. 

52. — French Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit. Second 
semester, at 10:30. A continuation of course 51. Galloo, Owens. 

53. — History of Early French Literature. Three hours credit. 
First semester, by appointment. From the earliest times to the classic 
period. Lectures, recitations, and private readings. Mahieu. 

54. — History of Modern French Literature. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. From the beginning of the classic 
period to the present day. Lectures, recitations, and private readings. 

Stanton. 

55. — French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Two hours 
credit. First semester, by appointment. A study of the development of 
French literature from Malherbe to the end of the reign of Louis XIV. 

Galloo, Stanton. 

56. — French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Two hours 
credit. Second semester, by appointment. Special attention is paid to 
the life and works of Voltaire; study of Montesquieu, Rousseau and the 
encyclopedists; the dramatists. Neuen Schwander, Mahieu. 

57. — The Romantic School I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
by appointment. A study of the rise of romanticism in France and of 
its characteristic products in poetry, the novel, and the drama. Lamar- 
tine, A. de Vigny, and A. de Musset. Galloo, Mahieu. 

58. — The Romantic School II. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. A continuation of course 57, devoted chiefly to Victor 
Hugo's works. Galloo, Mahieu. 

59. — The Literary Movement in the Second Half of the Nine- 
teenth Century I. Three hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 
The reaction against romanticism, the Parnassiens, realism and natural- 
ism. The reaction against the scientific spirit, idealism and symbolism. 
The rise and growth of the new literary criticism. Galloo. 

60. — The Literary Movement in the Second Half of the Nine- 
teenth Century II. Three hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 
ment. Continuation of course 59. Galloo. 

61. — Development of the French Novel I. Two hours credit. First 
semester, by appointment. A survey of the novel in the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries. . Galloo. 

62. — Development of the French Novel II. Three hours credit. 



Sociology. 181 

Second semester, by appointment. The novel in the nineteenth century, 
with special reference to the origin and growth of realism and naturalism. 

Galloo. 

63. — The French Drama. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. A study of the development of the drama in France from 
its origin to the close of the nineteenth century. Lectures, recitations, 
and written reports. Galloo. 

64. — Old French. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. An introduction to French philology. Reading of the Extraits de 
la Chanson de Roland (Gaston Paris), with special attention to the 
phonetic changes and the inflections. Galloo. 

65. — Old French. Two hours credit. Second semester, by appoint- 
ment. A continuation of course 63. Chrestomathie de l'ancien francais 
(Constans). Galloo. 

ITALIAN. 

Students are advised to take, as preparation, courses 1 and 2 or 51 
and 52 in French. 

21. — Elementary Italian I. Three hours credit. First semester, by 
appointment. Grammar, and easy reading. Cram. 

22. — Elementary Italian II. Continuation of course 21. Three 
hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. Grammar, composition, 
and reading of works of Manzoni, Edmondo de Amicis and other modern 
writers. Cram. 

23. — Italian Reading and Grammar. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester by appointment. Grammatical exercises accompanying the read- 
ing and translating of works of Goldoni, Fogazzaro, Carducci, Pascoli. 
Prerequisite, course 22. Cram. 

24. — Writers of Cinquecento. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
by appointment. Reading of selections from Machiavelli, Cellini, Ariosto, 
Tasso, etc. D'Ancona and Bacci's Manuale della letteratura italiana, 
vols. I, II, and III. Prerequisite, course 23. Cram. 

80. — Dante. Three hours credit. First semester, by appointment. 
The Divina Commedia; its relation to the age, and its importance in the 
history of the Italian language and literature. Prerequisite, course 23. 

Cram. 
RUSSIAN. 

95. — Russian Language I. Three hours credit. First semester. 
96. — Russian Language II. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

Professor: Blackmar (Head of Department.) 
Associate Professors . Hekleberg, Elmer. 
Instructor : Bodenhafer. 
Lecturer : Sippy. 

Equipment. Instruction in the department of sociology is conducted 
chiefly by lectures, reading, recitation, and investigation, aided in the 
elementary courses by textbooks. The University library is well equipped 
for the study of sociology. All of the principal magazines treating of the 
work of this department are on file in the reading room for the use of the 
students. In addition there are charts, maps, and outlines. In the 
natural history museum is a valuable collection of specimens for the 
study of anthropology and ethnology. A limited amount of investigation 
of social a nd rac ial conditions is being carried on. 

Advice as to Courses. Elements of sociology as found in course 1 or 
50 or their equivalent is a prerequisite to further work in the department. 
At the beginning of the Junior year students desiring to major in soci- 



182 The College. 

ology should consult with an instructor in the department in regard to 
choice of courses for the required major work. 

The development of professional social work in this country opens up 
an attractive field for university men and women. The courses offered 
by this department are, therefore, of definite interest to those preparing 
to become workers in social settlements, secretaries of private charities, 
welfare secretaries in industries, staff sociologists in our state charitable 
and penal institutions, city superintendents of public welfare, recreation 
directors, and playground and social center workers. Experience has 
demonstrated that the study of sociology is a valuable preparation for 
teaching. 

Suggested courses for training for social service (elements of sociology 
a prerequisite) : 

I. Training for social service in urban communities. 5.9, Ethnology; 
61, Contemporary Society; 51, Applied Sociology; 52, Social Pathology; 

53, Remedial and Corrective Agencies; 64, Municipal Sociology; 55, 
Psychological Sociology; 63, Social Surveys; 70, Community Organiza- 
tion; 107, Criminology (graduate); Immigration and Race Problems. 
Students should elect additional courses in economics and political science. 

II. Training for social service in rural communities. 2, Rural Soci- 
ology; 70, Community Organization; 51, Applied Sociology; 56, The 
Family; 55, Psychological Sociology. Students should elect certain 
courses in economics and physical education. 

III. Training for social service in institutions. 58, Anthropology; 52, 
Soial Pathology; 53, Remedial and Corrective Agencies; 51, Applied 
Sociology; Vital Statistics; 107, Criminology (graduate); 103, Institu- 
tional and Social Service. 

IV. Training in preparation for the ministry, laiv, and medicine. 58, 
Anthropology; 59, Ethnology; 56, The Family; 61, Contemporary Society; 

54, Public Opinion; 55, Psychological Sociology; 57, Socialism; Vital 
Statistics; 62, Social Surveys. 

V. Training in preparation for teaching. 61, Contemporary Society; 
56, The Family; 52, Social Pathology; 53, Remedial and Corrective 
Agencies; 51, Applied Sociology; 55, Psychological Sociology; 54, Public 
Opinion; 63, Social Surveys; 70, Community Organization; Eugenics. 

1. — Elements of Sociology. Three hours credit. Both semesters, at 
8:30 and 1:30. A general course in the foundations and principles of 
sociology, including a study of the origin, evolution, structure, organiza- 
tion and activities of society. The course is especally arranged for 
those who have not previously studied sociology. Prerequisite to all 
courses except 50. Elmer and Bodenhafer. 

2. — Rural Sociology- Two hours credit. Second semester, at 8:30. 
A study of social conditions in rural districts and small towns. The 
agencies for social and economic betterment. The church and the school- 
house as social centers. Political, social, and economic organizations. 

Elmer. 

50. — Elements of Sociology. Two hours credit. Both semesters, at 
8:30. The same as course 1, except more difficult and greater emphasis 
on pure sociology and social theory. Either 50 or 1 prerequisite to other 
courses. Elmer. 

51. — Principles of Applied Sociology. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 9:30. An application of the theories' and principles studied 
in courses 1 and 50 to social activities. A special study of social energy 
and social waste, with methods of conservation of social energy and 
elimination of social waste. Elmer. 

52. — Social Pathology. Two hours credit. First semester, at 11 :30. 
A general study of poverty, pauperism, unemployment, epilepsy, insanity, 
degeneracy, etc., and their causes, prevention, and cure. Conditions of 



Sociology. 183 

the slums and rural population, housing of the poor, social maladjust- 
ment, occupational diseases, etc. Bodenhafer. 

53. — Remedial and Corrective Agencies. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11:30. Administration of charitable and correctional affairs; 
management of jails, reformatories, penitentiaries, and institutions for 
defectives and dependents; housing of the poor. Each student is re- 
quired to visit at least two social institutions and report on same. 

Bodenhafer. 

54. — Public Opinion. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 2:30. 
A study of the origin and development of social control; public opinion 
and democracy; leadership and authority; phenomena of the public or 
ethnic mind; the relations of the individual and the group. Helleberg. 

55. — Psychological Sociology. Five hours credit. First semester, at 
1:30. A study of the social self and the process of its development, to- 
gether with applications to a variety of social problems, in order to 
establish a viewpoint and method for sociology and all the social sciences. 

Helleberg. 

56. — The Family. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 2:30. The 
origin and growth of the family. The true family a biological, psycho- 
logical and moral unity. Psychology of family life. Helleberg. 

57. — Socialism. Two hours credit. First semester, at 2:30. The 
development of modern socialistic theories, including a study of French 
and German socialism. The development of the socialistic movement. 

Helleberg. 

58. — General Anthropology. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
8:30. The natural history of man. The probable origin and antiquity of 
man. Comparison with anthropoid apes. Man's physical, social, and 
mental characteristics. Evidences of Tertiary man. The beginnings of 
aft and industry. The origin and development of languages. 

Blackmar. 

59. — Ethnology. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 8:30. Origin 
of races and ethnic groups. Racial differentiation and development. 
Characteristics of ethnic society. The conflict and survival of races. 
Their geographical distribution. Influence of geographical and physical 
environment. Comparison of natural and civilized races. Blackmar. 

61. — Contemporary Society in the United States. Three hours 
credit. First semester, at 2:30. A general survey of the natural environ- 
ment, population and its distribution, industrial and social grouping, and 
is designed through the study of current concrete social problems as a 
means of correlating the various sciences. Helleberg. 

62. — Development of Social Theory. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 1 :30. A rapid historical survey of social philosophy from Plato 
to Comte, followed by a more detailed examination of current sociological 
theories. Primarily a graduate course, but open to Seniors by permission 
of the instructor. Helleberg. 

63. — Social Surveys. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9:30. 
The history of the social survey. The social survey as a method of social 
investigation and of social statistics. This course is designed not only 
to present the literature of surveys, but to give the student the principles 
and practice of social surveys. Elmer. 

64. — Municipal Sociology. Two hours credit. First semester, at 
9:30. A study of the population, conditions of life, and social problems 
in the modern city with special reference to American municipalities. 
This course is a special study of city problems for students preparing for 
social work. Elmer. 

65. — Immigration and Race Problems in the United States, 
Three hours credit. First semester, at 8:30. The underlying social 
causes of population movement; social factors in the distribution of 



184 The College. 

immigrant population; assimilation; social problems involved in the con- 
tact of races and peoples; effect upon social institutions; methods of 
readjustment and control. Elmer. 

66.— Vital Statistics. One hour credit. Second semester, Wednes- 
day, at 10:30. Vital Statistics, social sanitation, movement of popula- 
tion in registration areas, mortality statistics, disease, etc. Sippy. 

67. — Eugenics. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 8:30. A 
study of the agencies under social control that may improve or impair 
racial qualities, either mentally, morally, or physically. Organic evolu- 
tion, genetics, or heredity is a prerequisite for this course. Zoology 4, 
64, or 72 would be sufficient. Blackmar. 

69.— Criminology. Two hours credit. First semester, 1:30. Causes 
of crime. Development of methods in treatment of criminals. Penal 
institutions. Preventive measures. Bodenhafer. 

70. — Community Organization. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9:30. A study of the problems involved in the organization of social 
agencies, with a critical study of methods followed in organizing social 
centers, civic leagues, federated and union churches, and similar organ- 
izations. This course is especially designed for teachers, ministers, and 
others expecting to direct the activities of their respective communities. 
Prerequisite, social surveys. Elmer. 

ZOOLOGY. 

Professor: Allen (Head of Department). 
Associate Professor : Batjmgartner. 
Assistant Professors: Johnson, Nowlin, Robertson. 
Preparator and Demonstrator : Douthitt. 

The department is in possession of ample facilities in the way of appa- 
ratus and laboratory material. There are representative types of marine 
animals from the Pacific and the Atlantic coasts, as well as from Ber- 
muda and Jamaica. Historical, cytological and embryological material 
of great variety has been provided. Microscopes, microtomes, and other 
apparatus for even the most advanced work are at hand. 

Advice Concerning Choice of Courses. Course 1 is designed as an 
introduction to the subject, and, so far as possible, gives a general survey 
of the animal kingdom. The character of the work is such as to lay 
particular stress upon, training in the independent observation and 
correlation of facts. It is, therefore, a course which may be taken by 
those who wish merely to gain a general idea of zoology and also by those 
who wish to become acquainted with the methods of scientific work. As an 
elementary course it forms a basis for any advanced work, and is re- 
quired for entrance into other courses, except 52, 61, and 64. 

Major Requirements. In the work counting toward a major students 
must complete ten hours chosen from among the following courses: 53, 
54, 55, 56, and 71. 

1. — Elementary Zoology. Five hours credit. First semester, labora- 
tory, M. W. F., 8:30 to 10:30, 10:30 to 12:30, or 1:30 to 3:30; recitations 
and lectures, Tu. Th., 11:30, or 2:30. Second semester, laboratory, 8:30 
to 10:30, or 10:30 to 12:30; recitations and lectures, 9:30 or 11:30. A 
study of biological principles as illustrated in the animal kingdom as a 
whole. The laboratory work is designed to give training in methods of 
scientific observation and interpretation. Fee, $2.50. 

2. — Aquatic Zoology. Two hours credit. Second semester. Tu. Th., 
10:30 to 12:30. Field and laboratory course dealing with physiology, 
structure, and life cycles of protozoa, worms, and crustaceans. Attention 
will be given to their relation to water supply, sewage disposal, and other 
problems of sanitation. Prerequisite, zoology 1 or equivalent. Fee, $1.50. 

Nowlin. 



Zoology. 185 

3. — Comparative Anatomy. Five hours credit. First semester, a sec- 
tion primarily for deficient medical students. Second semester, for pre- 
medical and general students. Laboratory, M. W., 1:30 to 4:30, or Tu. 
Th. F., 1:30 to 3:30; lectures Tu. Th., at 3. A course dealing with the 
structure and relations of the vertebrates. It consists of lectures, as- 
signed readings, and a laboratory study of types. This course is designed 
for premedical students, those intending to teach, and those desiring a 
general cultural course. Prerequisite, course 1 or its equivalent. Fee, 
$3.50. Baumgartner. 

4. — Ornithology. Three hours credit. Second semester, M. W. F. 
8:30, and by appointment. Field trips by appointment. A study of the 
birds of this vicinity. A list of the different species will be made by the 
students, and special attention will be given to living birds, notes being 
taken as to date of appearance, nesting habits, song, etc. The collections 
in the museum will be used. Fee, $1.50. Johnson. 

5. — Heredity and Animal Breeding. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, Tu. Th., 1:30 to 12:30. An introduction to the laws of heredity 
and variation in animals and man. The cellular basis; Mendel's law, the 
origin of new races; the influence of environment. Lectures, recitations, 
laboratory work, dealing with problems relating to variation, heredity. 
Part of the time is spent in study of the breeds of domestic animals and 
the principles underlying their improvement. Prerequisite, course 1 or 
equivalent. Fee, $1. Robertson. 

6. — Evolution of Behavior. Three hours credit. First semester, 
M. W., 10 :30 to 12 :30 ; Friday, 10 :30 to 11 :30. A course dealing with the 
evolution of behavior in relation to sense organs and the nervous system. 
Lectures, dissection, and experimentation. Nowlin. 

. 50. — Elementary Zoology. Five hours credit. First semester, 8:30 
to 10:30. A study of biological principles as illustrated in the animal 
kingdom as a whole. The laboratory work is designed to give training 
in methods of scientific observation and interpretation. This course is a 
duplication of course 1, and is not open to those who have taken the latter. 
Fee, $2.50. Allen. 

52. — Mammals. Two hours credit. Second semester, M. W., 8:30 to 
10:30. This course will be a study of local fauna together with the prep- 
arations in the museum. Fee, 1.50. Johnson. 

53. — Animal Histology. Five hours credit. First semester, 1:30 to 
3:30. The methopls of preparation and a careful study of normal tissues 
constitute this course. Lectures, assigned readings, and laboratory work. 
Prerequisites, courses 1 and 3, or equivalents. Fee, $3.50. 

Baumgartner. 

54. — Cytology. Five hours credit. First semester, 8:30 to 10:30. 
General structure and functions of the cell in development and inherit- 
ance. Cell division; cell differentiation; formation of germ cells; sex de- 
termination; fertilization; parthenogenesis, etc., with emphasis on 
chromosomes and other elements concerned in heredity. Training in 
tissue culture methods and cytological technique. Prerequisite, 10 hours 
of zoology or equivalent. Fee, $3.50. Robertson. 

55. — Embryology — Descriptive and Experimental. Five hours 
credit. Second semester, 10:30 to 12:30. A study of the normal develop- 
ment of the frog, the chick, and the pig, together with the underlying 
principles of embryonic development. Opportunity will be given for 
properly qualified students to do original research work. Prerequisite, 
10 hours of zoology or equivalent. Fee, $3.50. Allen. 

56. — Vertebrate Paleontology. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
10:30 to 12:30. A course dealing with the anatomical characters which 
have marked the evolutional stages in the geological history of verte- 
brates. Lectures, recitations, assigned readings, and laboratory work. 
Abundant material is at hand for the illustration of the course. Pre- 



186 The College. 

requisite, 10 hours of zoology. Geology 1 is recommended as further 
preparatory work. Fee, $3.50. Allen. 

57. — Parasitology. Three hours credit. First semester. Lectures, 
sections A and B, Tu. Th., 10:30. Laboratory, section A, M., 2 to 4; sec- 
tion B, Fri., 2 to 4. Designed to meet the needs of those who study medi- 
cine or public-health problems, and of those interested in agriculture. 
The class will be divided upon this basis into two sections for the con- 
sideration of the more specialized phases of the work. Prerequisite, 
course 1 or equivalent. Fee, $2. Allen, Nowlin. 

60. — Animal Biology. Three hours credit. First semester, at 9:30. 
This course is designed for those students who wish to study the general 
theories of animal biology beyond the point reached in the elementary 
course. Lectures, recitations, discussions, and assigned readings. Pre- 
requisite, zoology 1 or equivalent in other biological sciences. Allen. 

61. — Vertebrates of the Past. Two hours credit. First semester, 
9:30. A consideration of the various types of extinct animals, with a 
discussion of the general processes of evolution through which the pres- 
ent forms of animal life have passed. This will be illustrated by the 
collections in the museum. Prerequisite, zoology 1 or equivalent. 

Johnson. 

64. — Heredity in Relation to Eugenics. Three hours credit. First 
semester, 10:30 to 12:30. Lectures, assigned readings, and conferences. 
An exposition of the biological laws underlying eugenics. The latter 
half of the term is spent in a study of the human traits and their in- 
heritance through family pedigrees. For students of sociology, medicine, 
education, etc. Not open to those who have taken course 5. Prerequisite, 
five hours of biological science. Fee, $1. Robertson. 

71. — Parasitic Protozoology. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
8:30 to 10:30. Laboratory and lecture course, with instruction in 
methods of technique and the parasitic protozoa. Special emphasis is 
placed upon those forms producing human diseases. Prerequisite, ten 
hours of zoology or equivalent. Fee, $3.50. Nowlin. 

72. — Genetics. Five hours credit. Second semester, 8:30 and by ap- 
pointment. Lectures, readings and laboratory work. A careful study 
of variation, inheritance of acquired characters, mutation, Mendelism, 
sex-linked inheritance and the inheritance of secondary sexual charac- 
ters, problems of evolution in the light of experimental breeding. At- 
tention is given to the varieties of domesticated animals. Prerequisite, 
ten hours of zoology, including zoology 5 or 64, or their equivalents. 
Fee, $3.50. Robertson. 

73. — Zoological Problems. Three or five hours credit. Both semes- 
ters, by appointment. This course is designed to provide for the continu- 
ation of work of an essentially original character begun in some preceding 
course. It is to be taken under the direction of the teacher under whom 
the work was begun. Fee, $2.50 or $3.50. The staff. 



SECTION IV. 

School of Engineering, 

Including Mining and Metallurgy. 

(187) 



FACULTY, 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., Chanellor of the University, and President of the 
Faculties. 

Perley F. Walker, 1 M. M. E., Dean of the School of Engineering, and 
Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

George C. Shaad, E. E., Acting Dean of the School of Engineering and 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Erasmus Haworth, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

William A. Griffith, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

James Naismith, 2 M. D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Frederick E. Kester, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Hamilton P. Cady, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Henry W. Humble, A. M., Professor of Law. 

Herbert A. Rice, C. E., Professor of Mechanics and Structural Engi- 
neering. 

Goldwin Goldsmith, Ph. B., Professor of Architecture. 

Frank B. Dains, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Clement C. Williams, C. E., Professor of Railway Engineering. 

John N. Van der Vries, 2 Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles H. Ashton, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Arthur C. Terrill, E. M., Professor of Mining and Ore Dressing. 

William A. Whitaker, 3 A. M., Professor of Metallurgy. 

Frederick H. Sibley, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

George J. Hood, B. S., Professor of Engineering Drawing. 

Martin E. Rice, M. S., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Charles A. Haskins, 1 B. S., Associate Professor of Sanitary Engineering. 

Frederick N. Raymond, A. M., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

Herman C. Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

William C. McNown, B. S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Alfred H. Sluss, B. S. in M. E., Associate Professor of Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

B. L. Wolfe, Associate Professor of Mining. 

F. Ellis Johnson, E. E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Edwin F. Stimpson, B. S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Frank E. Jones, 1 Assistant Professor of Pattern Making and Founding. 

Clifford C. Young, 2 M. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Herbert E. Jordan, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Theodore T. Smith, 2 Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Paul V. Faragher,5 Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

John D. Garver,* B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



* Died, February, 1919. 

1. On leave for military service. 

2. On leave for war work. 

3. Absent on leave. 
5. Absent on leave. 



(189) 



190 Faculty. 

Frank L. Brown, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanics. 

Walter S. Long, A. M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Harry A. Roberts, 1 B. S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Jacob O. Jones, M. C. E., Assistant Professor of Hydraulics. 

Frederick W. Bruckmiller, 3 A. B., Assistant Professor Chemistry. 

John J. Wheeler, A. B., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Solomon Leftschetz, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Richard L. Grider. E. M., Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

Winthrop P. Haynes, 1 Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Geology, Miner- 
alogy, and Petrology. 

May Gardner, 2 A. B., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Oscar Rocklund, Instructor in Machine Construction, and Superintend- 
ent of Fowler Shops. 

H. A. Forney, Instructor in Forging. 

A. C. Rutherford, Instructor in Machine Construction. 

A. R. Bailey, Instructor in Machine Construction. 

Willard Austin Wattles, 1 A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 

Clarence Estes, B S., in Chem. Eng., Assistant Professor in Chemistry. 

Laurens E. Whittemore, 2 A. M., Instructor in Physics. 

Clifford W. Seibel, 2 B. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

La Force Bailey, A. M., Instructor in Architectural Engineering. 

Chas. A. Keener, Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

R. Leffert, Assistant Instructor in Machine Construction. 

S. C. Messenheimer, Assistant Instructor in Machine Construction. 

LECTURERS. 

J. A. L. Waddell, D. Sc, LL. D., Consulting Engineer, Kansas City, 

Mo., Lecturer on Economics of Engineering. 
John S. Worley, B. S., M. S., Member of Valuation Committee, Interstate 

Commerce Commission. Lecturer on Transportation. 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

P. F. Walker. G. Goldsmith. 

C. H. Ashton, Secretary. A. C. Terrill. 

G. C. Shaad. M. E. Rice. 

H. A. Rice. F. B. Dains. 

C. C. Williams. 
G. J. Hood, Chief Adviser of Freshmen. 

1. On leave for military service. 

2. Absent for war work. 

3. Absent on leave. 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, 



DEPARTMENTS. 

Civil Engineering. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineering. 

Mining Engineering, School of Mines. 

Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering. 

Architectural Engineering. 

Industrial Engineering. 

ORGANIZATION AND PURPOSE. 

The School of Engineering was organized as a distinct school of the 
University in 1891. Prior to that time, for eighteen years, courses in 
engineering had been given under the collegiate department, mainly in 
the civil and electrical branches. 

Technical work is given in eight departments, entirely within the con- 
trol of the School. Departments of the College of Liberal Arts give 
courses in science, mathematics, languages, and economics for engineer- 
ing students. The curriculum includes definitely scheduled work leading 
to degrees in the main branches of engineering — civil, electrical, mechan- 
ical, mining, chemical and metallurgical, and architectural — with options 
under the civil in railway, structural, and sanitary engineering, and 
under mining in coal mining, ore dressing, and geology. Provision is 
made also for those who desire a training for business and administra- 
te ve work based upon engineering. 

The requirements for graduation emphasize the fact that a thorough 
grounding in the fundamental sciences, mathematics, and language is es- 
sential to successful engineering practice. This idea is then extended by 
introducing a moderate amount of specialized work in the Junior and 
Senior years, but the aim throughout is to develop the principles under- 
lying technical engineering work rather than to make direct applications. 
It will be observed, moreover, that the requirements for graduation call 
for about twenty credit hours more than are required for a degree in 
pure science of arts, and this excess is in the nature of practice work 
in shop, field, and drawing room. By these three methods the purpose 
of the School is shown, namely, to give the basis of a liberal education 
v/hile providing for training in specialized professions, and to give suf- 
ficient practice work and familiarity with operating methods to enable 
the graduate to make himself useful to employers while he is gaining the 
broader experience necessary to a successful engineering career. 

FIVE-YEAR COURSES. 

In order to give greater emphasis to the value of general educational 
training for engineers, provision has been made for students so desiring 
to spend one year in the College of Arts and Sciences, and then to enter 
the School of Engineering for four years of study, making up a total of 
five years in the University. The conditions under which this may be 
done, and statements as to the degree conferred on completion of the 
work, are given in the following pages. The amount of technical work 
required is practically the same as in the regular four-year courses, but 
opportunities are offered for selecting a wider range of studies, and so 

(191) 



192 School of Engineering. 

providing for a broader education. Young men just graduating from 
high school are strongly urged to adopt this plan of procedure. 

The leading characteristics of the several branches are noted in the 
following outlines : 

Civil Engineering. 

In the professional work emphasis is laid on surveying and field 
methods; on mechanics and the application to the designing of steel and 
concrete structures; on railway location and construction; on hydraulics, 
and the application to irrigation, canal, and power work; and on water 
supply and other' municipal problems, including pavement and highway 
construction. Particular emphasis is given to the training of men for the 
three important branches: namely, railway, structural, and sanitary en- 
gineering. For each of these a special schedule for the work of the 
Senior year will be found in the following pages. 

Electrical Engineering. 

The specialized studies under this heading follow the fundamental 
work in physics and machine elements. They give emphasis to the 
methods of design, construction, and operation of electrical equipment of 
all kinds as employed for the production, distribution, and application of 
electrical energy, and in telephone service. Much emphasis is laid on the 
fundamental principles of mechanics and electricity, and on laboratory 
practice in handling standard apparatus. Original investigation is en- 
couraged in every way possible. 

Mechanical Engineering. 

In the professional work especial emphasis is placed on machine con- 
struction and design, the properties of materials, power generation with 
heat engines, and general manufacturing methods. Options in the Senior 
year permit specialization to a limited degree, so that the student may 
give his attention to that line in which he develops the greatest interest. 
The aim is to give the training which will permit the graduate to perform 
successfully the work required of the technical designer and adminis- 
trator in manufacturing industries. 

Mining Engineering — School of Mines. 

The mining department, in conjunction with the associated depart- 
ments of chemistry, including metallurgy and geology, with the general 
work of the Engineering School as a whole, performs all the functions 
of a School of Mines. 

The courses include work in many of the departments of the Univer- 
sity. Emphasis is laid on chemistry, geology, mineralogy, metallurgy, 
physics, mechanics, ore dressing, surveying, design, mining operation, 
and management. Under the heading, "Curriculum," options for the 
five important branches of the mining industry: namely, mining geology, 
metal mining, coal mining, ore dressing, and metalurgy, given under 
chemical engineering, are arranged to permit the student to specialize 
in the work for which he has a preference and for which he is best 
fitted. The aim is to encourage original investigation, to prepare men 
to undertake the development of mineral properties, to design and con- 
struct mine plants and ore-dressing mills and works, to evaluate min- 
ing property, to properly report propositions submitted for investment, to 
supervise mining operations, and to make rapid profitable advancement 
in the professional work required by the large mining corporations. 



Degrees Granted. 193 

Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering. 

In this branch opportunity is given for specialization in technical 
chemistry, with the aim to combine the ability to perform chemical work 
with training in the fundamentals of engineering. It is expected that 
students are fitting themselves for positions as chemists and superin- 
tendents of manufacturing plants where work is based on chemical 
science. These include many industries, such as those involving iron and 
steel, smelting, refining, bleaching and dying processes, and the manu- 
facture of many specialized products. 

Architectural Engineering. 

Much is included in this branch which involves the artistic as well as 
the utilitarian in building design and construction. It is recognized that 
architecture is essentially a fine art, but that this should be combined 
with the scientific and technical training which will enable the graduate 
to deal with the engineering side of construction work. The professional 
work given includes thorough instruction in the history and theory of 
architecture and in the principles of design. It is the aim to give such 
training as will enable the graduate to render efficient service while he is 
supplementing his school training by experience gained in office practice. 

Engineering and Administrative Science. 

Arrangements have been perfected whereby the College departments of 
economics, history, and sociology cooperate with the School of Engineer- 
ing in offering work to fit men for positions in the administrative offices 
of manufacturing companies and in the transportation departments of 
railroads. Both the College student and the engineering student may 
profit by the plan. 

The student who has started in engineering may begin to vary the 
regular schedule of studies during his second year, and may, under the 
advice of a committee of the Faculty, arrange to substitute from twenty 
to twenty-five hours of courses in the College department indicated in 
place of the more highly specialized engineering work. The student is 
trained, therefore, in all the fundamentals of engineering, and should 
be well fitted to take positions in offices where the work depends largely 
upon technical phases of the industry in question. A more detailed 
statement of the work will be found in the following pages under the 
heading "Curriculum." 

degrees granted. 

All graduates of the School of Engineering are admitted to the degree 
of bachelor of science in engineering or bachelor of science. The first is 
given to those who have completed the work laid out on the regular four- 
year plan, based on entrance from the accredited high schools. The sec- 
ond is given to those who enter the School of Engineering after having 
completed thirty hours of work in the College of Arts and Sciences, and 
to those who complete the work offered in engineering and administrative 
science. 

All graduates of the School of Engineering may enter, the Graduate 
School of the University and become candidates for the degree of Master 
of Science under the regulations there in force. 

Graduates in engineering from this school, and those who have re- 
ceived the master's degree for advanced study in engineering under the 
Graduate School, are eligible to the professional degrees of Civil Engi- 
neer, Electrical Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Engineer of Mines, 
Chemical Engineer, and Architectural Engineer, whichever is appropri- 
ate to the undergraduate work taken. Candidates for these degrees must 

13— K. U.— 5419. 



194 School of Engineering. 

have spent at least three years of actual time in professional practice in 
positions of responsibility, in the design, construction, or operation of 
professional works, and must furnish detailed and satisfactory evidence 
as to the nature and extent of this practice. 

The candidate must submit a thesis, accompanied by detailed explana- 
tions, drawings, specifications, estimates, etc., and embodying the results 
of his own work or observation. If approved, the thesis, with all accom- 
panying materials, becomes the property of the University. 

The thesis for any professional degree must be delivered to the Dean 
of the School of Engineering on or before May 15. 

SCHOLARSHIP STANDING FOR GRADUATION. 

In the General Information Section the system of grading is ex- 
plained, there being four passing grades indicated by the letters A, B, C, 
and D. The last one, D, indicates a bare passing mark. 

In the School Engineering there is a regulation which limits the 
amount of barely passing grade work which will be accepted as credit 
toward a degree. Under this rule a student who has grade D in more 
than twenty-five percent of his total hours will not be recommended for 
graduation unless his case is given special consideration by the school 
faculty. Such special consideration may be given him only in case he 
has secured grades better than D in fifty percent of his hours of credit 
work in mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology, and all of the special- 
ized engineering departments excepting shop work and drawing. 

ADMISSION. 

By act of the state legislature, all graduates of accredited high schools 
in Kansas are admitted to the Freshman class without examination. 

Graduates of other preparatory schools will be admitted on such con- 
ditions as the Faculty may impose. 

For the guidance of prospective students who desire to prepare them- 
selves without graduating from accredited high schools an outline of pre- 
paratory studies which has been followed for many years is given below. 
A total of fifteen units must be offered for admission. 

ENGLISH. — Rhetoric and English literature, 3 or 4 units. Three units required. 

MATHEMATICS. — Elementary algebra, IVz units; plane geometry, 1 unit; solid 
geometry, % unit ; plane trigonometry, Vz unit ; advanced algebra, % unit. Three units 
required to prepare for the regular engineering courses. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES. — Latin, 1, 2, 3, or 4 units; Greek, 1, 2, 3, or 4 units; Ger- 
man, 1, 2, 3, or 4 units; French, 1, 2, 3, or 4 units; Spanish, 1 or 2 units. Two units at 
entrance and ten hours of German, French, or Spanish in the University complete the 
requirements for graduation. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES. — Physical Geography, 1 or % unit; physics, 1 unit; chemis- 
try, 1 unit. One unit required. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. — Botany, 1 unit; zoology, 1 unit; physiology, 1 or ^ 
unit ; biographical science, 1 unit. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. — Greek and Roman history, 1 unit; mediasval 
and modern history, 1 unit; English history, 1 unit; American history, 1 unit; economics, 
1 or Y2 unit; civics, V2 unit. Three units recommended. 

MANUAL TRAINING. — Woodwork, forging, and machine tool work, 2 units; free- 
band or mechanical drawing, 1 unit. 

MISCELLANEOUS. — Stenography, V 2 unit; bqokkeeping, V2 unit; commercial law, 
1/2 unit; commercial geography, x /z unit; agriculture, V2 or 1 unit; psychology, V2 unit; 
advanced arithmetic if taken after one year of algebra, x k unit. Not more than two units 
are allowed. 

Entrance Examination. 

Candidates for admission who are not graduates of accredited Kansas 
high schools may offer themselves for examination in subects usually em- 
braced in the high-school curriculum. Whenever a candidate has thus 
secured credit for the equivalent of the work included in the curriculum 
of the accredited high school he will be admitted to the Freshman class. 



Admission. 195 

A schedule of these examinations will be found on page 54 of the 
General Information Section of the Catalog. 

Inadequate Preparation. 

When a student by his current work shows insufficient preparation for 
any course, he may be required to make good such deficiency in any man- 
ner prescribed by his instructor and approved by the Dean of the School. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

Credit for work of collegiate or professional standing is granted only 
on recommendation of the Advanced Standing Committee. For regula- 
tions governing the granting of such credit, see "Admission to Advanced 
Standing," Section I, page 52. 

Foreign Language Required for Graduation. 

The total amount of work in foreign language which is required for 
graduation, both high-school credits and courses taken after entering the 
University being considered together, must be equivalent to twenty hours 
in University courses, of which at least ten hours shall be in one modern 
foreign language, excepting that a student entering without any foreign 
language need take only fifteen hours in the University, provided the en- 
tire time is given to a single foreign language. Each unit of entrance 
credit counts as five hours. 

The curriculum (see page 199) calls for ten hours of modern foreign 
language in the Freshman year. In any case where a student is able 
to satisfy the foreign language requirements by taking a lesser number 
of hours than ten, he may substitute other University work for the num- 
ber of hours remaining. 

Mathematics Required for Graduation. 

The total amount of work in mathematics which is required for gradu- 
ation, both high-school credits and courses taken after entering being 
considered together, must be equivalent to thirty-two hours in University 
courses for civil-, electrical-, mechanical-, and architectural-engineering 
students, and twenty-nine hours for mining-, and chemical-engineeering 
students. Each unit of entrance credit counts as five hours. Students 
who present entrance credits amounting to more than fifteen hours, how- 
ever, must complete the courses in calculus as prescribed in the curricula 
for the several branches. 

Special Students. 

Opportunity is given in the School of Engineering for the admission of 
persons of mature years who desire to pursue some special lines of work, 
without following any prescribed course of study or becoming candidates 
for a degree. 

The admission of such special students is directly under the control of 
the Dean of the School of Engineering, whose certificate of acceptance 
must be presented to the Registrar before registration. Applicants for 
admission as special students must present satisfactory evidence of 
proper preparation for the courses desired, and must also meet other 
requirements as fixed by the Faculty. 

Special students are subject to the same regulations as are regular 
students with regard to the quality of work performed and attendance 
at recitations and examinations, but not as to number of courses to be 
pursued. 

If a special student later becomes a candidate for a degree, the credits 
he has received while enrolled as a special student will not be allowed 
to count towards this degree, except by the approval of the Faculty. In 



196 School of Engineering. 

no case may a student be granted a degree until he has been enrolled for 
one year as a regular student. 

Any one regularly enrolled in another school of the University may 
be admitted as a special student to engineering classes, but all applica- 
tions for such enrollment must be accompanied by the recommendation 
of the dean of the school concerned. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission having certificates from accredited 
schools and all students of the University intending to pursue their 
studies during the ensuing year should present themselves for registra- 
tion at the University on September 15, 16, or 17, 1919. 

Registration at a later date will be permitted only on the payment 
of a fee of one dollar. 

ENROLLMENT. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar and fees 
have been paid, students should apply to the Dean for enrollment in their 
classes. Enrollment the first semester occurs September 16 and 17, 1919, 
and on the first day of the second semester. 

Enrollment at a later date will be permitted only on the payment of 
a fee of one dollar. 

Enrollment Regulations. 

The amount of work to be carried by students is expected to con- 
form to the lists printed in the curriculum on the following pages. The 
number of hours there indicated may not be exceeded unless by express 
permission of the Dean. Students who have shown inability to carry the 
full schedule, or who plan to devote time to remunerative work outside 
of school, are frequently obliged to restrict the number of hours carried 
to fifteen or even less. 

Students are assigned to groups, each group being in charge of a 
member of the Faculty who acts as adviser at enrollment and during 
the year. Students above the Freshman class are assigned to groups 
according to departments in which they are specializing. Advisers are 
expected to retain oversight over their charges, and reports on the cur- 
rent work of students are made to them at monthly intervals. 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Incidental fee per school year, for residents of the state 10 . 00 

for nonresidents 20.00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5 . 00 

Cost of Materials. 

In all laboratory and shop courses the student is charged for the ma- 
terials and supplies he consumes in his work. These charges are payable 
in advance at the office of the University Registrar by the purchase of a 
book of coupons receivable for materials in any course, or by the pay- 
ment of a fixed amount for a course in which the material cannot be 
issued to each student individually. A schedule of these fixed fees is 
posted in Marvin Hall and in the office of the University Registrar. In 
those courses where a large amount of material is used by the student 
and paid for with coupons, the total cost for any one course may reach or 
occasionally exceed $10. 

Those students taking summer field work will be charged the actual 
cost of living and incidental expenses. 



Technical Societies. 197 

Cost of Drawing Instruments. 

The ability to make standard office drawings in connection with the 
designing of machines and structures of all kinds is a necessary part of 
an engineer's attainments. The drawing practice begins in the Fresh- 
man year, and for all excepting chemical engineering students continues 
during the three years following. This fact make necessary for each 
student the ownership of a set of drafting instruments of standard 
quality. In order to make this matter sure, and protect students from 
any who might wish to sell inferior grades, the School prescribes the 
kinds which may be used. Students entering the Engineering School 
should plan to expend from $18 to $20 for the regulation sets, together 
with other necessary equipment for the drawing classes. 

Expense for Inspection Trips. 

Students should make provision for expenses of about $40 in the 
Junior or Senior year, or both, for inspection trips to engineering works. 
(See "Inspection Trips" at the end of "Description of Courses.") 

VOCATIONAL COURSES. 

It is planned to offer from time to time short-term intensive courses 
in many of the standard trades and vocations. Special announcements are 
issued covering Such courses. 

ENGINEERING EXTENSION WORK. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES. 

Through the University Extension Division the School of Engineering 
offers work by correspondence. By this method it is possible for a stu- 
dent to secure instruction in many of the general courses required for 
the degree in engineering and in a few of the technical courses. 

In cases where a group of six or more persons may be formed, ar- 
rangements have been made whereby the Extension Division will send an 
instructor at stated intervals to meet the class. By this means many of 
the technical courses are being offered which are not offered directly 
through correspondence. An additional fee is required for work thus 
given. In this manner it is possible for young men to do a large portion 
of the work required for a degree, but the School of Engineering requires 
that at least one year of work shall be done in residence. 

Work is being offered also of a grade below that required for regular 
credit, in what are termed Vocational Courses. By means of these 
courses effort is made to extend the facilities of the University to a large 
group of young men who have not had time or opportunity to fit them- 
selves for regular engineering work. When possible the work is carried 
on in cooperation with the school authorities of cities and towns and with 
industrial organizations which employ boys in considerable numbers. 

For further details, see "University Extension Division." 

TECHNICAL SOCIETIES. 

Tau Beta Pi. Kansas Alpha Chapter of the honorary engineering 
society of Tau Beta Pi was installed in December, 1914. Members are 
from the Senior and Junior classes, chosen under regulations which re- 
quire that all who are elected shall have standing in the upper fourth of 
their class. It is governed entirely by undergraduates. 



198 School of Engineering. 

Departmental Student Societies. 

In each of the six departments in which a complete course of study 
leading to graduation is scheduled there is a well-organized society hold- 
ing regular meetings at weekly or biweekly intervals. At these meetings 
technical addresses are given or topics from the current press discussed. 
The architectural, chemical, and civil engineering societies are local in 
their character. The electrical, mechanical, and mining organizations 
are connected with the respective national engineering societies. More 
detailed information is given in the General Information Secton of the 
Catalog. 



Courses of Study. 199 



CURRICULUM. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering. 



The work required for the degree of bachelor of science in the School of 
Engineering is in large measure prescribed. The following schedules show 
the variations among the several branches. Students are required to enroll 
for the work in the order given, excepting a few of the specialized courses in 
the Junior and Senior years, which do not depend directly on preceding 
courses. 

The work of the Freshman year is very nearly the same for all students, 
so that a choice among the several branches need not be made at the start, 
except in the case of architectural engineering. A slight modification of the 
shop courses in machine construction makes it desirable for those planning 
to take civil and mining engineering to make definite decision at the end of 
the first semester. 

COURSES COMMON TO ALL LINES.J 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Semester, 17 hours credit.* 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Mathematics 2 College Algebra 3 

Mathematics 3 Plane Trigonometry 2 

German, French, or Spanishf (Course as approved) 5 

English IE Rhetoric 1 3 

Engineering Drawing 1 Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing 2 

Engineering Drawing 2, or \ /Machine Drawing, or \2 

Machine Construction 1 and 2 /(Foundry Practice and Pattern Making. . . . J 2 

Engineering 1 Engineering Lectures. 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Mathematics 4 E Analytic Geometry 5 

German, French, or Spanish t (Course as approved) 5 

English 2 E Rhetoric II 2 

Engineering Drawing 3 Descriptive Geometry 3 

Engineering Drawing 2, or 1 [Machine Drawing, or ] 

Machine Construction 1 and 2, or U Foundry, Forge and Machine Shop Prac-[2 

Machine Construction 3 and 5 } { tice as assigned J 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 18H hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 1 Elementary Surveying 3 

Civil Engineering 5 Roads and Pavements 2 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus 1 5 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Geology 2o (or 2) Elementary Geology 3 

Technical Report I J^ 

* The Hour of Credit. — The amount of work required to complete a course is measured in 
"hours." One hour in the School of Engineering represents an amount of work which is esti- 
mated to require three hours per week, throughout a semester, of the time of a student of average 
ability. These three hours may be divided in any ratio between class attendance and outside 
work, most courses being in the ratio of one hour in class to two hours of outside preparation; 
or two hours in class to one hour of outside preparation or report writing; or all three required 
in class with no outside preparation. In the descriptions of courses the number of hours credit 
for each is ftated. 

t The foreign language chosen is carried regularly throughout the year, five hours each semester. 
The selection of the language courses will depend on the amount and kind of language offered at 
entrance. Students offering more than two units at entrance may be allowed to substitute other 
nontechnical courses for the foreign language, provided they complete ten hours in one modern 
language. 

t Excepting Architectural Engineering. For that, see page 208. 



200 School of Engineering. 

Second Semester, 163^ hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit' 

Civil Engineering 4 Railway Surveying 2 

Civil Engineering 2 Higher Surveying 3 

Mathematics 6 E Calculus II . . 3 

Physics 76 General Physics 5 

Mechanical Engineering 5 Engines and Boilers 3 

Techinical Report II y 2 

Summer Work. 
Civil Engineering 3 Field Work, 4 weeks. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Civil Engineeiing 55 Railway Sui veying 4 

Civil Engineering 51 Cartography 2 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

English 59 Advanced Composil ion 3 

Second Semester, 17M hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 57 Railway Location 3 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

Mechanics 53 Graphic Statistics 2 

Mechanics 55 Hydraulics 3 

Mechanics 56 Hydraulic Laboratory 1 

Chemistry 5 E Engineering Chemistry 3 

Technical Report III y 2 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 61 Stresses in Framed Structures 5 

Civil Engineering 64 Masonry 2 

Civil Engineering 65 ■ . Reinforced Concrete 3 

Civil Engineering 70 Water Supplies 3 

Civil Engineering 76 Seminar H 

Optional 3 

Thesis 1 

Technical Report IV H 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 62 Bridge Design 4 

Civil Engineering 71 Sewerage 2 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Mechanics 57 Cement Laboratory 1 

Civil Engineering 66 Reinforced Concrete Design 1 

Optional * 4 

Thesis 2 

One extended inspection trip is required during the Junior or the Senior year. 

Railway Engineering Option. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Semester, 19 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 61 Stresses in Framed Structures 5 

Civil Engineering 64 Masonry 2 

Civil Engineering 65 Reinforced Concrete 3 

Civil Engineering 70 Water Supplies 3 

Civil Engineering 58 Railway Terminals and Signaling 2 

Electrical Engineering 60 Elements of Electrical Engineering 3 

Civil Engineering 76 Seminar J^ 

Technical Report IV X A 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 62 Bridge Design 4 

Civil Engineering 71 Sewerage • 2 

Mechanics 57 Cement Laboratory 1 

Civil Engineering 59 Railway Construction and Maintenance. . . 3 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Civil Engineering 66 Reinforced Concrete Design 1 

Thesis 3 



Courses of Study. 201 

Structural Engineering Option. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 18 l A hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 61 Stresses in Framed Structures 5 

Civil Engineering 64 Masomy 2 

Civil Engineering 65 Reinfoi ced Concrete 3 

Civil Engineering 70 Water Supplies 3 

Mechanics 54 Engineering Materials 2 

Electrical Engineering 60 Elements of Electrical Engineering 3 

Technical Report IV H 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 62 Bridge Design 4 

Civil Engineering 5 Roads and Pavements 2 

Mechanics 57 Cement Laboratory 1 

Civil Engineering 67 Higher Structures 3 

Engineering 67 Industrial Administration 3 

Civil Engineering 66 Reinforced Concrete Design 1 

Thesis 3 

Municipal and Sanitary Option. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 74 Sanitary Science 2 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

Electrical Engineering 60 Electrical Engineering 3 

Second Semester, 183^2 hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 75 Waste and Garbage Disposal 1 

Civil Engineering 5 Roads and Pavements 2 

Civil Engineering 52 City Planning 2 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

Chemistry 3 Qualitative Analysis 4 

Mechanics 55 Hydraulics 3 

Mechanics 56 Hydraulic Laboratory 1 

Technical Report III H 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17.3^ hours credit. 

Civil Engineering 61 Stresses in Framed Structures. . . ., 4 

Civil Engineering 64 Masonry 2 

Civil Engineering 70 Water Supplies 3 

Civil Engineering 65 Reinforced Concrete 3 

Chemistry 54 Water Analysis 5 

Technical Report IV l A 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Civil Engineering 73 Sanitary Design 5 

Civil Engineering 72 Advanced Sanitary Engineering 4 

Mechanics 57 Cement Laboratory 1 

Civil Engineering 66 Reinforced Concrete Design 1 

Thesis 3 

One extended inspection trip is required during the Junior or the Senior year. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 173^ hours credit. 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus I 5 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

Mechanical Engineering 1 Machine Design 1 1 

Machine Construction 3 Forging 1 

Machine Construction 5 , . . . . Bench Work 1 

Technical Report I }/% 



202 School of Engineering. 

Second Semester, 18}^ hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Electrical Engineering 50 Dynamo Machinery 3 

Electrical Engineering 54 Electrical Laboratory 1 A 

Mathematics 6 E Calculus II 3 

Physics 76 General Physics 5 

Chemistry 3 Qualitative Analysis 4 

Machine Construction 6 Machine Tool Work 1 1 

Technical Report II \i 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17 A hours credit. 

Electiical Engineering 51 Theory of Alternating Currents 3 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Physics 52 Theory of Electricity 3 

Physics 56 Electrical Measurements I . ■. \A 

Mechanical Engineering 4 Steam Machinery 2 

Mechanical Engineering 3 Elementary Machine Design 3 

Technical Report III A 

Second Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Electrical Engineering 52 Dynamo Machinery . 4 

Electrical Engineering 55 Electrical Laboratory \A 

Mechanical Engineering 52 Heat Engine Theory 3 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

Physics 56 Electrical Measurements II VA 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 11A hours credit. 

Electrical Engineering 62 Central Stations 2 

Electrical Engineering 56 Advanced Electrical Laboratory \A 

Electrical Engineering 57 Illuminating Engineering IVv 

Mechanical Engineering 65 Power Laboratory 1A 

Chemistry 70 Physical Chemistry I 5 

English 59 Advanced Composition •. 3 

Thesis 1 

Technical Report IV Yz 

Second Semester, 16 hours credit. 

Electrical Engineering 58 Electrical Power Transmission 4 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Electrical Engineering 61 Thesis 3 

Civil Engineering 50 Surveying 3 

Optional 3 

One extended inspection trip is required during the Junior or the Senior year. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 18K hours credit. 

Mechanical Engineering 1 Machine Design I 3 

Mechanical Engineering 6 Steam Engineering 4 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus 1 5 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry , 4 

Machine Construction 3 Forging 1 

Machine Construction 5 Bench Work 1 

Technical Report I A 

Second Semester, 18 A hours credit. 

Mathematics 6 E Calculus II 3 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Chemistry 5 E Engineering Chemistry 3 

Civil Engineering 50 Surveying 3 

Machine Construction 6 Machine Tool Work 1 1 

Economics IE Elementary Economics 3 

Technical Report II A 



Courses of Study. 203 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Semester, 17.M1 hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. . Hours credit. 

Mechanical Engineering 51 Thermodynamics 3 

Mechanical Engineering 2 Mechanism 3 

Physics 76 General Physics 5 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Machine Construction 7 Machine Tool Work II 1 

Technical Reoprt A 

Second Semester, 17 A hours credit. 

Mechanical Engineering 70 Automotive Engineering 3 

Mechanical Engineering 50 Machine Design II 4 

Mechanical Engineering 64 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 1 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

Machine Construction 8 Advanced Machine Shop Practice 1 

Mechanical Engineering 68 Summer Vacation Wo*k. 

Technical Report A 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17 A hours credit. 

Mechanical Engineering 56 Motive Power Machinery 3 

Mechanics 55 Hydraulics 3 

Mechanics 56 Hydraulic Laboratory 1 

Engineering 51 Industrial Engineering II 3 

Electrical Engineering 50 Dynamo Machinery 3 

Electrical Engineering 54 Electrical Laboratory 1A 

Option (see below) 3 

Second Semester, 16 hours credit. 

Mechanical Engineering 66 Heat Engine Laboratory 1A 

Mechanical Engineering 54 Heating, Ventilation and Refrigerating .... 2 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Electrical Engineering 53 Alternating Currents 3 

Electrical Engineering 55 Electrical Laboratory 1 X A 

Option (see below) 5 

Options. 

Mechanical Engineering 58 Gas Engine and Compressor Design 3 

Mechanics 58 Hydraulic Power 3 

Mechanical Engineering 67 Thesis 3 

Mechanical Engineering 57 Steam Engine and Turbine Design 3 

Electrical Engineering 62 Central Stations 3 

Mechanical Engineering 61 Structural Design .' 2 

One extended inspection trip required during the Senior or Junior year. 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 18^ or 193^ hours credit. 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus 1 5 

Geology 2a or 2 Elementary Geology 3 

Geology 26 Historical Geology 1 2 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Chemistry 2 2 

Civil Engineering 1 Elementary Surveying 1 

Field Surveying 2 

Technical Report I A 

Optional: Mechanical Engineering I Machine Design 1 

Second Semester, 17 A hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 50 Mine Surveying 1 

Mining Engineering 1 or 68 Elements of Mining 3 

Geology 31 Mineralogy 1 5 

Chemistry 3 Qualitative Analysis 2 

Qualitative Laboratory 3 

Civil Engineering 2 Higher Surveying 1 

Field Surveying 2 

Technical Report II A 



204 School of Engineering. 

Summer Work. 

Civil Engineering 3 Field Work, 2 weeks. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17}^ hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 54 Metal Mining 2 

Geology 71 .> Economic Geology I 5 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Chemistry 51 Quantitative Analysis 5 

Technical Report III y% 

Second Semester, 18 or 19 hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 52 Mining Law 1 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Physics 76 Physics 4 

Physics Laboratory 1 

Metallurgy 53 Assaying 5 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 11 Y hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 53 Ore Dressing I 1 

Ore Dressing Laboratory 1 

Mining Engineering 56 Mine, Mill and Plant Design 1 

Design Drafting 1 

Mining Engineering 64 Mining Engineering 3 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Testing Laboratory 1 

Metallurgy 93 or 1 [General Metallurgy, or ) 

Mining Engineering 69 or ' {{ Mining Geology or i 2 

Mining Engineering 61 J ( Coal Mining I J 

Economics IE : . . . Elements of Economics 3 

Technical Report IV ]/ 2 

Second Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 55 Mine Hydraulics 2 

Alining Engineering 57 Mine Administration 1 

ttSSaS-v:: ::::::::::::::::)SffiSeli7!::.::t::::::: 

Mining Engineering 59 Mine Examinations and Reports 2 

Mining Engineering 60 Thesis 2 

Mechanical Engineering 4 Steam Engineering 2 

Metallurgy 91 Metallurgy II 3 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 2 

One inspection trip is required during the Sophmore or Junior year, and another in the Senior 
year. 

Note. — In the Freshman year, mining engineers should take, during the first semester: En- 
gineering Drawing 1 and 2, and during the second semester: Mach. C 3 and 5. 

Total hours credit 1U or I US. 

Ore Dressing Engineering Option. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 18J^ hours'credit. 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus 1 5 

Geology 2a (or 2) Elementary Geology 3 

Geology 26 • Historical Geology 1 2 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry \ 5 

Laboratory j 

Mechanical Engineering 1 Machine Drafting 1 

Machine Construction 5 Bench Work 1 

Machine Construction 6 Machine Tool Work 1 

Technical Report I Y 

Second Semester, 18J^ hours credit. 

Geology 4 Field Geology 1 2 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Chemistry 3 Qualative Analysis \5 

Laboratory J 5 

Geology 31 Mineralogy 1 5 

Machine Construction 3 Forging 1 

Technical Report II Yt, 



Courses of Study. 205 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 19 M hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 53 Ore Dressing 1 2 

Chemistry 51 Quantitative Analysis 5 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Physics 76 Physics 5 

Mining Geology 69 Mining Geology 2 

Technical Report III \i 

Second Semester, 11)4 hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 58 Ore Dressing II 4 

Metallurgy 53 Assaying 5 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 , Testing of Materials 1 

Civil Engineering 50 Elementary Surveying \_ 

Field ! 6 

Techincal Repoit IV y 2 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 58 Ore Dressing III 4 

Mining Engineering 56 Mine Plant and Mill Design 1 2 

Mining Engineering 54 Metal Mining 2 

Electrical Engineering 60, or If Elements of Electrical Engineering, qr. . ... L, 

Mining Engineering 64 J \ Mining Engineering j ** 

Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

Second Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Mining Engineering 63 Mine Plant and Mill Design II 3 

Mining Engineering 55 Mining Hydraulics 2 

Mining Engineering 59 Mining Examinations and Reports. 2 

Metallurgy 91 Metallurgy II 3 

Mechanical Engineering 4 Steam Machinery 2 

Engineering 52 \ I Industrial Administration \_ 

Mining Engineering 57. . , J \ Mine Administration \ A 

Thesis 3 

One inspection trip is required during the Sophomore or Junior year, and another in the 
Senior year. 

Total hour credits, 137. 

Note. — In the Freshman year students should take in — ■ 
(a) First Semester: 

Course number. Subject. Hours credit 

Engineering Drawing 1 Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing 2 

Machine Construction 1 Foundry Practice .]] i 

Machine Construction 2 Pattern Making [[[ 1 

(6) Second Semester: 
Engineering Drawing 2 Machine Drawing 2 



Geological Engineering Option. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 18U hours credit. 

Geology 2a (or 2) Elementary Geology 3 

Geology 26 Historical Geology I 2 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus I '.'.'.'. 5 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. ... . . . . . . 3 

Laboratory ' 2 

Civil Engineering 1 Elementary Surveying 1 

Field Surveying 2 

Technical Report I ' 

Second Semester, 18H hours credit. 

Geology 4 Field Geology I 2 

Geology 31 Mineralogy I '/' ' 5 

Chemistry 3 Qualitative Analysis ... . . 2 

Laboratory 3 

Mining Engineering 68 or 1 Principles of Mining 3 

Civil Engineering 2 Higher Surveying . . . . . 1 

Field Surveying ' ' ' 2 

Technical Report II 1 

Civil Engineering 3 .,,,.. Summer Field Work, 2 weeks. 



206 School of Engineering. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Semester, 17 J^ hours credit. 

Geology 51 Geologic and Topographic Maps 2 

Geology 50 Geologic Processes 3 

Geology 62 Invertebrate Paieonotology 1 5 

Geology 81 or \ (Petrology 1 2 

Mining Engineering 69 J\Mining Geology .. . . 2 

Geology 82 Petrography 3 

Mining Engineering 53 Ore Dressing I 1 

Ore Dressing Laboratory '. 1 

Technical ^Report III H 

Second Semester 17 or 18 hours credit. 

Geology 61 Historical Geology II 5 

Physics la General Physics 4 

Physics Laboratory 1 

Mining Engineering 52 Mining Law 1 

Mining Engineering 58 Ore Dressing II 2 

Ore Dressing Laboratory 2 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 15K hours credit. 

Geology 71 Economic Geology I 5 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Optional: 

a. Chemistry 51 Quantitative Analysis 5 

b. Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

Mining Engineering 54 Metal Mining 2 

c. Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

Mining Engineering 69 Mining Geology 2 

d. Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

e. Options (Courses as approved) . . . 5 

Technical Report IV. . .• Y 2 

Second Semester, 19 hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Geology 72 Economic Geology II 5 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing of Materials 1 

Mining Engineering 59 Mine Examinations and Reports 2 

Mining Engineering 60 Thesis 2 

Optional: 

a. Metallurgy 53 Assaying 5 

b. Metallurgy 91 Metallurgy II 3 

Option 2 

<v Geology 63, 80 or 83 (Courses as approved) 5 

d. Options (Courses as approved) 5 

One extended inspection trip is required during the Junior or Senior year. 

Options. 

List from which to select optional courses in the department of geology, subject to approval. 
(For description of Courses see College and Graduate School) : 

Geology 52 Field Geology II (Summer Session) 6 

Geology 53 Field Geology Reports 3 

Geology 59 Geography and Geology of Kansas 2 

Geology 63 Invertebrate Paleontology II 5 

Geology 73 Structural and Dynamic Geology 5 

Geology 74 Fuel Technology 2 

Geology 80 Mineralogy II 5 

Geology 83 Petrology II 5 

Note. — In the Freshman Year students should take — 

a. In the First Semester: 

Engineering Drawing 1 and 2 Machine Drawing 4 

b. In the Second Semester: 

Machine Construction 3 Forging 1 

Machine Construction 5 Bench Work 1 



Courses of Study. 207 
chemical and metallurgical engineering. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, my hours credit. 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 5 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus 1 5 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Mechanical Engineering I Machine Design I 1 

Machine Construction 5 Bench Work 1 

Machine Construction 6 Machine Tool Work 1 

Technical Report 1 y 

Second Semester, 16}4 hours credit. 

Chemistry 3 Qualitative Analysis 5 

Physics 76 General Physics 5 

Geology 31 Mineralogy I 5 

Machine Construction 3 Forging 1 

Technical Report II y 

Chemical Engineering Option. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 18 y, hours credit. 

Chemistry 62 Organic Chemistry 1 5 

Chemistry 51 Quantitative Analysis 1 5 

Mechanics 50 General Mechanics 5 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

Technical Report III y 2 

Second Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Chemistry 80 Industrial Chemistry; Inorganic 3 

Chemistry 52 Quantitative Analysis II 5 

Chemistry 63 Organic Chemistry II 5 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 17y hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Chemistry 81 Industrial Chemistry; Organic 3 

Chemistry 70 Physical Chemistry I 5 

Metallurgy 90 Metallurgy 1 3 

Metallurgy 93 General Metallurgy 2 

[Optional from Chemistry Deportment, 4| 

•j hours or (4 

( Optional 2 hours and Thesis 2 hours I 

Technical Report IV y 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Chemistry 71 , Physical Chemistry II 5 

Metallurgy 53 Assaying ."...'; 3 

Metallurgy 91 Metallurgy II 3 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Thesis 3 

One extended inspection trip is required during the Senior year. 

Metallurgical Engineering Option. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Metallurgy 90 Metallurgy 1 3 

Metallurgy 93 General Metallurgy 2 

English 59 Advanced Composition I 3 

Chemistry 51 Quantitative Analysis 1 5 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Second Semester, 17,^ hours credit. 

Metallurgy 91 Metallurgy II 3 

Metallurgy 92 Metallurgy Laboratory 2 

Chemistry 52 Quantitative Analysis II 5 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

Mechanical Engineering 4 Steam Machinery 2 

Technical Report III 



208 School of Engineering. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Fikst Semester, 18K hours credit. 

Chemistrv 70 Physical Chemistry I «5 

Geology 2a (or 2) Elementary Geology 3 

Electrical Engineering 60 Elements of Electrical Engineering 3 

Mining Engineering 53 Ore Dressing I 2 

Mining Engineering 56 Mine Plant and Mill Design 1 2 

Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

Technical Report_IV J^ 

Second Semester, 19 hours credit. 

Metallurgy 53 Assaying 5 

Metallurgy 95 Metallography 2 

Mining Engineenng 58 Ore dressing II 4 

Mining Engineering 55 Mining Hydraulics 2 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Thesis As approved by adviser 5 

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Semester, 17 hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 1 Free-hand Drawing I 2 

Mathematics 2 College Algebra 3 

Mathematics 3 Plane Trigonometry 2 

German, French, or Spanish* (Course as approved) 5 

English IE Rhetoric 1 3 

Engineering Drawing 1 Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing 2 

Engineering 1 Engineering Lecturer. 

Physical Education 1 Gymnasium, 3 periods per week. 

Second Semester, 17 hours credit. 
Course number. Subject. Hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 2 Free-hand Drawing II 2 

Mathematics 4 E Analytic Geometry and Theory of Equations 5 

German, French, or Spanish (Course as approved) 5 

English 2 E Rhetoric II 2 

Engineering Drawing 3 Descriptive Geometry 3 

Physical Education 2 Gymnasium, 3 periods per week. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Semester, 18H hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 3 Architectural Design 1 3 

Architectural Engineering 5 History of Architecture 1 3 

Architectural Engineering 7 Architectural Drawing I , 1 

Architectural Engineering 9 .• Shades and Shadows 1 

Mathematics 5 E Calculus 1 5 

Physics la General Physics 5 

Technical Report I y 2 

Second Semester, 183^ hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 4 Architectural Design II 3 

Architectural Engineering 6 History of Architecture II 8 

Architectural Engineering 8 Architectural Drawing II 1 

Physics lb General Physics 5 

Mathematics 6 E Calculus II 3 

Civil Engineering 50 Surveying 3 

Technical Report II 3^ 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 18^ hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 50 '. Architectural Design III 3 

Architectural Engineering 56 History of Architecture III 2 

Architectural Engineering 58 Building Construction 1 3 

Architectural Engineering 62 Architectural Drawing III 1 

Chemistry 2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

Mechanics 50 Mechanics 5 

Technical Report III y 2 

*French preferred. 



Courses of Study. 209 



Second Semester, 17X> hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 51 Architectural Design IV 3 

Architectural Engineering 59 Building Construction II 3 

Ai chitectui al Engineering 61 Building Sanitation 1 

Architectural Engineering 63 Architectural Drawing IV 1 

Mechanics 51 Strength of Materials 4 

Mechanics 52 Testing Laboratory 1 

Mechanics 53 Graphic Statics 2 

Mechanical Engineering 54 Heating and Ventilation 2 

Technical Report IV y % 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester, 18 hours credit. 

Architectural Engineering 52 Architectural Design V 2 

Civil Engineering 61 Stresses in Framed Structures 5 

Civil Engineering 65 Reinforced Concrete 3 

Economics IE Elements of Economics 3 

English 59 Advanced Composition 3 

Architectural Engineering 67 Office Practice and.Specifications 2 

Second Semester, 15 houis credit. 

Architectural Engineering 53 Architectural Design VI 2 

Architectural Engineering 57 Thesis 3 

Architectural Engineering 65 Steel Construction 3 

Mechanics 57 Hydraulic Cement 1 

Engineering 52 Industrial Administration 3 

Electrical Engineering 64 Electrical Engineering for Architects 3 

One extended inspection trip is required during the Junior or the Senior year. 

Note. — A course in Architecture is being planned, to become operative in 1919-20. 

ENGINEERING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

(a) Transportation Group. Same as in Civil Engineering. 

(b) Manufacturing Group. Same as in Mechanical, Electrical, Mining, 

or Chemical Engineering. 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

(a) Transportation Group. Civil Engineering schedule, modified by in- 

troduction of Elements of Economics. 

(b) Manufacturing Group. Mechanical Engineering schedule, modified 

for those who have not taken Economics 1 E. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS. 

(a) Transportation Group. To follow Civil Engineering schedule, with 

Economics 6 E, Economic History of the United States; 3, Elements 
of Accounting; and other approved courses substituted for engineering 
courses. 

(b) Manufacturing Group. To follow Mechanical Engineering schedule, 

with the same substitutions of courses in Economics as those indicated 

above. 
The total of courses in Economics, History, and Sociology to be taken by 
students in Engineering and Administrative Science must amount to not 
less than 20 and not more than 26 hours. 

Note. — Complete schedules for the four years of work in each group will be available in 1919-20. 
The Manufacturing Group becomes a course in Industrial Engineering and the Transportation 
Group a course in the economics of Transportation and Engineering Construction. 



14— K. U.— 5419. 



210 School of Engineering. 



CURRICULUM. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

To be admitted to these courses of study the student must have completed 
all of the requirements for admission and thirty hours of work in the College. 
His work should have been selected so that at the close of the year in the 
College he will have completed, in entrance work and in College work com- 
bined, the following specified hours (it is understood that one complete 
College entrance unit equals five hours work in the University) : 
20 hours in Mathematics. 
20 hours in English. 
20 hours in Foreign Language. 
5 hours in Physics or Chemistry. 
If his work has not been selected to fulfill these requirements, the student 
will be required to make up all deficiencies. 

WORK REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION. 

Students who have completed the year of College work will proceed with 
the engineering work in substantially the same order as indicated for the 
regular four-year students. A total of 160 hours in the five years is 
required. The foreign language requirement is greater than for the four- 
year students, 25 hours being required in entrance and university work 
combined, of which 13 hours shall be in one modern language. 



School of Engineering. 211 



EQUIPMENT. 

The School of Engineering is a part of the University; hence the en- 
tire equipment of the University is also equipment of the School of 
Engineering in all things in which engineering students are concerned. 
The work of the Engineering School which is common to several schools 
of the University, such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, languages, 
etc., is carried on to some extent in buildings and by departments of in- 
struction not exclusively for engineering students; while such work of 
the School as is technical and exclusively engineering in character is 
carried on by departments of instruction primarily for engineering 
students and largely in buildings erected for the special work of the 
School. Below is described that part of the general equipment of the 
University which pertains chiefly to the work of this School. For other 
equipment, see "The College" and descriptions of other schools of the 
University. 

BUILDINGS. 

The buildings erected exclusively for engineering work are Marvin 
Hall, the mechanical laboratory in connection with the power plant, and 
the Fowler Shops. The work in mining and geology is provided for in 
Haworth Hall, and courses in chemical and metallurgical subjects are 
conducted in the chemistry building. For description of the buildings, 
see the General Information section. 

LIBRARIES. 

The general University library is available for use of engineering 
students. The engineering library contains books, periodicals, pam- 
phlets, maps, and manuscripts for use in the study of civil, mechanical, 
electrical, and architectural engineering. The departmental libraries 
in chemistry, geology, physics and astronomy, and mathematics are open 
to engineering students. Large plates and other illustrative material 
for the use of architecture students are in the reading room of the 
architectural engineering department. 

DRAWING ROOMS. 

Drawing rooms in Marvin Hall, furnished with individual tables con- 
taining drawers for each student's outfit, cabinets for drawing boards, 
etc., are provided for the work in general mechanical drawing, machine 
design, bridge and structural design, and architecture. Drawing rooms 
in Haworth Hall are similarly provided for the work in mining engineer- 
ing. 

On the walls and in print cases are photographs and drawings of ac- 
tual construction and blue prints of working drawings for bridges, rail- 
road structures, sewers, waterworks, mine plants, buildings, etc. 

LABORATORIES. 

Care has been taken to provide laboratory equipment of maximum 
effectiveness in the teaching of undergraduates. In certain of the labora- 
tories, moreover, the means are at hand for carrying on more advanced 
research work. 

For the work in pure science the laboratories of the College depart- 
ments of physics, chemistry, and bacteriology are available. In this 
way engineering students are afforded all necessary opportunities for 
gaining familiarity with the most approved methods of carrying on work 
in the respective branches. Chemical-engineering students continue for 
a much longer time in the use of the apparatus provided in the depart- 



212 School of Engineering. 

ment of chemistry than do the other students. Similarly, electrical- 
engineering students continue in the use of the finer types of electrical 
measuring instruments, which are provided in the well-equipped labora- 
tories of the physics department. Mining-engineering students, and 
those following -the civil-engineering option in sanitary and municipal 
work, draw largely also upon the pure-science laboratories, the former 
mainly in the lines of metallurgy and chemistry, the latter in the chem- 
ical and bacteriological examination of water and sewage. 

In applied science the laboratories of the School of Engineering next 
come into use. Particular attention is paid to the work which is given 
to large numbers of engineering students irrespective of department 
groups. Among these are: the laboratory for the investigation of the 
strength of materials, which is provided with a special machine on which 
loads may be carried to a maximum of 200,000 pounds, and in which 
several smaller-capacity machines are employed for all student work; 
the laboratory for experimental work in hydraulics, which is equipped 
for the usual work in the measurement of flow of water over weirs, 
through pipes, and for measuring performance of pumps, water motors, 
etc., the complete outfit of surveying instruments, by means of which 
the department of civil engineering carries on its work in connection 
with the teaching of surveying in all of its various refinements; the 
laboratory for the study of electrical machines of all kinds, and which 
is especially well equipped with respect to standardizing apparatus for 
the most accurate forms of electrical measuring instruments employed 
in engineering practice; the laboratory devoted to the study of electric- 
lighting problems, equipped with modern photometer and other apparatus 
adequate for the work; the laboratory for the study of steam and gas- 
engine power development, equipped with many representative types of 
engines, boilers, and other lines of equipment necessary for an actual 
study of operating conditions; and the machine construction laboratory 
which is equipped with machines for the carrying on of all of the or- 
dinary processes in shop work, but which is so employed that students 
may be considered to be studying methods employed in the production of 
machines rather than engaged in acquiring manipulative skill. 

A third form of laboratory equipment is that applied to special prob- 
lems in connection with the various lines of specialized work. Each 
of the departments is equipped in this way, all in very satisfactory 
measure with respect to undergraduate student work. The civil-engi- 
neering department is equipped to give special work for those engaged 
in the advanced branches of railway surveying, and for the investiga- 
tion of road-making materials. It owns a complete outfit for its work 
carried on during the summer surveying-camp period. The department 
of mechanics is equipped to carry on special investigations in reinforced 
concrete, and with various other forms of material employed in engi- 
neering structures. The electrical-engineering department is provided 
with necessary equipment for carrying on research work with alternat- 
ing-current machinery, in telephony, and with electrical measuring in- 
struments. The mechanical-engineering department, in connection with 
the University power plant, is able to carry on many lines of investiga- 
tion in steam-power generation, with gas engines, with refrigerating 
apparatus, and in the study of fuels and lubricating oils. With the 
proper equipment, and in cooperation with the department of metallurgy, 
students are enabled to make special studies of tool steels, and the effects 
of heat upon metal of various kinds. The mining engineering labora- 
tories are equipped for large-scale tests on various ores, for washing 
coal in ten-ton lots, for the study of fuels and of coal-mine explosions. 
Students are given mine-surveying practice in the State Mine at Lansing 
and in the tunnels of the University heating system, and practice in 
tunneling and the use of explosives in the experimental mine on the 
campus. 

In the lines of applied chemistry and metallurgy the equipment is 



Equipment. 213 

of high grade and well adapted to the carrying on of work characteristic 
of the chemical industries as well as for the study of special metals and 
the analytical work on ores and the many other forms of material with 
which the industrial chemist must deal. In the rooms of the architectu- 
ral-engineering depaj'tment are deposited the many illustrative drawings, 
plates, and lantern slides which are of service in the study of architectu- 
ral forms and in creative designing work, which fills so important a 
position in the training of the architect. 



214 School of Engineering. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING. 

Professors: Goldsmith, Frazier, Rice (H. A.), Shaad 
Instructor: Bailey (LaF.). 

1.— Free-hand Drawing I. Two hours credit. First semester, M. W. 
b ., 1 to 4. Charcoal and pencil drawing from the cast. Frazier. 

2.— Free-hand Drawing II. Two hours credit. Second semester, six 
hours. Theory of perspective, free-hand perspective, shades and shadows. 

Frazier. 

3.— Architectural Design I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
nine hours. A study of the elementary architectural forms and funda- 
mental construction features, their employment in architectural com- 
position, the classic orders. Drafting-room work and informal lectures. 

Bailey. 

4.— Architectural Design II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
nine hours. Continuation of course 3, the application of the orders in ele- 
mentary design. A study and analysis of architectural composition based 
on the orders, designed to train the student in the aesthetics of archi- 
tecture and the fundamentals of design. Drafting-room work and in- 
formal lectures. Bailey. 

5.— History of Architecture I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
three hours. An analytical study of architectural development of the his- 
toric styles, explaining the underlying principles of construction and 
design, influence of materials, and effects of religious and political con- 
ditions. The first semester will include the architecture of Egypt, 
Assyria, Persia, Greece, and Rome. Illustrated lectures, reading, and 
sketching. Goldsmith. 

6.— History of Architecture II. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, three hours. Continuation of course 5, from the close of Roman 
supremacy through the periods of Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic 
development, and the Renaissance. Illustrated lectures, reading, sketch- 
ing, and research. Goldsmith. 

7. — Architectural Drawing I. One hour credit. First semester, 
three hours. Pencil drawing from casts of architectural ornament and 
historic details, designed to prepare the student for the free use of 
sketching in architectural composition and design. Bailey. 

8. — Architectural Drawing II. One hour credit. Second semester, 
three hours. Continuation of course 7. Pen, pencil, and brush work. 

Bailey. 

9. — Shades and Shadows. One hour credit. First semester, three 
hours. Application of the principles of descriptive geometry in casting 
conventional shadows. Conventional rendering of architectural subjects. 

Goldsmith. 

50. — Architectural Design III. Three hours credit. First semester, 
nine hours. Continuation of course 4. Problems in theoretical design, 
alternating with problems in constructive design, working drawings and 
details, applying the knowledge gained in course 58. Bailey. 

51. — Architectural Design IV. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
nine hours. Continuation of course 50. Problems in design of increased 
importance, alternating with problems in constructive design based on 
course 59. Beaux Arts Institute of Design competitions. Bailey. 

52. — Architectural Design V. Two hours credit. First semester, 
six hours. A course of engineering design combining problems in en- 



Description of Courses. 215 

gineering with architectural composition and applying the technical 
knowledge gained in the engineering courses. Goldsmith, Bailey. 

53. — Architectural Design VI. Two hours credit. Second semester 
six hours. Continuation of course 52. Goldsmith, Bailey. 

56. — History of Architecture III. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, two hours. Continuation of course 6, including the classic and 
Gothic revivals and modern architecture in Europe and the United 
States. Illustrated lectures, reading sketching, and research. 

Goldsmith. 

57. — Thesis. Three hours credit. Second semester, six hours. An ex- 
tended problem in architectural-engineering design requiring complete 
plans, elevations, section and construction details, with outline specifica- 
tions of building materials and methods. The subject may be chosen by 
the student with the approval of the professor of architecture. 

Goldsmith. 

58. — Building Construction I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
three hours. A study of the principles of wooden construction and their 
application in structural design, working drawings, and details. This 
course considers building and finishing woods, framing of wooden build- 
ings, details of exterior finish, interior woodwork, and cabinet work. 
Lectures, reading, and drafting-room work. Goldsmith. 

59. — Building Construction II. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, three hours. A study of the principles of masonry construction and 
their application. This course considers building stones, brickwork, terra 
cotta, simple cast-iron and steel work, fireproofing, and plastering. 
Lectures, reading, and drafting-room work. Goldsmith. 

61. — Building Sanitation. One hour credit. Second semester. 
Plumbing sewerage, water-supply, and plumbing fixtures. Lectures, 
reading, and drafting-room work. Goldsmith. 

62. — Architectural Drawing III. One hour credit. First semester, 
three hours. Continuation of course 8. Bailey. 

63. — Architectural Drawing IV. One hour credit. Second semester, 
three hours. Continuation of course 62. ' Bailey. 

65. — Steel Construction. Three hours credit. Second semester, nine 
hours, M. Tu. W., at 1. A course in steel framing of buildings. Draft- 
ing-room work. H. A. Rice. 

67. — Office Practice and Specifications. Two hours credit. First 
semester, two hours. A course dealing with the essentials of office 
practice and of specification writing. Goldsmith. 

68. — Electrical Engineering for Architects. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. A course covering electrical installations for buildings. 
For students in architectural engineering, either Junior or Senior year. 

Shaad. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

Instructor : Treece. 

53E. — Sanitary Water Analysis. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, 8 to 10. (See chemistry 54.) This work will cover bacteriological 
technic and reading along general lines, followed by special work on the 
bacteriology of water and sewage. Designed for students in sanitary 
engineering, but open to others who have had chemistry 3, if the in- 
structor's consent has been secured in advance. Treece. 

For other courses in Bacteriology see The College. 



216 School of Engineering. 

chemistry. 

Professors: Bailey, Cady (Chairman of the Department), 

Dains, Whitaker.* 
Associate Professors: Allen, Stratton,* Faragher.* 
Assistant Professors: Long, B^uckmiller,* Estes, Brewster, 

Elsey, Wertheim. 
Instructors: Seibel,* Berger, Murray, Rader, Lange. 

Fees will be charged in the various courses to cover cost of materials, 
breakage, etc. 

2. — Inorganic Chemistry. Four or five hours credit. First semester. 
Lectures and recitations, M. W. F., 8 or 9. Laboratory, Tu. Th., 8 to 10 
or 1 to 3. Chemical and mining-engineering students take four hours 
laboratory, others two hours. Cady, Elsey, and assistants. 

3. — Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Four or five 
hours credit. Second semester. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., 8 or 9. 
Laboratory, M. W. F., 8 to 10 or 1 to 3. Chemical-engineering students 
take six hours laboratory, others four hours. Prerequisite, course 2. 

Cady, Elsey, and assistants. 

5. — Engineering Chemistry. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Recitations, Tu. Th., at 9; laboratory, F., 1 to 4. Required of mechani- 
cal- and civil-engineering students. Cady and assistants. 

51. — Quantitative Analysis I. Two, three, or five hours credit. 
Both semesters, 10 to 12 or 1 to 3. A general course covering the 
fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Five- 
hour course required of chemical- and mining-engineering students. Pre- 
requisite, course 3. Allen and assistants. 

52. — Quantitative Analysis II. Two, three, or five hours credit. 
Both semesters, 1 to 3, or by appointment. In the latter part of the 
course the volumetric analysis of ores and metallurgical products will be 
taken up. In connection with this work some specialty, such as cement, 
glass, or packing-house industry, rock analysis, paint analysis, etc., may 
be pursued. Five-hour course required of chemical-engineering students. 
Prerequisite, course 51. Allen and assistants. 

52 A. — Sanitary Water Analysis Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 10 to 12. Laboratory work in the sanitary analysis of water and 
sewage. Lectures and assigned readings on the interpretation of results 
and upon the methods used. Especially designed to fit students for 
commercial positions in this line of work. Prerequisite, course 51. 

Allen. 

52 B. — Boiler-water Analysis. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
10:30 to 12:30. Laboratory work in the analysis and softening of boiler 
waters. Lectures and assigned readings on softening problems and com- 
mercial practice in water treatment. Especially designed to fit students 
for commercial positions in this line of work. Prerequisite, course 51. 

Allen. 

52C. — Gas Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. A laboratory course of general gasometric methods, analysis of 
flue gases, artificial and natural gases. Prerequisite, course 51. 

Allen. 

52D. — Food Analysis. Three hours credit. Both semesters, by ap- 
pointment, Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 
or 62. Long. 

52E. — Oil Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. The examination of petroleums and products, lubricating oils, 
asphalts, and road materials. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52F. — Iron and Steel Analysis. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, by appointment. Analysis of special steels and alloys. Prerequisite, 
course 51. Allen. 



Absent on leave. 



Description of Courses. 217 

52G. — The Chemistry of Milling and Baking. Two hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Designed to meet the requirements 
of chemists desiring to carry on control work in the milling industry. 
Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. Long. 

52H. — Industrial Organic Analysis Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, by appointment. Includes analyses of soap, paper, leather, 
starches, etc. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. Estes. 

521. — Wet Assaying. Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Volumetric methods for the estimation of copper, lead, zinc, 
manganese, iron, silver, gold, etc. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52J. — Electrolytic Estimation of Metals Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, by appointment. A laboratory course. Prerequisite, 
course 51. Allen. 

62. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit. First 
semester. Recitations, M. W. F., at 9. Laboratory, Tu. and Th. morn- 
ings. Required of chemical-engineering students. In this course the 
aliphatic series only is discussed, the aromatic series being reserved for 
organic chemistry 63. Prerequisite, 10 hours chemistry. 

Dains, Brewster. 

63. — Advanced Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Recitations, M. W. F., at 9. Laboratory, Tu. and Th. morn- 
ings. Aromatic series. Required of chemical-engineering students. Pre- 
requisite, course 62. Dains, Brewster. 

70. — Physical Chemistry I. Five hours credit. First semester, six 
hours, at 10. A course paying special attention to electrochemistry. 
Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisites, course 3 or 
course 51, physics IE and 2E, and mathematics 5E. Required of chem- 
ical- and electrical-engineering students; optional for mining engineers. 

Cady. 

71. — Physical Chemistry II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
seven hours, at 10. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Re- 
quired of chemical-engineering students. Cady. 

80. — Inorganic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, at 11. Required of Junior chemical-engineering students. 
A study of the inorganic industries, including such topics as the manu- 
facture of acids, alkalies and other chemicals, fertilizers, paints and 
pigments, glass and cement, and the purification of water. Prerequisites, 
courses 2 and 3. Whitaker, Estes. 

81. — Organic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 9. Required of Senior chemical-engineering students. A 
study of the organic industries, including such topics as the refining of 
petroleum, the distillation of wood and coal, packing houses, fermenta- 
tion, soaps, leather, paper, starches, sugars, dyestuffs, etc. Prerequisites, 
courses 2, 3, and 62. Whitaker, Estes. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Professors: Williams, Rioe (H. A.). 
Associate Professors : Haskins, McNowx. 
Assistant Professors : Brown (F. L.), Roberts, 
Joxks (J. O.). 

1. — Elementary Surveying. Three hours credit. First semester, one 
hour of class work, F., at 10 and 11; two hours of field work, com- 
putation and plotting, M. and W., from 1 to 4. Required of civil- and 
mining-engineering Sophomores. Use and care of engineer's chain, transit, 
and level. Adjustments of transit and level. Land surveying methods 
and computations. Prerequisite, mathematics 3. McNown. 

2. — Higher Surveying. Three hours credit. Second semester, F. at 
11, with field work W. and F., at 1 to 4. Required of civil- and mining- 



218 School of Engineering. 

engineering Sophomores. Topographic and hydrographic surveying. Con- 
trol of surveys, including introduction to engineering astronomy. Pre- 
requisite, civil engineering 1. McNown. 

3. — Summer Field Work. Ten hours a day for four weeks at the close 
of the college year is required of Sophomore civil-engineering students, 
and the same for two weeks is required of Sophomore mining-engineering 
students. A topographical survey of an area is made from a camp. Prac- 
tice in taking topography by transit and stadia, and by plane table, 
measurements of a basis line, triangulation, leveling, and determination of 
azimuth latitude and time, constitute the work. Prerequisite, civil en- 
gineering 2. McNown. 

4. — Railway Surveying. Two hours credit. Second semester, Tu. 
Th., at 9. Required of civil-engineering Sophomores. A study of 
railway curves and earthwork, with field exercises. Prerequisite, civil 
engineering 1. McNown. 

5. — Roads and Pavements. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
Sophomore year, Tu. Th., at 11. A study of methods used in the construc- 
tion and improvement of country roads and city streets. An extended 
study of paving materials and of the principles governing the selection of 
a pavement. Same time given to laboratory testing of materials. Pre- 
requisite, civil engineering 1, 2, and 3. Williams. 

50. — Elementary Surveying. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 
Two hours of class work, Tu. Th., at 9 in the first and at 8 in the 
second semester. One hour of field from 1 to 4, on M. in the first and 
on Tu. in the second semester. Required of Senior electrical, and 
Sophomore architectural and mechanical students. A brief course based 
on course 1 and 2. McNown and Roberts. 

51. — Cartography. Two hours credit. First semester, Th. Fri., from 
1 to 4. Required of Junior civil-engineering students. Map projec- 
tion and the preparation of an accurate topographical map based on the 
field maps prepared in civil engineering 3. Prerequisite, civil engineer- 
ing 3. McNown. 

52. — City Planning. Two hours credit. Second semester, W. F., at 
8. Required of Junior sanitary students, and optional to Senior civil- 
engineering students. A study of city planning from the modern viewpoint, 
under such topics as city planning abroad, the American city, design of 
streets and street systems, parks and playgrounds, civic centers, water 
features, methods of acquiring land, and legislation. Lectures and as- 
signed readings. . McNown. 

53. — Geodesy. Three hours credit. First semester. Two hours in 
classroom and one in field, and computation. By appointment. Optional 
to Seniors. A brief study of the construction, use, and adjustment of the 
higher instruments of precision, and their use in the determination of the 
size and figure of the earth, including a study of the application of the 
method of least squares to the adjustment of observations. Prerequisite, 
civil engineering 3. McNown. 

55. — Railway Surveying. Four hours credit. First semester, Junior 
year, Tu. Th., at 9; M. W., at 1. A study of methods of laying out 
and constructing railways, with field practice consisting of a location 
survey of a line of sufficient length to familiarize the student with stand- 
ard methods of doing such work; calculation of waterways; bridge sur- 
veys; yards, turnouts, and easement curves. Prerequisites, civil engi- 
neering 1, 2, 3, and 4. Williams. 

57. — Railway Location. Three hours credit. Second semester ,_ Junior 
year, M. W. F., at 11. The principles involved in the economic loca- 
tion and construction of railways. Analysis of traffic and operating ex- 
penses. The influence of proposed changes in location upon the amount 



Description of Courses. 219 

of total revenue, the fixed charges, the operating expense, and the divi- 
dend-paying capacity of the road. Prerequisite, civil engineering 55. 

Williams. 

58. — Railway Terminals and Signaling. Two hours credit. First 
semester, Senior year, Tu. Th., at 8. A general study of terminal 
problems, the design of yard layouts and of terminal structures. Some 
time given to signal engineering. Prerequisite, civil engineering 55. 

Williams. 

59. — Railway Construction and Maintenance. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, Senior year, M. W. P., at 10. An advanced course in 
railway engineering, covering tunneling, economic handling of materials, 
masonry structures, trestles, timber preservation, as well as the theory 
and practice of railway maintenance. Prerequisite, civil engineering 55. 

Williams. 

61. — Stresses in Framed Structures Five hours credit. First se- 
mester, five hours, at 11. Analytical and graphical calculation of 
stresses in framed structures under various forms of loading. This 
course must be preceded by course 51 in mechanics. H. A. Rice. 

62. — Bridge Designing. Four hours credit. Second semester, eight 
hours, 1 to 4. A study in bridge details and the dimensions of parts. 
Students work out designs for a plate girder and a simple truss. Must 
be preceded by course 61. H. A. Rice. 

64. — Masonry. Two hours credit. First semester, Senior year, Tu. 
Th., at 10. Stone and brick masonry; the science of proportioning con- 
crete; foundations, including pile driving, cofferdams, pneumatic cais- 
sons, etc.; dams, retaining walls, piers and abutments, masonry bridges. 
Prerequisite, mechanics 50 and 51. Williams. 

65. — Reinforced Concrete. Three hours credit. Senior, first semes- 
ter, M. W. F., at 10. A course in the modern theory and practice in the 
design of beams, floor slabs, columns, conduits, retaining walls, arches, 
and other forms of reinforced concrete construction. Mathematical 
theory, study of plans, and design of typical structures. Prerequisite, 
mechanics 51. H. A. Rice. 

66. — Reinforced Concrete Design. One hour credit. Second semester, 
Senior. This course supplements course 65. Designs of beams, slabs, re- 
taining walls, etc., together with a complete analysis of a reinforced- 
concrete arch, are made. Prerequisite, civil engineering 65. 

H. A. Rice. 

67. — Higher Structures. Three hours credit. Second semester, Sen- 
ior, M. W. F., at 9. An advanced course in bridges, including swing 
bridges, cantilever bridges, suspension bridges, and arches. Some work 
will be given in calculations of deflections and statically indeterminate 
stresses. H. A. Rice. 

,70. — Water Supplies. Five hours credit. First semester, three hours, 
M. W. F., at 11. The collection and distribution of water supplies. 
Requisites of supply as to quality and quantity. Design of distribution, 
collection and storage works. 

71. — Sewerage. Two hours credit. T. Th., at 11. An elementary 
course in the collection, removal and disposal of city sewage. Principles 
of the design and construction of sewers and storm drains. Prerequisite, 
mechanics 55. Jones, J. O. 

72. — Advanced Sanitary Engineering. Four hours credit. Second 
semester, four hours, M. Tu. W. Th., at 9. A more detailed study of the 
subjects treated in course 59. The purification of public water suppplies 
and the treatment of sewage. Haskins. 

73. — Sanitary Engineering Design. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester, five hours, at 1. An advanced course to be taken simulta- 



220 School of Engineering. 

neously with course 71. The student works out, by practical problems 
the principles learned in courses 70 and 71. Haskins. 

74. — Sanitary Science and Public Health Problems. Two hours 
credit. First semester, two hours, Tu. Th., at 9. A broad general 
view of the large body of sanitary science upon which the modern practice 
of sanitation is based. The effects of good practice in such matters as 
public water supply, sewerage and drainage, state and federal control 
over the pollution of streams, vital statistics. Haskins. 

75. — Waste and Garbage Disposal. One hour credit. Second semes- 
ter, one hour, M., at 11. A lecture course in the practice of street 
cleaning, refuse and garbage collection and disposal. Haskins. 

76. — Irrigation and Drainage Engineering. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. Optional to Seniors. Impounding, diversion, convey- 
ance, measurement and duty of water; irrigation structures; irrigation 
law; drainage factor; design of drainage system; assessment of bene- 
fits; drainage law. McNown. 

76. — Seminar. One-half hour credit. First semester, Senior year. 
Preparation and presentation of technical papers. Williams. 

ECONOMICS. 

Professor : Boynton. 
Assistant Professor : Ise. 

IE. — Elements of Economics. Three hours credit. First semester, 
M. W. F., at 11. This course endeavors to explain the general laws of 
man's relation to wealth. Special attention is given to the parts of the 
subject of special interest to engineering students, such as corporations, 
the economic activities of municipalities, organized labor, and the general 
labor problem. 

3. — -Economic and Financial History of the United States. Three 
hours credit. Second semester, at 9. Attention is given to colonial agri- 
culture, industry, and trade as an introduction to the course. After 1789, 
the main lines of study are the banking, transportation, and tariff history 
of the United States, with especial attention to the development of the 
natural resources, the rise of manufactures, and the expansion of cor- ' 
porate methods. Prerequisite, course 1. Boynton. 

Accounting I and II. See Economics 64 and 65. 

Cost Accounting. See Economics 66. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor : Siiaad. 

Assistant Professor: Johnson (F. E.). 

Instructor : . 

Courses 50 to 52, and 54 to 58, inclusive, and 61 are required of all 
electrical-engineering students. Courses 50, 53, 54, and 55 are required 
of mechanical engineering students. Courses 59 and 62 are optional for 
electrical-engineering students. 

50. — Dynamo Machinery. Three hours credit. Sophomore, second 
semester, three hours, at — for electrical-engineering students, and at 8 
for Senior mechanical-engineering students. Theory of direct-current 
generators and motors. Prerequisites, physics IE and 2E. 

F. E. Johnson. 

51. — Theory of Alternating Currents. Five hours credit. Juniors, 
first semester, three hours, at 8, for electrical-engineering students. 
A mathematical treatment of alternating-current phenomena and the 
theory of alternating-current machinery, fundamental types. Prerequi- 
site, course 50. Shaad. 

52. — Dynamo Machinery. Four hours credit. Junior, second semes- 
ter, five hours, at — . Advanced theory of alternating-current ma- 
chinery. Shaad. 



Description of Courses. 221 

53. — Theory of Alternating Currents. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, three hours, M. W. F., at 11 for Senior mechanical- 
engineering students. A study of the theory of alternating currents and 
alternating-current machinery, together with a discussion of motor ap- 
plications. Prerequisite, course 50. F. E. Johnson. 

54. — Electrical Laboratory. One and one-half hours credit. Sopho- 
more, second semester, three hours, two days per week on alternate weeks, 
1 to 4. An experimental course for the purpose of illustrating the 
principles of direct-current dynamo machinery and acquainting the stu- 
dent with the types and performance of direct-current apparatus. Must 

be preceded or accompanied by course 50. . 

55. — Electrical Laboratory. One and one-half hours credit. Junior, 
second semester, three hours, two days per week on alternate weeks, 
1 to 4. A continuation of course 54. Must be preceded or accompanied 
by course 51. More advanced work with direct-current machinery is 
given and experiments with alternating-current apparatus are intro- 
duced. Some time is devoted to the calibration of electrical instru- 
ments. . 

56. — Electrical Laboratory. One and one-half hours credit. Senior, 
first semester, three hours, two days per week, 1 to 4. Advanced 
experiments with electrical machinery and the testing of machines, 
chiefly of alternating-current types. Must be accompanied by course 
52. F. E. Johnson. 

57. — Illuminating Engineering. Three hours credit. Senior, first 
semester, three hours, Tu. Th., at 11. A course in illumination 
and photometry, in which the available light sources are studied and 
the methods of application to artificial illumination of streets and build- 
ings are discussed. Laboratory and field work in the measurement of 
light sources and illumination. F. E. Johnson. 

58. — Electric Power Transmission and Electric Railways. Five 
hours credit. Senior, second semester, five hours, at 9. A series of 
lectures and recitations devoted to the study of the principles involved 
and the methods used in the design of transmission and distributing 
systems and the theory and practice of the design, construction, and 
operation of electric-railway systems. Prerequisite, course 52. 

F. E. Johnson. 
59. — Elementary Telephony. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
five hours by appointment. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. 
The principles that underlie all telephone apparatus, and practical ex- 
periments with the fundamental telephone transmitters, receivers, and 
central-station arrangements. Optional for Juniors or Seniors. 

Shaad. 
60. — Elements of Electrical Engineering. Three hours credit. 
First semester, at 9. A course covering the general field of electrical 
engineering, and prepared especially for civil-engineering students. 
Junior or Senior year. Shaad. 

61. — Professional Thesis. Senior, first semester, three hours, and 
second semester, nine hours, by appointment. Shaad, or other instruc- 
tors, according to the line of work chosen. 

62. — Central Stations. Three hours credit. Three hours in the 
classroom, M. W. F., at 10, and one period in the drafting room each 
week. A study of the design, construction, operation, and management 
of central electrical stations and substations. Shaad. 

63. — Advanced Electrical Laboratory. Five hours credit. Seniors, 
second semester, by appointment. A continuation of course 56. More 
advanced and extended experiments with electrical machinery and cir- 
cuits, introducing the experimental study of transient electrical phe- 
nomena. F. E. Johnson. 



222 School of Engineering. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 

Dean : Walker. 

Associate Professor : Sluss. 

Assistant Professor : . 



1. — Engineering Lectures. First semester, Tu., at 3. A course 
of lectures given to Freshmen during the first semester. The purpose is 
twofold: first, to give the student a more adequate idea of engineering as 
a profession; second, to assist those who have not decided upon the 
courses of study to be pursued to gain a more definite conception of the 
field covered in each. About one-third of the course is given by the Dean 
and the remainder by other members of the engineering faculty. 

51. — Industrial Engineering II. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, Senior. Manufacturing processes employed in certain typical indus- 
tries; elements of cost; power as. a factor in costs; power applications; 
engineering practice in the industries with especial reference to selection 
of equipment. . 

52. — Industrial Administration. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, at 8. Development of modern industrial systems; forms of 
ownership — partnerships and corporations; contract principles, and prac- 
tice in contract writing for engineering work ; organization of transporta- 
tion and manufacturing companies; analysis of costs; labor wage sys- 
tems. Special lectures on real property, agency, and torts. Mining-en- 
gineer students are allowed to take a portion of the course for two hours 
credit. Walker. 

ENGINEERING DRAWING. 

Professor : Hood. 
Associate Professor: Woi/fe. 
Assistant Professor : Grider. 
Assistant Instructor : Jatcowsky. 

1. — Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing. Two hours credit. Fresh- 
man, both semesters; six hours or twelve hours; first semester, M. W. F., 
8 to 10; or Tu. Th., 8 to 11; or M. Tu. W. Th., 1 to 4; or F., 1 to 5, and 
Sat., 8 to 11. Second semester, M. W. F., 8 to 10; or M. W., 1 
to 4. Engineering lettering in pencil and in ink. Free-hand working 
sketches and perspective sketches of simple machine parts. Working 
drawings of simple machine part. Penciling, tracing, and blue-printing. 
Detailing machine parts from assembly drawings. 

Hood, Wolfe, Grider, Jakowsky. 

2. — Machine Drawing. Two hours credit. Freshman, eighteen weeks 
or nine weeks of both semesters ; six hours or twelve hours. Same hours 
as in course 1. Sketches of machine parts and preparation of working 
drawings; detailing of machines from sketches, notes, assembly draw- 
ings, and assembled machines; tracing and blue-printing; notes and lec- 
tures on drafting-room methods. Each student prepares complete draw- 
ings for some simple machine. Hood, Wolfe, Grider. 

3. — Descriptive Geometry. Three hours credit. Freshman, second 
semester, three hours, M. W. F., at 8, 9, 10, 11, and 3; also first se- 
mester, at 11. Principles of projection. Execution of a large number of 
original exercises. Hood, Wolfe, Grider. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Associate Professor: Raymond. 
Instructor : Wattles,* . 



The instruction in -this department, while in essentials parallel to 
that in the College, is shaped with special reference to the other work 
of engineering students. Three of the courses here numbered are re- 
quired before graduation; for students who wish to spend more time in 
work of this kind appropriate classes in the College are open. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-19, first and second quarters. 



Description of Courses. 223 

IE. — Rhetoric I. Three hours credit. First semester, at 8, 9, 10, 11, 
2, and 3; second semester, at 11. Written exercises, with study of language 
usuage. Required of all Freshmen. Raymond, and assistants. 

2E. — Rhetoric II. Two hours credit. Second semester, at 8, 9, 10, 11, 
2, and 3. Continuation of course IE. Raymond, and assistants. 

59. — Advanced Composition I. Three hours credit. Both semesters; 
first semester, at 8; second semester, at 8. Practice in the gathering 
and analyzing of material, and in the presenting of information and 
opinion in written papers. Required of all engineering students, one 
publication. Optional for Seniors. Raymond. 

59A. — Advanced Composition II. Three hours credit. By appoint- 
ment. Continuation of course 59, with special regard to writing for 
publication. Optional for Seniors. Raymond. 

GEOLOGY. 

Professor : Ha worth. 
Associate Professor : Moore. 
Assistant Professors: Todd, Haynes. 
Instructor : Ellisor. 

2a (or 2) . — Elementary Geology. Three hours credit. Each semes- 
ter, at 8 or 10, with one laboratory period per week, from 1 to 3 on Wed- 
nesday. A study of the elements of the science, including a general out- 
line of geologic principles and agencies. An acquaintance with ele- 
mentary chemistry is very desirable in this course. Moore, Haynes. 

26. — Historical Geology 1. Two hours credit. Each semester, at 8 
or 10, with one laboratory period per week from 1 to 3 on Thursday. A 
study of the more important events in the past history of the earth, as a 
basis for the correct understanding of the present geography, rock struc- 
ture, and natural resources of the world. This course must be accom- 
panied by 2a (or 2). Required of mining engineers. Moore. 

4. — Field Geology. Two hours credit. Second semester, Saturday 
mornings. Field work and reports on the physiography and geology of 
Lawrence and vicinity. An introductory course for those who wish to 
learn the methods of field work. Must be preceded or accompanied by 
geology 2a (or 2 and 2b). Todd, Moore, Haynes. 

31. — Mineralogy I. Five hours credit. Second semester, M. Th. F., 
1 to 4. Six hours laboratory work. A brief course in crystallography, 
and descriptive and determinative mineralogy, including blow-pipe 
analysis. The characteristic of about 150 important minerals will be 
studied. Prerequisites, elementary chemistry. Haynes. 

50. — Geologic Processes. Three hours credit. First semester, at 11. 
An advanced course comprising a critical investigation of geologic 
agencies and the results of their work. The development of land forms 
and the principles of sedimentation, and the physiographic history of 
specific areas. Library and laboratory study, with special opportunity 
for training in the methods of geologic work. Prerequisites, geology 2a 
(or 2) and 26, and elementary physics and chemistry. Moore, Haynes. 

51. — Geologic and Topographic Maps. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 11. A study chiefly in the laboratory designed to give the 
student a thorough understanding of geologic and topographic maps and 
the ability to interpret them correctly. Prerequisite, geology 2a (or 2) 
and 26. Moore, Haynes. 

52. — Field Geology. Six hours credit. Summer session. A five 
weeks' course devoted to a study of the geology and physiography of 
parts of Kansas and Colorado, with detailed investigation of special 
areas. Prerequisite, geology 2a (or 2) and 26. Registration only after 
consultation with the instructors. Moore, Haynes. 



224 School of Engineering. 

53. — Field Geology Report. An additional credit of three hours will 
be given for a satisfactory thesis based upon the work of course 52. 

61. — Historical Geology II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
at 9. A study of the geologic history of the earth, the evolution and de- 
velopment of the continents, stratigraphy, and the history of plant and 
animal life from their earliest known beginnings to the present. The 
geologic significance and use of fossils in the identification and correla- 
tion of stratified rocks. Prerequisite, geology 2a (or 2) and 26. Ele- 
mentary zoology very desirable. Moore. 

62. — Invertebrate Paleontology I. Five hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. A study of the introduction and succession of 
fossil faunas, their composition, and geographic distribution. Practical 
exercise in the identification of faunas of different geologic ages. A 
classroom and laboratory course. Prerequisite, geology 2a (or 2) and 26. 

Moore. 
71. — Economic Geology I. Metals. Five hours credit. First se- 
mester, at 10. A general study of the metallic products of the mine, con- 
sidered from a scientific and a practical standpoint, including the nature, 
origin, amount, and geographic and geologic distribution of the same. 
Prerequisites, elementary chemistry and geology 2a (or 2) and 26. 
Lectures and library work. Haworth, Haynes. 

72. — Economic Geology II. Oil, Gas, and Coal. Five hours credit. 
Second semester, at 10. A careful study of oil and gas, regarding nature, 
origin, geography and geology, and economic importance. Much attention 
is paid to field conditions surrounding different oil fields and best 
methods for understanding same. Prerequisites, elementary chemistry 
and geology 2a (or 2) and 26. Haworth, Haynes. 

73. — Structural and Dynamic Geology. Five hours credit. First 
semester, at 2. A careful study of geological dynamics and results of 
dynamic actions, particularly on stratified rocks, and latest and best 
methods for field operations while studying same. Prerequisite, geology 
2a (or 2) and 26. ♦ Haworth. 

81. — Petrology I. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. Lithology, structure, texture, mineral and chemical composition, 
and the manner of formation and occurrence of igneous, sedimentary, 
and metamorphic rocks; geological problems confronting mining engi- 
neers, changes in grade, or character, of ore deposits. Effect of faulting, 
folding and intrusions of igneous rocks. Prerequisite, geology 2a (or 2) 
and 26. Haynes. 

82. — Petrography. Three hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. This course consists of training in the methods of petrographic 
study and includes the macroscopic and microscopic examination of the 
principal rock types and a consideration of the theories of modern petrol- 
ogy. Prerequisites, geology 2a (or 2) and 26. Haynes. 

GERMAN. 

Professors: Engel, Thurnau. 
Associate Professor: Kruse. 

1. — Elementary German. — Essentials of Grammar. Five hours 
credit. First semester, at 10:30; second semester, 1 to 3. Vos's Essen- 
tials of German. Engel, Kruse. 

2. — Prose Readings. Five hours credit. Second semester, at 10:30. 
Vos's Essentials of German completed. Reading of selected prose texts. 

Thurnau. 

3B. — Scientific German. Five hours credit. First semester, at 8:30. 
A thorough review of grammar, Das Edle Blut or equivalent text, forty 
to fifty pages, as introductory reading matter, followed by a scientific 



Description of Courses. 225 

German reader. The aim of the course is to introduce the student to the 
style and vocabulary of scientific German and develop the ability to read 
simple scientific writings. Kruse. 

4B. — Scientific German. Three hours credit. Second semester, at 
8:30. Reading of scientific German texts in class and assigned readings 
on selected topics outside of class. The aim of this course is to develop 
the rapid reading of more advanced scientific German in special fields. 

Kruse. 

HISPANIC LANGUAGES. 



Assistant Professor . 
Instructor : 



1. — Elementary Spanish. Five hours credit. First semester, at 
10:30 and 11:30. Instruction is by a modified form of the direct method. 
Berlitz: First Spanish Book. . 

2. — Elementary Spanish II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10:30 and 11:30. A continuation of course 1. Practice in writing and 
speaking Spanish. . 

MACHINE CONSTRUCTION. 

Assistant Prof essor : Jones (F. E.).* 
Instructors : Rocklund, Forney, Rutherford, Bailey, 
Leffert, Messenheimer. 

The work is designed to suit the needs of engineering students. 
It consists of practice work following demonstrations and recitations in 
the classroom. Textbook preparation and note writing are required in 
the class work. One hour of each regularly assigned weekly period is 
devoted to classroom work during a portion of thel semester. In the ad- 
vanced courses attention is given to modern methods of welding, heat 
treatment of high-carbon steels, machine-shop construction, the group- 
ing of machines, and methods followed in standardizing production. 

1. — Foundry Practice. One hour credit. Both semesters, three hours 
per week. Moulding, and management of the cupola furnace and brass 
furnace. Practice in melting and pouring iron and nonferrous alloys. 
Each squad of students is required to have entire charge of the melting 
and casting of a heat of iron at least once during the course. Required 
of mechanical-, electrical- and chemical-engineering students. Bailey. 

2. — Pattern Making. One hour credit. Both semesters, three hours 
per week. The principles of pattern making are studied in a practical 
way by having each student make patterns that are actually used in the 
foundry. Required of students in mechanical, electrical, and chemical 
engineering. Rocklund. 

3. — Forging. One hour credit. Both semesters, three hours per week. 
Complete course, including stock calculations, bending, drawing, welding, 
tempering, and hardening. Required of all excepting architectural stu- 
dents. Forney. 

5. — Bench Work. One hour credit. First semester, three hours per 
week. A machine-shop course in the use and care of tools, practice in 
filing, chipping, drilling, and riveting. Required of students in mechani- 
cal, electrical, and chemical engineering. Rutherford. 

6. — Machine Tool Work I. One hour credit. Second semester, 
three hours per week. Principally lathe work. Includes cutting off 
stock, centering, straight and taper turning and thread cutting; turn- 
ing steel, wrought iron, cast iron and brass. Required of students in 
mechanical, electrical, chemical, and mining engineering. Rutherford. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 

15— K. U.— 5419. 



226 School of Engineering. 

.7. — Machine Tool Work II. One hour credit. Second semester, 
three hours per week. Use of planer, shaper, milling machine, boring 
mill, turret lathe; laying out and making machine parts from the draw- 
ing; gear cutting. Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Rutherford. 

8. — Advanced Machine Shop Practice. One hour credit. First 
semester, three hours per week. Tool making. Hardening and temper- 
ing; grinding; autogenous welding, jig making; preparing and using 
high-speed and alloy steels; assembling machinery. Required of students 
in mechanical engineering. Rutherford. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Professor : Ashton. 

Assistant Professors: Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 

1. — Solid Geometry. Two hours credit. Second semester, two hours, 
10, 11. The usual theorems and constructions of standard textbooks 
and applications to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. Wheeler. 

2a. — Algebra. Three hours credit. First semester, three hours, 8, 
9, 10, 2, 3; second semester, three hours, 8. Review of elementary 
algebra; graphic representation, logarithms, determinants. Required of 
all Freshmen in the School of Engineering. 

Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 

2c. — College Algebra. Five hours credit. First semester at 8. This 
section is intended for those who enter with only one unit of algebra and 
will include a more thorough review of elementary algebra, together with 
the subjects named in 2a, 

3. — Plane Trigonometry. Two hours credit. First semester, two 
hours, 8, 9, 10, 2, 3 ; second semester, two hours, 8. The six trigonomet- 
ric functions, principal formulas of plane trigonometry, solution of tri- 
angles and practical problems. Required of all Freshmen in the School 
of Engineering. Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 

4E. — Analytic Geometry. Five hours credit. First semester, five 
hours, at 10; second semester, five hours, 8, 9, 10, 11, 1. The straight 
line and circle, conic sections, higher plane curves, solid analytic geome- 
try. Required of all Freshmen in the School of Engineering. 

Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 

5E. — Calculus I. Five hours credit. First semester, five hours, 9, 
10; second semester, five hours at 9. Differential calculus, applications 
to geometry and mechanics, maxima and minima, integral calculus, 
simple applications to length, areas, and volumes. Required of all Sopho- 
mores in the School of Engineernig. 

Ashton, Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 

6E. Calculus II. Three hours credit. First semester, three hours, 

at 11; second semester, three hours, 9, 10. Applications of the calculus 
to problems of solid geometry, double and triple integration, applications 
to areas, volumes, centers of gravity, and moments of inertia; simple 
differential equations. Required of all Sophomores in the civil, electri- 
cal, and mechanical courses. Ashton, Jordan, Lefschetz. 

57E. Selected Topics in Engineering Mathematics. Second se- 
mester three hours, at 11. Complex numbers and vectors, exponential 
and trigonometric series, hyperbolic functions, differential equations 
of electrical and mechanical engineering, empirical curves, methods o± 
approximation and numerical calculation. The course may be modified to 
suit the needs of the class. Optional for Juniors, Seniors, and graduates. 

Jordan. 

For other courses in mathematics, see The College. 



Description of Courses. 227 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor : Sibley. 
Associate Professor: Slvss. 

Assistant Prof essor : . 

Instructor: ROCKLTJND. 



1. — Machine Design I. Three hours credit. Sophomore, first se- 
mester, M. and Tu., at 9; and M., three hours, at 1. Materials used in 
machine construction, with a study of assembly and detail working 
drawings. Sibley. 

2. — Mechanism. Three hours credit. Junior, first semester, Tu. 
Th., at 9, and F., 1 to 4. A study of the motion of machine parts 
and of methods of transmission of motion by gears, belts, cams, and 
links. Recitations and drawing for mechanical-engineering students. 
Text, Sibley's Pure Mechanism. Sibley. 

3. — Elementary Machine Design. Three hours credit. Sophomore, 
second semester, M. W., at 9; Tu., 1 to 4. Design of representative 
machine parts and study of their relative motions. For electrical- 
engineering students. Sibley. 

4. — Steam Machinery. Two hours credit, (a) Fuels, combustion, and 
steam generation. (6) A study of boiler and engine types. Principal 
text, Heat Engines, by Allen and Bursley. Required of electrical engi- 
neering students. Sluss. 

5. — Engines and Boilers. Three hours credit. Sophomore, second 
semester, M. W. F., at 9; and five exercises in the steam laboratory, 
Sat., at 8 to 12. A brief study of the general problem of steam power 
generation from the standpoint of the installing engineer. Text, Heat 
Engines, by Allen and Bursley. Required of civil-engineering students. 
Physics IE is a prerequisite. Sluss. 

6. — Steam Engineering. Four hours credit. Sophomore, first se- 
mester, M. W. F., at 8, and W. Th., 1 to 4. Elements of steam 
machinery, with special reference to combustion of fuels, boiler types, 
engine mechanism and power-plant auxiliaries. Laboratory practice in 
proximate analysis of coal, and flue gas analysis. For mechanical-en- 
gineering students. Sluss. 

50. — Machine Design II. Four hours credit. Junior, second semester, 
M. W. F., at 10, and M. 1 to 4. Solution of problems in the design of 
general machine parts, including cylinders, plates, springs, riveted 
joints, bearings, journal shafts, gears, pulleys, and belts. Lectures, 
recitations, and drawing. Sibley. 

51. — Thermodynamics. Three hours credit. Junior first semester, 
M. W. F., at 8. The relation between heat and mechanical energy; 
theory of heat engines. Must be preceded by Physics IE and calculus. 
Required of mechanical-engineering students. Sluss. 

52. — Heat-engine Theory. Three hours credit. Junior, first semes- 
ter, M. W. F., at 9. A course for electrical-engineering students, 
treating the science of thermodynamics more briefly than in the pre- 
ceding course and including engine applications. Sluss. 

53. — Mechanics of Heat Engines. Two hours credit. Junior, sec- 
ond semester, two hours Tu. Th., at 9. Valve gears and governors of 
steam and internal combustion engines and turbines. Centrifugal inertia 
and shaking forces of the moving parts. Required of electrical-engineer- 
ing students. Course 52 is a prerequisite. Sibley. 

54. — Heating, Ventilating, and Refrigerating. Two hours credit. 
Senior, second semester, two hours at 8. Laws of heat transfer, 
amount of air required for ventilation, methods and apparatus employed 
in modern building, central heating plants. Sibley. 

56. — Motive Power Machinery. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Includes a brief review of the thermodynamics of engines and turbines 



228 School of Engineering. 

Determination of sizes for given horsepower; methods of compounding, 
regulation and balancing; study of details, including valves and valve 
gears, cylinders, rotating and reciprocating parts of engines, and nozzles, 
blades, and rotors of turbines. Required of mechanical-engineering stu- 
dents. Sibley. 

57. — Steam-engine and Turbine Design. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. Application of principles covered in course I to the design 
of special types of turbines. Optional for mechanical-engineering stu- 
dents. . Sibley. 

58. — Gas-engine and Compressor Design. Two hours credit. Senior, 
first semester. M. Tu., 1, W. Th., of alternate weeks, 1 to 4. General 
theory and practice of gas-engine and compressor design and construc- 
tion. Sibley. 

61. — Structural Design. Two hours credit. Senior, optional. Stresses 
in steel and reinforced concrete buildings, and design of members of 
the structure; design of chimneys, bins, and retaining walls. Sibley. 

64. — Mechanical Laboratory. One hour credit. Second semester, 
Junior, W. or Th., 1 to 4. Calibration of thermometers and indicator 
springs, physical properties of lubricating oils, valve setting, commercial 
testing of boilers, engines, and pumps. For mechanical-engineering stu- 
dents. Sluss and Garver. 

65. — Power Laboratory. One and one-half hours credit. Senior, 
first semester, M. or Tu., 1 to 4. Calibration of apparatus, fuel 
testing, laboratory tests of steam and gas prime movers, complete power- 
plant test. Outside preparation of preliminary and final reports. Pre- 
requisites, mechanical-engineering 4, 52, and 53. For electrical-engineer- 
ing students. Sluss. 

. 66. — Heat-engine Laboratory. One and one-half hours credit. 
Senior, second semester, M. or Tu., 1 to 4. Study of experimental en- 
gineering methods and their application to complete tests of boilers, 
steam and gas prime movers, compressors, and refrigerating units. Drill 
in report writing, and outside reading of literature bearing on power 
development. Prerequisites, mechanical-engineering 6, 51, and 56. For 
mechanical-engineering students. Sluss. 

67. — Thesis Three hours credit. Senior, both semesters. F., 1:30 
to 4:30. Sibley, Sluss. 

68. — Summer Vacation Work. Two months to be spent in regular 
work in some shop or manufacturing plant of good standing. A report 
on this work, with a certified statement from the shop foreman or the 
superintendent, must be presented before credit can be given. 

70. — Automotive Engineering. Lectures, recitations, and design. 
Measurements and observations made on automotive machinery. Labora- 
tory work includes study of types, sizes and methods of operating auto- 
motive equipment, and the testing of automotive engines. Junior, second 
semester. Three hours credit. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5 and Physics 

2E. Sluss and . 

MECHANICS. 

Professors: Rice (H. A.), Williams. 

Assistant Professors : Brown, Roberts, Jones (J. 0.). 

50. — Mechanics. Five hours credit. Junior, first semester, five hours, 
at 9, 10, 11; second semester, 10. A study of the laws of statics and 
dynamics. Action of forces upon bodies, and the resulting motions. Re- 
quired of all engineering students. Prerequisite, calculus I. 

Brown, Roberts. 

51. — Strength of Materials. Four hour credits. Junior, first se- 
mester, four hours, 8; second semester, 8, 9, 10. The theory of resistance 
to stress and application to engineering construction. Required of all 
engineering students. Prerequisite, mechanics 50. 

Brown 3 Roberts, J. O. Jones. 



Description of Courses. 229 

52. — Testing of Materials. One hour credit. Junior, second semes- 
ter, four hours, M. W. Th. or F., afternoon, or Sat. morning. A labo- 
ratory course to accompany course 51. The testing of iron, steel, wood, 
and other materials of construction for resistance to tension, compres- 
sion, torsion, bending, and shearing. Experimental determination of the 
limits of safe loading. The testing of paving brick. Brown, Roberts. 

53. — Graphic Statics Two hours credit. Junior, second semester, 
nine hours, 1 to 4. The properties of equilibrium polygons and other 
methods of representing the actions of forces, with application to the 
determination of stresses in beams, trusses, and arches. Lectures and 
drawing. Prerequisite, mechanics 50. Brown. 

54. — Engineering Materials. Two or five hours credit. First se- 
mester, hours, by appointment. A study of the methods of manu- 
facture of structural materials and the different means and machines 
used in their testing. Opportunity will be given for specialization along 
some particular line, if desired, and considerable experimental work may 
be done in the laboratory. Recitations, lectures, library, and laboratory 
work. Optional for Seniors. Prerequisite, mechanics 51. H. A. Rice. 

55. — Hydraulics. Three hours credit. First semester, 9; second se- 
mester, tliree hours, 9 to 10. A study of the laws governing the pressure 
and flow of liquids. Calculation of the flow through pipes and over 
weirs. The principles and types of pumping and hydraulic power ma- 
chinery. Required of Junior civil and Senior mechanical-engineering 
students. Prerequisite, mechanics 50. J. 0. Jones. 

56. — Hydraulic Laboratory. One hour credit. First and second se- 
mesters, two hours, M. W. or F., 3 to 5. A course to accompany course 
55. Experimental work with the flow of water over weirs and through 
orifices and pipes, and in testing hydraulic machinery. Required of 
Junior civil and Senior mechanical-engineering students. 

J. 0. Jones. 

57. — Hydraulic Cement. One hour credit. Second semester, two 
hours, M. or Th., 3 to 5. A laboratory course in testing hydraulic 
cements and making comparison of their qualities. Reading, experi- 
mental work, and reports of tests made. For Senior civil-engineering 
students. Prerequisite, civil engineering 64. Williams. 

58. — Hydraulic Power. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Water-power development. Rainfall and runoff, stream flow, 
preliminary plant layout, selection of standard water turbines, turbine 
design. Senior optional. J. 0. Jones. 

METALLURGY. 

Professor : . 

Assistant Professor: Estes. 

53. — Assaying and Metallurgical Analysis. Three or five hours 
credit. Second semester, five or ten hours, Tu. Th., 1 to 3. The first 
half of the semester is devoted to the fire assay of gold, silver, and other 
metals; the second half to the volumetric assay of ores and furnace pro- 
ducts. Junior mining-engineering students are required to take the 
entire course, carrying five credits; the Senior chemical-engineering 
students are required to take fire assaying the first half of the semester, 
and will receive three credits. , Estes. 

90. — Metallurgy I. Three hours credit. First semester, three hours, 
at 11. General metallurgy and the metallurgy of iron and steel. Lec- 
tures and recitations. Must be preceded by chemistry 3. Required of 
Junior mechanical-engineering students and Senior chemical-engineering 
students. , Estes. 

91. — Metallurgy II. Three hours credit. Second semester, three 
hours, M. W. F., at 9. Metallurgy of lead, zinc, and copper, followed 



230 School of Engineering. 

by that of silver, gold, mercury, and tin. Required of Senior mining 
and chemical-engineering students. Prerequisite, chemistry 3. 

, Estes. 

92. — Metallurgical Laboratory. Either semester, two hours. By 
appointment. Pyrometric and calorimetric measurements, preparation of 
silicates and alloys, oxidization and reduction reactions, amalgamation, 
chlorination, cyaniding and leaching, etc. Optional for Juniors, Seniors, 
and graduate students who have taken or are taking course 90 or 
course 91. * Estes. 

93. — General Metallurgy. Two hours credit. First semester, Tu. 
Th., 11:30. Physical properties of metals and alloys, thermal analysis, 
the measurement of high temperatures, refractories, slags, matte bul- 
lion, typical metallurgical operations. Required of chemical engineers. 

, Estes. 

95. — Metallography. Two hours credit. Second semester, by ap- 
pointment. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisite, metallurgy 90 
or 93. 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

Professors: Terrill, Humble. 
Associate Professor : Wolfe. 
Assistant Professor : Grider. 

50. — Mine Surveying. One hour credit. Second semester, three 
hours per week, Tu., 9 to 12. Instruments and methods used for under- 
ground traverse and connection surveys; shaft plumbing and special 
problems. Field work includes survey of tunnels under campus and ac- 
tual mine surveys. Prerequisite, civil engineering 1 and 2. Terrill. 

52. — Mining Law. One hour credit. Second semester, alternate 
years. Outline of the laws relating to the mining industries. Recita- 
tions and lectures. Humble. 

53. — Ore Dressing I. Two hours credit. First semester, one lecture, 
Tu., at 9, and three hours of laboratory work, Th., 1 to 4. Preliminary 
breaking, roll crushing, jigging, coarse screening, coal washing. Re- 
quired of students in coal and metal mining. A modified course covering 
textbook principles, open to Juniors and Seniors in the College and in 
the School of Engineering, is offered as a three-hour credit option. Lec- 
tures and recitations. Grider. 

54. — Metal Mining. Two hours credit. First semester, Tu. Th., at 
8. Methods of prospecting and mining all kinds of mineral deposits; 
study of special methods, and costs of working large ore deposits; venti- 
lation; control and measurements of air currents; surface and under- 
ground haulage; compressed-air application. Prerequisite, mining en- 
gineering 1 or 68. Terrill. 

55. — Mining Hydraulics. Two hours credit. Either semester, T. Th., 
at 9. Theory of hydraulics, flow through orifices, tubes, and pipes; 
flow in conduits and rivers; measurement of water; hydraulic motors, 
pumps and hydraulic machinery; gravel deposits, drift mining, ground 
sluicing, hydraulic mining, river mining, dredging, and drainage. 

Grider. 

56. — Mine Plant and Mill Design I. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester. One lecture, Th., at 9, and three hours drafting, M., 1 to 4. 
Graphical statics, beams and trusses, building materials, foundations; 
calculations relating to machine parts, transmission of power by bands, 
riveted joints, etc.; elementary design of mine buildings, trestles, or 
bins, headframes, etc. Grider. 

57. — Mine Administration. One hour credit. Second semester, F., at 
8. Business management, mine accounts and cost sheets. Mine acci- 
dents, care of sick and injured. Sanitation of camps. Terrill. 

58. — Ore Dressing II. Four hours credit. Second semester. Two 
lectures, T. Th., at 11, and six hours laboratory, W. F., 1 to 4. Fine 



Description of Courses. 231 

crushing and screening machinery, sand and slime concentration, flota- 
tion, stamp milling, amalgamation, cyanidation, classification, regrind- 
ing, mill sampling, miscellaneous processes of separation, and accesssory 
apparatus. Required of students in metal mining. Grider. 

59. — Mine Examination and Reports. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester, T. Th., at 8. Sampling tools; sampling fissure veins, coal seams, 
placer deposits, tailings, mill products, gases, liquids, etc.; preparing 
samples for the assayer; recording assays, assay maps and surveys; 
underground, milling and metallurgical losses; estimating tonnage; mine 
examination and camp equipment; writing reports. Grider. 

60. — Professional Thesis. Two hours credit. This may be descrip- 
tion of a mining or metallurgical plant, or of a mining district, or may 
be work done in connection with course 63, or 66, or may be founded 
upon research work done at the University. Terrill, Grider. 

61. — Coal Mining I. Two hours credit. First semester, Tu. Th. 
Methods of working coal beds and handling coal. Properties of mine 
gases, safety lamps, explosives, ventilation, causes and prevention of ex- 
plosions. Terrill. 

62. — Coal Mining II. Three hours credit. Second semester, M. W. 
P., at 9. Systems and methods of working coal, extraction, haulage, 
hoisting, coal-cutting tools, coal cutting machinery, excavating machin- 
ery, mine cars and tracks etc.; surface plants. Prerequisite, mining en- 
gineering 1 and 61. Terrill. 

63. — Mine Plant and Mill Design II. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, 1 lecture, W. at 10, and 6 hours drafting, M. F., 1 to 4. For 
Senior and graduate students. Advanced course in design, construction 
and installation of mine plants, concentrating mills, machinery, head- 
frames, ore bins, dams, fans, foundations, tramways, flumes, sluices and 
pressure boxes. Preparation of working drawings, bills of materials, 
specifications and estimates. Prerequisite, mining engineering 56. 

Grider. 

64.— Mining Engineering. Three hours credit. First semester, M. 
W. F., at 9. The economic importance of geological irregularities affect- 
ing mine operations; mine maps; choosing methods and locating open- 
ings; theory of ventilation and compressed air; water supply; trans- 
portation; electricity as applied to mining; power problems; costs and 
conditions affecting costs. Prerequisites, mining engineering 54, and 
physics IE and 2E. - Grider. 

65. — Summer Work. Each candidate for a degree is required to give 
evidence of having had experience in some phase of mining work. This 
may be gained by an investigation of some mining district under the 
direction of an instructor for a period of six weeks, or by employment 
in mining work. 

66. — Advanced Ore Dressing III. Four hours credit. Both semes- 
ters, Senior or graduate students. Two lectures, T. Th., at 10, and 6 
hours laboratory work, T. Th., 1 to 4. Principles and schemes of mill 
processes. Adapting processes to specific ores, each student to choose 
one of the following for special study: flotation or other concentration 
method; amalgamation; cyanidation; chlorination ; chloridizing roast; or 
lixivation methods. Grider. 

67. — Mineral Land Survey. Two hours credit. First semester, 
Senior and graduate students. One lecture and one afternoon, (a) 
Mineral land surveying; mining claims, timber, coal and stone lands; 
dam, mill, tunnel, and reservoir sites; ditch, flume, and pipe lines; pre- 
paration and filing legal documents; duties of United States deputy min- 
eral surveyors, (b) Subdividing public lands, locating, relocating, and 
marking corners, making plats, reports, etc. Prerequisite, civil engineer- 
ing 1 and 2. Grider. 



232 School of Engineering. 

1 ™ 68 '~ Elements of Mining. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, M. W. F, at 11. Prospecting, boring, drilling, explosives (composi- 
tion, manufacture and uses), rock breaking (shaft sinking, tunneling, 
etc.), open pit mining, development, underground methods and support 
of mine workings. Required of students in mining. Open to Juniors 
and Seniors in the College and School of Engineering. Terrill. 

69.— Mining Geology. Two hours credit. First semester, T. Th., by 
appointment. Lithology: structure, texture, mineral and chemical com- 
position, and the manner of formation and occurrence of igneous, sedi- 
mentary, and metamorphic rocks. Effects of faulting, folding and in- 
trusion of igneous rocks. Geological problems confronting mining engi- 
neers. This course is adequate for all general field determinations and 
prospecting. Grider. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH. 

Professor : Hamilton. 
Instructor: Bond. 

Every student is required to engage in the physical exercise desig- 
nated by the proper medical authority of the University as suitable to his 
personal needs. Required work is arranged on the basis of three hours 
per week for freshmen and sophomores and two hours per week for all 
other students. 

All freshmen are required to take hygiene lectures ofle hour each 
week, as one of the three required hours. For outline of work offered, see 
Section III and Section XII. 

PHYSICS. 

Professor : Kestbr. 

Associate Professor: Rice (M. E.). 

Assistant Professors : Stimpson, Smith (T. T.). 

la. — General Physics. Five hours credit. First semester, four re- 
citations at; 11:30; two hours laboratory at assigned periods; second se- 
mester, four recitations at 10:30, two hours laboratory at assigned periods. 
A fundamental course of experimental lectures, recitations, and problems. 
Prerequisites, plane trigonometry and some knowledge of analytical ge- 
ometry and calculus. First semester, M. E. Rice and other instructors; 
second semester, E. F. Stimpson and other instructors. 

76. — General Physics. Five hours credit. Second semester, four 
recitations, at 11:30, two hours laboratory at assigned periods; first se- 
mester, four recitations, at 10:30, two hours laboratory at assigned pe- 
riods. A continuation of course IE. Second semester, M. E. Rice and 
other instructors; first semester, E. F. Stimpson and other instructors. 

52. — Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. Three hours credit. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 8. M. E. Rice. 

56a. — Electrical Measurements. One and one-half hours credit. 
First semester, three hours per week. M. Tu. of alternate weeks, 1 to 4. 
A laboratory course coordinate with 52. M. E. Rice. 

566 — Electrical Measurements. One and one-half hours credit. 
Second semester, three hours; M. Tu., of alternate weeks, at 1 to 4. 
Continuation of course 56a. M. E. Rice. 

For other courses in physics, see The College and The Graduate School. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

Instructors: Hess, Owens, Carman, Johns. 

1. — Elementary French I. Five hours credit. First semester, at 
10:30, 11:30, and 1:30. Grammar (Fraser and Squair), and easy read- 
ing. Drill in pronunciation, accidence, and easy syntax. 

Hess, Carman, Johns. 



Description of Courses. 233 

2. — Elementary French II. Five hours credit. Second semester, at 
10:30, 11:30, and 1:30. A continuation of course 1. Reading of simple 
prose texts, with exercises in dictation, elementary composition, and 
speaking. Hess, Carman. 

(Instead of taking course 3, engineering students should take course 
5. Those wishing course 4 may take it either semester in the College.) 

5. — Scientific French. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Translation of some scientific text. Reading and reports of 
current French scientific and technical periodicals. The aim of this 
course is to give the students a reading knowledge of the French lan- 
guage of science for practical, use in research work. Prerequisites, 
courses 1 and 2. Owens. 

For advanced courses in French, see The College. 

SPANISH. 

(See Hispanic Languages.) 
TECHNICAL REPORTS AND THESES. 

Special written reports are required from each student at certain times 
during his course of study, generally one in each semester of the Sopho- 
more year, one in the Junior year, and one in the Senior year. A stu- 
dent enrolled for technical report I, II, III, or IV confers with his in- 
structor for assignment of the subject on or before October 15 for the 
first semester, and on or before March 15 for the second semester. The 
finished reports must be in the instructors' hands by January 15 and 
May 15 of the respective semesters. Each report counts for one-half 
credit. 

A special thesis is required of each student before his graduation. (See 
''Thesis" in the description of courses of the professional departments.) 

Standard terms for the make-up of technical reports, theses, and other 
written papers are specified in an official circular to be had at the Dean's 
office. 

SUMMER WORK. 

In several of the courses of study practical work in one or two sum- 
mers is required. This work is not measured in terms of credit hours, al- 
though in fixing the requirements for graduation one or two additional 
credit hours are required in those courses of study which do not include 
summer work. 

INSPECTION TRIPS. 

As a valuable adjunct to resident study at the L T niversity, inspection 
trips to various engineering works are required to be taken by students 
with their instructors. Such trips may be made to large machine shops, 
power plants, steam or electric railways, lighting systems, city water- 
works, sewerage systems, industrial chemical plants, cement works, min- 
ing plants, or smelters. Architectural-engineering students are expected 
to visit important buildings in course of construction. These trips may 
be made during regular sessions of the school or during vacation. Par- 
ties sometimes travel as far as Chicago or St. Louis. The trips requir- 
ing absence from other work and those of considerable expenses are in- 
dicated in the programs of required courses of study. 



234 School of Engineering. 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION. 

STATION STAFF. 

Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

P. F. Walker, M. M. E. (Director), Mechanical Engineering. 

George C. Shaad, E. E., Electrical Engineering. 

Herbert A. Rice, C. E., Mechanics. 

Goldwin Goldsmith, Ph. B., Architectural Engineering. 

C. C. Williams, C. E., Civil Engineering. 

A. C. Terrill, E. M., Mining Engineering. 

F. B. Dains, Ph. D., Chemical Engineering. 

PURPOSES. 

This department of University activity has been established for two 
reasons; first, to correlate and group together in a more systematic way 
the results of scientific investigation than heretofore has been done under 
the various departments; second, to foster, enlarge, and direct this work, 
especially alpng lines of value to this state, and to supervise the pub- 
lication and distribution of the results of engineering and industrial 
research work. 

The work completed and published up to the present time has been 
done mainly by members of the teaching staff. It is described in detail 
in Section XII of the complete Catalog. Lists of all publications and 
of those soon to be issued are given. All communications relative to the 
station and its work should be addressed to the Director. 



SECTION V. 

School of Fine Arts. 

(235) 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., Chancellor of the University, and President of 
the Faculties. 

Harold L. Butler, A. B., Dean of the School of Fine Arts, and Pro- 
fessor of Voice. 

Charles G. Dunlap, Litt. D., Professor of English Literature. 

Carl A. Preyer, Mus. D., Associate Dean of the School of Fine Arts, and 
Professor of Piano and Composition. 

Edwin M. Hopkins, Ph. D., Professor of Rhetoric and English Lan- 
guage. 

William A. Griffith,* Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Eugenie Galloo, A. M., Professor of Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

Charles S. Skilton, A. B., Professor of Organ, History of Music, and 
Theory. 

James Naismith,* M. D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Elmer F. Engle, A. M., Professor of German. 

William B. Downing, Professor of Voice. 

Raphael D. O'Leary, A. B., Professor of English. 

Arthur Nevin, Professor of Choral Music, Ensemble, and Music Ex- 
tension. 

William M. Hekking, B. P., Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Frank E. Kendrie, A. M., Professor of Violin and Orchestral Playing. 

William V. Cahill, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Selden L. Whitcomb, A. M., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Louis E. Sisson, A. M., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

William S. Johnson, Ph. D., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Elise Neuen Schwander, Ph. D., Associate Professor of French. 

Edwin F. Stimpson, B. S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Harriet Greisinger, Mus. B., Assistant Professor of Piano. 

Anna Sweeney, Mus. B., Assistant Professor of Piano. 

John R. Frazier, Assistant Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Pearl Emley-Elliott, Mus. M., Assistant Professor of Piano and Organ. 

Maria L. Benson, A. B., Instructor in Design. 

J. C. McCanles, Instructor in Band Instruments. 

Maud Miller, Mus. B., Instructor in Piano. 

Cora I. Reynolds, Mus. B., Instructor in Voice. 

Gorden L. Cram, A. M., Instructor in Romance Language. 

William B. Dalton, Instructor in Cello. 

Minerva Hall, Instructor in Public School Music. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-'19. 

(237) 



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS, 



DEPARTMENTS. 

The School of Fine Arts is made up of the following departments: 
(1) Music; (2) Drawing and Painting. 

EQUIPMENT. 

In Music. In September, 1919, the music department of the School 
of Fine Arts will occupy the central portion of the Administration Build- 
ing, now in process of erection, where it will have an ample number of 
classrooms, practice rooms, and studios. The department has ten concert 
grand pianos and six upright pianos; a three-manual electric pipe organ, 
which has recently been rewired; a piano with organ pedals; charts for 
sight reading, and a Victrola with several hundred music records. 

In Drawing and Painting. The department of drawing and painting 
occupies the upper floor of the east wing of the Administration Building, 
where it has seven specially constructed, top-lighted studios. It has a 
complete equipment of the objects used in teaching drawing, design, and 
painting. In the Mining Building it has clay and porcelain mixers and 
kilns for the use of its students in modeling, design, and pottery. The 
Thayer Art Museum (see pages 42 and 43) is open to all art students. 

The Library. The University Library contains a large collection of 
works on art, including art exposition and criticism ; full sets of the classic 
and modern dramatic works, with many books on dramatic art and criti- 
cism; a large collection of vocal and orchestral scores of operas, oratorios 
and cantatas, biography, music history and criticism, symphonies and 
overtures, chamber music, ensemble music, pianoforte and organ music. 
These collections are annually increased. In addition each department 
has its departmental library. 

THE FACULTY. 

The professional faculty of the School of Fine Arts is made up of 
instructors who have had the advantage of the finest training to be 
secured in this country, and, in addition, many of them have had extended 
European training. Each one has had a large experience before the public 
— in concert, opera, oratorio, in dramatic work — and is able to give prac- 
tical advice to his students in these matters. No instructor with less than 
five years' teaching experience is engaged for the faculty, so students may 
be sure that they are in the hands of thoroughly experienced teachers. 
Many members of the faculty are authors, composers, and artists of rank 
and merit, their works having been issued by representative publishing 
houses. Each instructor is a specialist in his particular work, and rep- 
resents the best thought and method of modern pedagogy along that line. 

CURRICULA. 

Curricula Leading to Degrees. 

The curricula in the School of Fine Arts leading to degrees are as 
follows : 

Four-year courses in piano, voice, violin, organ, and composition, 
leading to the degree bachelor of music. 

A four-year course in drawing and painting, leading to the degree 
bachelor of painting. 

All candidates for a degree must spend at least two years in residence 
at the University. 

(239) 



240 School of Fine Arts. 

Curricula Leading to an Artist's Certificate. 

There are also four-year curricula in voice, piano, organ, violin, and 
drawing and painting, leading to an artist's certificate in these subjects. 

These curricula are designed to accommodate those students who are 
unable to meet the scholastic requirements of the regular courses in 
piano, voice, violin, organ, or drawing and painting; or those who do not 
wish to carry the studies in the College which are required of students 
in the courses leading to a degree; or those who wish to specialize with 
the idea of fitting themselves as teachers of the various subjects. 

For entrance to these courses twelve units of academic high-school 
work are required, and also the same musical requirements as for the 
degree courses. 

The studies demanded for the completion of these courses are the 
same as for the completion of the degree courses, omitting the studies 
in the College. 

Curricula Leading to a Teacher's Certificate. 

Three-year curricula in voice, piano, organ, violin, and drawing and 
painting lead to a teacher's certificate in these subjects. 

The three-year curricula are the same as the first three years of the 
artist's certificate curricula, with the same entrance requirements. Can- 
didates for the three-year teacher's certificate in piano or violin must 
present credits in one year of Teaching Materials in piano or violin, 
with one year of practice teaching. 

Public School Music — Public School Drawing. 

Two-year curricula in public-school music and in public-school draw- 
ing lead to certificates in these subjects. 

The two-year curricula are designed to prepare students as teachers 
of music or of drawing and painting in the grades and high schools 
of the state. The requirements for entrance are the same as for the 
College: viz., fifteen units of high-school work. 

Upon the completion of these courses the State Board of Education 
will issue a special state certificate entitling the holder thereof to teach 
music or drawing and painting in any of the grade or high schools of the 
state. 

ADMISSION. 

There are two methods of admission to the School of Fine Arts : First, 
by examination; second, by certificate. 

1. By Examination. 

Students who cannot present certificates from accredited high schools 
will be examined in the subjects required for entrance. The times and 
place of examination are set forth in the General Information section. 

2. By Certificate. 

Students will be admitted without examination on certificates from 
accredited high schools, or other recognized preparatory schools, signed 
by the proper school officer. 

Academic Requirements for Admission. 

For admission to the courses leading to the degrees bachelor of 
music or bachelor of painting, the requirements are the same as for 
admission to the College; viz., graduation from an accredited high 
school, or the completion of fifteen units of high-school work. 



Preparatory Piano Course. 241 

Additional Admission Requirements in Music. 

In Piano and Organ. Students desirous of taking piano or organ 
as a major must have completed the following preparatory piano course, 
intended to parallel the four years of high-school study, before admission 
to the Freshman class. 

Students who have nearly completed the course will be admitted with 
condition on recommendation of the head of the department. An ex- 
amination in fourth-year work is required. While the School of Fine 
Arts prefers this course of study, students who have been prepared with 
Lambert's or Mathews' Graded Studies, Mason's Touch and Technic, 
or other recognized methods, may offer them as a substitute. 

For the benefit of schools and teachers who may prepare students 
for entrance to the School of Fine Arts, this preparatory course is given 
in detail. It is not intended that all the material in this course should 
be covered by any one student. A small amount of material from each 
year, well done, is more acceptable than a large amount poorly done. 

The pieces given merely indicate the style and difficulty of the com- 
positions to be studied. They are intended to serve as a guide to the 
teacher in the selection of material. 

All or any part of this course may be studied in the School of Fine 
Arts, should the student be unable to secure adequate preparation else- 
where. 

Preparatory Piano Course, 
first year. 

Technic 

Correct position at the piano. 

Five finger exercises for developing strength and independence. 

Two principal touches — legato and staccato. 
Methods. 

One of the following: 

Lambert Pianoforte Method. 

Streland Elementary Material. % 

Lebert and Stark, Book 1. 

Piano methods of Kohler and Czerny. 

Russell, First Steps in Interpretation. 
(These methods to be used only long enough to prepare for the following 

material.) 
Technic. 

Mentor Crosse — Daily Exercises, Vol. 1 (John Church & Co.). 

Preparatory Scale Exercises. 
Studies. 

Select material from the following: 

Kohler — Op. 157 (for technical development). 

Duvernoy — Op. 17 (for technical development). 

Crosby-Adams — Four Wrist Studies. 

Burgmuller — Op. 100 (for phrasing, expression and rhythm). 

Concone — Op. 24 (for phrasing, expression and rhythm). 

Loeschhorn — Op. 65, Books 1 and 2. 
Pieces. 

By Ellsworth, Watson, Dutton, Crosby-Adams, Aldrich, Vincent, Gay- 
nor, etc. 
Objects of Study in the First Year. 

1. A correct position at the piano. 

2. Proper position at the wrist, hand and arm. 

3. Relaxation of hand and arm. 

4. 2-3-4-5 finger exercises, with well-curved, firm fingers. 

5. Legato and staccato touches. 

6. An understanding of the common musical terms. 

7. Proper method of phrasing. 

8. Methods of practice. 

9. Development of sense of rhythm. 
10. Memorizing. 

16— K. IL— 5419. 



242 School of Fine Arts. 

SECOND YEAR— FIRST SEMESTER. 
Tech Nic. 

Mentor Crosse, Vol. 2 (continued). 
Studies. 

Selected from the following: A 

Loeschhorn — Op. 65, Book 3 (for technical tie/vrelopment). 

Preyer — Ten Wrist Studies (for technical development). 

Heller — Op. 47 (for phrasing, expression and rhythm). 

Stamaty — Op. 37 (for phrasing, expression and rhythm). 
Pieces. 

Reinecke — Children's Songs, arr. Carrie Alchin. 

Von Wilm — Twelve Short Pieces. 

Gade — Op. 36, The Children's Christmas Eve. 

Friml — Op. 72, No. 3, Minuetto. 

MacDougall — Studies in Melody Playing. 

Preyer — Op. 38, Six Easy Pieces. 
SECOND YEAR — SECOND SEMESTER. 
Technic. 

Mentor Crosse, Vol. 2 (continued). 
Studies. 

Selected from the following: 

Lemoine — Op. 37 (for technical development). 

Loeschhorn — Op. 66, Book 2 (or technical development). 

Mayor — Pedal Studies at the Piano (or technical development). 

Bertini — Op. 29 (for phrasing, expression and rhythm). 

Bach for Beginners, Vincent (for phrasing, expression and rhythm). 
Pieces. 

Friml — Op. 79, No. 5, Contentment. 

Heller — A Curious Story. 

Kullak— Op. 62, Scenes from Childhood. 

Rogers — At the Spinning Wheel. 

Dennee — Tarantella. 

Rheinhold — Suite Mignonne. 

Hannah Smith — Five Plantation Dances (for rhythm). 

Emery — Brown Eyes. 

German — Henry VIII Dances (duet). 
Objects of Study in the Second Year. 

1. Simple major and minor scales. 

2. Easy wrist work in thirds and sixths. 

3. Development of melody touch. 

4. Simple studies in broken chords. 

5. Portamento touch. 

6. First pedal studies. 
THIRD YEAR — FIRST SEMESTER. 

Technic. 

Mentor Crosse, Vol. 3. 
Studies. 

* Selected from the following: 

Loeschhorn — Op. 66, Book 2. 

Heller — Op. 46. 

Preyer — Op. 44. 

Bach — Easy Preludes. 

Sonatinas by Clementi, Kuhlau, Dussek, etc. (Edition Steingraber, 
No. 19). 



Pieces. 



Grieg — Albumblatt, E. Minor. 

Lack — Idilio, Op. 134. 

Durand — Chaconne, Op. 62. 

Merkel — Spring Song, Op. 18, No. 1. 

Saar — Berceuse Mignonne. 

Moszkowski — Scherzino, Op. 18, No. 2. 

Raff— Fabliau, Op. 75, No. 2. 



Preparatory Piano Course. 243 



THIRD YEAR— SECOND SEMESTER. 
Technic. 
f Mentor Crosse, Vol. 3 (continued). 

Studies. $ 

Selected Sroin the following: 

Loeschhorn — Op. 66, Book 3. 

Krause — Op. 15, Ten Studies for the Left Hand. 

Krause — Op. 2, Trill Studies. 

Perry — Wrist Studies. 

Bach — Easy Preludes (continued). 

Sonatinas by Clementi, Kuhllau, Dusseck, etc. (continued). 

Grieg — Op. 12, Lyrical Pieces, Schumann Album for the Young. 
Pieces. 

Lack — Le Chant du Ruisseau, Op. 92. 

Scharwenka, Ph. — Moment Musicale, A Major. 

Mildenberg — Arabian Night. 

Sternberg — Historiette Musicale, Op. 50, No. 2. 

Rimsky — Korsakoff-Novellette, Op. 12, No. 2. 

Bendel — Spinning Song. 
Object op Study in the Third Year. 

1. Study of chord playing. 

2. A, B, C major, minor and chromatic scales. 

3. Triad arpeggios and their inversions. 

4. Rhythms of 2 against 3. 

5. Trill exercises. 
FOURTH YEAR— FIRST SEMESTER. 

Technic. 

Mentor Crosse, Vol. 4. 
Studies. 

Selected from the following: 

Heller— Op. 45. 

Czerny — Op. 299, Book 1 and 2. 

August Hoffman — Left-hand Studies (after Bertini). 

Loeschhorn — Op. 67, Book 1. 

Bach — The Easy Two-part Inventions. 
Sonatas. 

Mozart — No. 1, C Major. 

Haydn — No. 5, C Major. 

Beethoven — Op. 49, Nos. 1 and 2. 
Pieces. 

Whiting — La Fileuse. 

Chaminade — Air de Ballet, Op. 30, No. 1. 

Godard — Novelloza, Op. 47. 

Godard — Au Matin, Op. 83. 

Rheinberger — Ballade in G Minor. 

Grieg — Papillon, Op. 43, No. 1. 

Jensen — Will o' the Wisp. 

Moszkowski — Polonaise, Op. 18, No. 5. 

Schuett — Etude Mignonne, Op. 16. 
FOURTH YEAR— SECOND SEMESTER. 
Technic. 

The Little Pischna. 



Studies. 



Sonatas. 



Czerny — Op. 299, Book 3 and 4. 

Bach — Two-part Inventions (continued). 

Mozart — No. 4, in F. 

Hollander, Alex. — Intermezzi for the Left Hand, Op. 31. 

Haydn — No. 7, in D Major. 

Beethoven — Op. 14, No. 1 and 2. 



244 School of Fine Arts. 

Pieces. 

Scharwenka — Staccato Etude, Op. 40. 

Grieg — Op. 40, No. 5. 

Preyer — Dialogue Without Words. 

Dubois — Scherzo et Choral. 

Liebling — Serenade, Op. 34. 

Saint-Saens — The Swan (Kunkel edition). 

Debussy — Arabesque, No. 2. in G Major. 

Hoffman — Polonaise, Op. 55, No. "3. 
Objects of Study in the Fourth Year. 

1. Scales in sixths and tenths. 

2. Dominant and diminished seventh arpeggios and their inversions. 

3. Octave exercises. 

4. Study of embellishments. 

5. Independence of fingers developed through polyphonic playing. 

Entrance Requirements in Voice. 

Students desirous of studying voice as a major subject must have com- 
pleted at least one year of the following two-year preparatory vocal 
course before admission to the Freshman year. As the study of voice 
cannot properly be carried on without knowledge of the piano, the can- 
didate for admission must have completed at least one year of the four- 
year preparatory piano course outlined on page 7. 

Preparatory Vocal Course. 

first year. 

The Object of Study. 

1. A proper position of the head and body. 

2. A systematic control of the breath. 

3. A proper method of tone attack. 

4. A proper method of tone release. 

5. Correct tone placement through the medium range of the voice. 

6. A correct method of sustained and legato singing. 

7. Development of an even scale. 

8. A proper use of the pure vowels. 

9. Correct pronunciation and distinct enunciation in singing English. 
10. Simple songs in English. 

Material Used May be Selected from — 

Sieber — 36 Measure Vocalises, for all Voices. 

Clippinger — Systematic Voice Training. 

Behnke and Pearce — Voice Training. 

Marzo — Art of Vocalization — Preparatory Course. 

Shakespeare — Vocal Method. 

Simple Songs in English. 
SECOND YEAR. 

Objects of Study. 

1. A continuation of work in the first year, with special emphasis on 

proper breath control. 

2. Primary work in agility. 

3. Voice extension. 

4. Staccato and semistaccato. 

5. Long and short vowels. 

6. Short scales and arpeggios. 

7. Simple songs in English. 

Material to be Used May be Selected from the List Above, and from — 
Concone — Op. 50. 
Bordogni — Exercises for Agility. 
Marzo — Art of Vocalization, Book 1. 
Spicker — Masterpieces of Vocalization, Book 1. 
Songs, by Schubert and other standard composers, in English. 



Preparatory Violin Course. 



245 



Entrance Requirements in Violin. 

Students desirous of studying the violin as a major must have com- 
pleted the following preparatory course, intended to parallel three 
years of high-school study, before admission to the Freshman year. For 
the benefit of schools or teachers who may prepare students for entrance 
to the School of Fine Arts, this course is given in detail. It is not in- 
tended that all the material in the course should be covered by any one 
student. A small amount of material, from each year, well done, is more 
acceptable than a large amount poorly done. Students who have nearly 
completed the course will be admitted with a condition on recommenda- 
tion of the head of the department. 

All or any part of this course may be studied in the School of Fine 
Arts, should the student be unable to secure adequate preparation else- 
where. 

Preparatory Violin Course, 
first year. 

Objects of Study. 

1. Correct position of holding violin. 

2. Correct position of wrist, hand and fingers of left hand. 

3. Correct position of arm, hand and fingers of right hand. 

4. Exercise for legato, full-bow staccato and half-bow staccato. 

5. Understanding common musical terms. 

6. Methods of practice. 

7. Development of sense of rhythm. 

8. Memorizing. 
Studies. 

Laoureux — Book I. 

Kelly— Book I. 

Sevcik — Violin Technic, Op. 1, Part I. 

Dancla — Ecole de Mechanism. 

Gordon — Formation Studies for the Violin, Book I. 
Solos. 

Philip Mittell — Graded Course, Vol. I. 

Pleyel — Duet, Op. 8. 

Twenty-five Pieces in the First Position (Schirmer edition). 

The Violinist's Album, Vols. I, II, III (Augener edition). 

Kendrie — Four Elementary Studies. 
SECOND YEAR. 

Objects op Study. 

Continuation of the first year: 

1. Study of scale construction. 

2. Exercises for flexibility of bow, arm and wrist. 

3. Development of Martele bowing. 

4. Development of left wrist and arm for shifting. 



Studies. 



Solos. 



Laoureux — Books II, III, IV. 

Dancla — Book II. 

Schubert — Book II. 

Sevcik — Op. 8. 

Wohlfahrt — Op. 75, Book II. 

Kayser — Book II. 

Sitt or Schradieck — Scale studies. 

Philip Mittell — Graded Course, Vol. II. 

Seitz — Classical sonatinas of Beethoven and Clementi (B. M. Co. ed.). 

Solos by Dancla, Thome, Bohm, together with transcriptions of the 

smaller compositions of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Wagner and 

Humperdinck. 



246 School of Fine Arts. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Objects of Study. 

Continuation of the second year : 

1. Three-octave scale. 

2. Spiccato, slurred staccato bowing. 

3. Chords, double-stopping and arpeggios. 
Studies. 



Solos. 



Mazas — Books I and II. 

Kayser — Books II and III. 

Sevcik — Scale Studies and Double-stopping. 

Alard — Scales. 

Dout — Preparatory Studies. 

Solos by Drdla, Wieniawski, de Beriot. 
Concertos by Seitz, Accolay and Viotti. 
Violin Classics, Vols. I to V, Schirmer. 

Entrance Examinations. 

Owing to the fact that students are generally out of practice during 
the summer, entrance examinations in the above work can be taken any 
time up to October 1. Students intending to enter should write the Dean 
of the School of Fine Arts about September 1, signifying such intention 
and arranging for interviews with the heads of the various departments. 

Special Students. 

All persons who desire to pursue a special line of work, without con- 
forming to the requirements for entrance or following a prescribed 
course, may apply for admission as special students to the Dean of the 
School of Fine Arts. The Dean's certificate of acceptance must be pre- 
sented to the Registrar before registration. 

Special students desiring credit toward a degree or a certificate are 
subject to the same regulations as regular students as to the quality of 
work, attendance at recitals and examinations. Nonresident special stu- 
dents who are not regularly enrolled in some other school of the Uni- 
versity will be expected to carry not less than ten hours work, of which, 
in the case of music students, there must be two hours of theory. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

Credit for work of collegiate or professional standing is granted only 
on recommendation of the Advance? Standing Committee. 

For regulations governing the granting of such credit, see "Admission 
to Advance Standing," Section I, General Catalog, page 49. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission having certificates from accredited 
schools, and all students of the University intending to pursue their 
studies during the ensuing year must present themselves for registration 
at the University on September 15, 16, 17. Registration at a later date 
will be permitted only on the payment of a fee of one dollar. 

ENROLLMENT. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar and after 
fees have been paid, students should apply to the Dean for enrollment in 
their classes. Enrollment the first semester occurs September 16, 17, and 
on the first day of the second semester. Enrollment at a later date 
will be permitted only on the payment of a fee of one dollar. 



General. 247 

special courses. 

Ensemble. 

Ensemble classes meet throughout the Sophomore and Junior years 
of the piano, organ, and violin courses. The first year is given over to 
four- and eight-hand music for one and two pianos. Standard sym- 
phonies and overtures and various modern pieces are studied. The sec- 
ond year is given over to playing with the strings, studying the standard 
trios, quartets and quintets. Violin students remain in the second-year 
class for two years, as there is no repetition of material used. Two years 
of ensemble are required of all piano, organ, and violin students who are 
candidates for a degree or a certificate. 

Teaching Materials — Piano, Violin. 

These courses are designed to aid piano and violin students in grasp- 
ing the principles and methods of teaching these instruments. A 
thorough review of the materials — exercises, studies, and pieces — used in 
a thorough and well-graded course for these instruments, together with 
the best and most modern methods of presenting these materials to 
pupils of all ages. Actual practice in teaching is gained by teaching be- 
ginning and intermediate pupils under the guidance of instructors. One 
year of teaching materials is required of all piano or violin students who 
are candidates for a three-year teacher's certificate in either piano or 
violin. 

Music History. 

The Fine Arts course in Music History occupies two hours for the 
Sophomore year and two hours for the Junior year. One of the features 
of the course is the great mass of illustrative material used, by which 
the student hears the music performed and has ample opportunity of 
studying it from the tonal standpoint. 

Sight Singing, Ean Training and Dictation. 

This is a course necessary for the full development of the modern 
music student. One year of this work is required of all Freshmen stu- 
dents in the degree courses, and two years of all public school music 
students. Advanced students are advised to repeat it until proficient. 

GENERAL. 

The Thayer Art Museum. 

Through the generosity of Mrs. William B. Thayer, of Kansas City, 
Mo., the University has an art collection that is of unusual value to art 
students. It was made with this end in view and illustrates the develop- 
ment of design in textiles, ceramics, glassware, and costumes. There 
are a number of important paintings of the American school, Chinese 
and Japanese paintings, and 1,200 Japanese prints of exceptional merit. 
There are about 9,000 items in the collection, the most important being 
textiles, of which there are examples of Coptic and Byzantium textiles, 
Venetian embroidery of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Chinese 
tapestries of the Ming period, Chinese embroideries, Indian and Persian 
shawls and rugs, a large collection of Paisley shawls and American 
counterpanes. In Chinese art, the collection is rich in cameo glass, 
ceramics, and jade articles, over 100 being snuff bottles. In Japanese 
art objects are many inros, nitsukis, and combs done in carved ivory 
and lacquer; bronze castings; swords and sword guards; cloisonne, and 
ceramics. 

The following well-known American painters are represented by 
important examples of their work: George Innes, J. S. Murphy, Wins- 



248 School of Fine Arts. 

low Homer, Homer Martin, Paul Dougherty, Emil Carlsen, Richard 
Miller, Jonas Lie and Robert Henri. 

The following European painters are represented: Joseph Isreals, 
Mesdag and Sarolla Bastida. 

There came with the Thayer collection about a thousand books upon 
art topics. The University has recently purchased the F. 0. Marvin 
art library. These collections, added to the 3,500 books on art already 
in the University library, make it one of the largest and most valuable 
art libraries in the West. All are available to the student of art. 

Concerts and Recitals. 

The University supports a course of eight concerts by artists of the 
highest rank. All fine arts music students are admitted to these con- 
certs free of charge. 

Public recitals and concerts are given frequently in Fraser Hall by 
members of the Faculty and by advanced students. 

Recitals are given weekly by the students of the school, at which 
works studied in the classroom are performed before a small audience 
of fellow students and friends. All music students are required to at- 
tend these recitals and all concerts, to take part in the programs at 
least twice a year, and to present each semester a record of attendance. 
These semipublic appearances are of great assistance in enabling the 
student to acquire the ease and self-possession so essential to a suc- 
cessful public performance. 

Art Exhibitions. 

Frequent exhibitions of works of art are held at the University, 
together with a course of lectures upon subjects related to the fine 
arts. At the close of the year there is held an exhibition of work done 
by pupils of the department of drawing and painting. 

University Chorus. 

The University Chorus, of 100 voices, is supported wholly by the 
University, although many townspeople are members. Only the finest 
choral works are studied, and two concerts are given annually. Weekly 
rehearsals are held in Fraser Hall. During the four years of the de- 
gree course thorough knowledge of at least eight great choral works is 
gained. In addition, many fine miscellaneous choruses are performed. 

University Orchestra. 

The University supports an orchestra, made up of students and 
amateur musicians from the city. Weekly rehearsals are held and two 
concerts are given annually. The orchestra is also used in the per- 
formance of concertos for the various solo instruments, and in playing 
the accompaniments for the choral works sung by the University Chorus. 

University Band. 

The University Band of 70 pieces is made up wholly of University 
students. It rehearses weekly and gives two annual concerts. 

Glee Clubs. 

A Men's Glee Club and a Women's Glee Club, conducted by the Di- 
rector of the vocal department give opportunity for the study and per- 
formance of the standard and lighter compositions for men's and 
women's voices. Each club gives an annual concert, and the Men's Glee 
Club makes a trip during the hoHdays. 



Expenses. 249 

Scholarships. 

Senator Arthur Capper has given a scholarship in the sum of $50. 
It is open to Freshman students in the School of Fine Arts. Held in 
1918-'19 by Lorna Marie Raub. 

Pianos for Practice. 

The School of Fine Arts will have eleven practice rooms ready by 
September, 1919. A moderate fee to cover tuning and deterioration will 
be charged for the use of the pianos in these rooms. Instruments can 
be rented in town for from three to five dollars a month, and grand 
pianofortes at from seven to ten dollars a month. Pianos rented of 
private persons may often be secured at even lower rates. Several stu- 
dents sometimes unite in renting an instrument, thus materially reducing 
the expense. 

EXPENSES. 

By legislative enactment, a matriculation fee of five dollars (to be 
paid but once) must be charged each student of Kansas entering any of 
the regular courses of the School of Fine Arts. Nonresidents of Kansas 
must pay a matriculation fee of ten dollars. Special students do not pay 
a matriculation fee. 

The instructors in the School of Fine Arts receive compensation from 
the state for part of the work of the courses ; the remainder must be paid 
for at rates indicated below. 

If the student withdraws before the middle of the quarter, one-half 
of the tuition fee will be refunded. Should he withdraw after the mid- 
dle of the quarter, no part of the tuition fee will be refunded. Should 
the student be withdrawn at any time on account of unsatisfactory work, 
no part of the tuition fee will be refunded. Only special students receive 
lessons during the week of the semiannual examinations. 

All bills are payable quarterly in advance, and enrollment in classes 
will be permitted only upon the presentation of the treasurer's receipt 
for the quarter's tuition. 

Rates for Regular Students. 

The following rates are for the quarter of nine weeks, and with the 
exception of the work in public-school music or drawing and painting, 
are based on two half -hour private lessons a week in the major study, to- 
gether with class work in harmony, music history, technic, sight sing- 
ing and ear training, and all studies in the College or the School of Edu- 
cation. 

First year. . .Piano, per quarter: f- 

Lessons with Miss Greisinger, Miss Sweeney, Mrs. 

Emley-Elliott or Miss Miller $27.50 

Voice, per quarter, lessons with Miss Reynolds 27.50 

Voice, per quarter, with other teachers 33 . 50 

Violin, per quarter 27.50 

Drawing and painting, per quarter 15.00 

Public-school drawing, per quarter 10.00 

Public-school music, per quarter 10.00 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

Seconq" year. .Rates the same as for the first year. 
Third year. . .Piano, per quarter: 

Two a week with Prof. Preyer $40.00 

One a week with Prof. Preyer and one with as- 
sistant 33 . 50 

Organ, per quarter 33 . 50 

Voice, per quarter 33.50 



250 School of Fine Arts. 

Violin, per quarter $33 . 50 

Painting, per quarter 15 . 00 

Fourth year. .All courses leading to degrees, free to Kansas stu- 
dents. 

To receive free tuition in the fourth year, students 
must be of full Senior rank in all required sub- 
jects and must have been in attendance at the 
School of Fine Arts for at least two years. 

For nonresidents the same as for the third year. 

For all certificate courses the same as for the 
third year. 

Rates'for Special Students. 

The following rates are for the quarter of nine weeks, and cover only 
the subjects given: 

Piano with Prof. Preyer, two a week $36 . 00 

Piano with Prof. Preyer, one a week 20.00 

Piano with Miss Greisinger, Miss Sweeney, or Mrs. Emley-El- 

liott, two a week 21 . 00 

Piano with Miss Greisinger, Miss Sweeney, or Mrs. Emley-El- 

liott, one a week '. . 11 . 00 

Piano with Miss Miller, two a week 17 . 00 

Piano with Miss Miller, one a week ^ 9 . 00 

Voice with Dean Butler or Prof. Downing, two a week 36.00 

Voice with Dean Butler or Prof. Downing, one a week 20 . 00 

Voice with Miss Reynolds, two a week 19 . 00 

Voice with Miss Reynolds, one a week 10 . 00 

Organ with Prof. Skilton, two a week 36.00 

Organ with Prof. Skilton, one a week 20 . 00 

Organ with Mrs. Emley-Elliott, two a week 21 . 00 

Organ with Mrs. Emley-Elliott, one a week 11 .00 

Violin with Prof. Kendrie, two a week 27 . 50 

Violin with Prof. Kendrie, one a week 15.00 

Harmony, counterpoint, composition, in class, two a week 10.00 

Harmony, counterpoint, composition, instrumentation, with Pro- 
fessor Skilton, two a week, privately 36.00 

Harmony, counterpoint, composition, instrumentation, with Pro- 
fessor Skilton, one a week, privately 20.00 

Sight singing, ear training and dictation, two a week, in class. . . 5.00 

Ensemble, in class 3 . 00 

Technic, in class 5 . 00 

Public-school music courses, in class • 10 . 00 

(Private lessons subject to special fees.) 

Public-school music courses, in class (to students already enrolled 

in another regular music course) 5 . 00 

Teaching materials, piano (with practice teaching) 3.00 

Teaching materials, violin (with practice teaching) 3.00 

Violin in class for public-school music students 3 . 00 

Rent of violin, bow and case 1 . 50 

Drawing and painting, in class 15 . 00 

Drawing and painting, in class (part time) 7.50 

Public-school drawing and painting, in class 10.00 

Design, in class 15 . 00 

Design, in class (part time) 7 . 50 



School of Fine Arts. 251 



CURRICULUM. 



In September, 1916, all courses of study in the School of Fine Arts 
were arranged on the basis of 120 semester hours for graduation. 
Students entering the school, then or thereafter, must, before graduation, 
present credits in all required subjects and enough additional credits in 
elective subjects to make up the sum of 120 semester hours. Other 
elective subjects than those given in the following curriculum may be 
offered for credit, by arrangement with the Dean. 

MAJOR AND ELECTIVE SUBJECTS. 

Each regular music student working toward a degree or a certificate 
must carry a major subject in applied music — piano, voice, organ or 
violin — or a major subject in theoretical music — composition or public- 
school music. The student may also carry an elective subject in applied 
music, for which credit will be allowed as follows: piano, organ or 
violin, once a week, two hours credit per semester; twice a week, four 
hours credit per semester; voice, once a week, one and one-half hours 
credit per semester; twice a week, three hours credit per semester. 
Credit for the elective subject in music may be secured without regard 
to the student's previous study in this subject, with exception of regu- 
lar vocal students, who must have completed one year of the preparatory 
piano course outlined on page 241 before credit can be secured for piano 
study. 

COMBINATION COURSES. 

Piano or violin students in the diploma courses may receive a teacher's 
certificate also, by completing one year of teaching materials in piano or 
violin, with practice teaching. 

Piano, vocal, or violin students in the diploma courses may receive a 
certificate in public-school music also, by taking, during each semester of 
the four-year course, one additional subject from the public-school music 
course. 

Art students in the diploma course may receive a certificate in public- 
school art also, by completing the eight hours of normal methods and nine 
hours of educational subjects. 

Certificates in both public-school music and public-school art may be 
secured by study during three years and one six-weeks summer session. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

During the first semester every Freshman must attend a weekly 
lecture on hygiene, and spend two hours a week in the gymnasium. Dur- 
ing the second semester he must spend two hours a week in the 
gymnasium. 

During the entire year every Sophomore must spend two hours a week 
in the gymnasium. 

For piano students special work in hand, arm, and shoulder relaxa- 
tion is arranged for. 

Vocal students receive special work designed to increase and strengthen 
breath control. 

For public-school music students special classes in folk dancing are 
arranged. 



252 School of Fine Arts. 

pianoforte. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

During the first two years, piano students take their lessons from an 
assistant. Exceptions are sometimes made when students are willing 
to pay the Junior tuition rate, and Professor Preyer has time to accom- 
modate them. Students who wish to receive a teacher's certificate in 
piano must during their course of study complete one year of piano 
Teaching Materials, with practice teaching. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Semester: Hours credit. 

Piano 1, twice a week 5 

Piano 9 (Technic) 1 

Musical Theory 1 (Harmony) . Kendrie 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 1. Hall 1 

Recitals 1 1 

Rhetoric 1 (The College) 3 

Physical Education 20 (Hygiene) 1 

Exercise (two hours each week). 

Second Semester: 

Piano 2, twice a week 5 

Piano 10 (Technic) . Miller 1 

Musical Theory 2 (Harmony) . Kendrie 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 2. Hall 1 

Recitals 2 1 

Rhetoric 2 (The College) 2 

Physical Education. 

Elective: Voice, Violin, Public-school Music, Modern Languages, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Semester: 

Piano 3, twice a week 5 

Piano 11 (Technic) . Miller 1 

Musical Theory 3 (Harmony). Skilton 2 

History of Music 1. Skilton 2 

English 10 (The College) 2 

Ensemble 1 (Pianoforte Ensemble) . Nevin 1 

Recitals 3 . 1 

Physical Education. 

Elective: Voice, Violin, Public-school Music, Modern Languages, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

Second Semester: 

Piano 4, twice a week 5 

Piano 12 (Technic) . Miller 1 

Musical Theory 4 ( Harmony) . Skilton 2 

History of Music 2. Skilton 2 

English 11 (The College) 3 

Ensemble 2 (Pianoforte Ensemble) . Nevin 1 

Recitals 4 1 

Physical Education. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Semester: Hours credit. 

Piano 5, twice a week. Preyer 6 

Musical Theory 5 (Counterpoint) . Preyer 2 

History of Music 3. Skilton 2 

Musical Theory 7 (Composition). Skilton. 1 

Ensemble 3 (String Ensemble). Nevin. 1 

Recitals 5 1 

Elective: English 12, Modern Languages, Voice, Violin, Organ, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 



Courses of Study. 253 

Second Semester: 

Piano 6, twice a week. Preyer 6 

Musical Theory G (Counterpoint) . Preyer 2 

Musical Theory 8 (Composition) . Skilton 1 

History of Music 4. Skilton 2 

Ensemble 4 ( String Ensemble) . Nevin 1 

Recitals 6 1 

Acoustics, twice a week for ten weeks. Stimpson 1 

Elective: English 14, Modern Languages, Voice, Violin, etc 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester: 

Piano 7, twice a week. Preyer 7 

Musical Theory 11 (Instrumentation) . Nevin 1 

Musical Theory 15 (Canon and Fugue) . Skilton : 1 

Recitals 7 1 

Thesis 1 1 

Electives : 

Musical Theory 9 (Composition). Skilton 1 

Musical Theory 13 (Form and Analysis) . Skilton 1 

(Required of students who did not take Composition in the 
junior year.) 
Other electives as in previous years. 

Second Semester: 

Piano 8, twice a week. Preyer 8 

Musical Theory 12 (Instrumentation). Nevin 1 

Recitals 8 1 

Thesis 2 1 

Electives : 

Musical Theory 9 (Composition). Skilton • 1 

Musical Theory 14 (Form and Analysis). Skilton 1 

(Required of students who did not take Composition in the 
junior year.) 
Other electives as in previous years. 

ORGAN. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

Three-year course, open to those who have completed the work of the 
Freshman year in piano. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

For the Sophomore year the courses of study are the same as for the 
Sophomore year in piano, substituting organ 1 and 2 for piano 3 and 4. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Semester: Hours credit. 

Organ 3, twice a week. Skilton 5 

Organ 8, once a week. Skilton 1 

Musical Theory 5 (Counterpoint) . Preyer 2 

Musical Theory 7 (Composition) . Skilton 1 

History of Music 3. Skilton 2 

Ensemble 3 (String Ensemble) . Nevin 1 

Recitals 5 1 

Elective: English 12, Modern Language, Voice, Piano, Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 



254 School of Fine Arts. 

Second Semester: 

Organ 4, twice a week. Skilton 5 

Organ 9, once a week. Skilton ......... 1 

Musical Theory 6 (Counterpoint). Preyer 2 

Musical Theory 8 (Composition) . Skilton . . . . . 1 

History of Music 4. Skilton 2 

Ensemble 4 (String Ensemble) . Nevin 1 

Recitals 6 1 

Elective: English 14, Modern Languages, Voice, Piano, Violin', etc. 

(Private lessons are suBject to fees.) 
SENIOR YEAR. 

For the Senior year the courses of study are the same as for the 
Senior year in piano, substituting organ 5 and 6 for piano 7 and 8, and 
adding organ 7 (Church Music) in the first semester. 

VIOLIN. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

The courses of study in violin are the same as for the regular course 
in piano, except that violin 1 to 8 are substituted for piano 1 to 8, and 
orchestra 1 to 4 for piano 9 to 12. 

Violin students are required to play in the University Orchestra dur- 
ing the four years of the course, unless excused by the Dean, on recom- 
mendation of the conductor. One hour credit each semester is allowed 
for orchestral playing. 

Violin students remain in the String Ensemble classes for two years, 
receiving one hour credit each semester. 

Violin students should be able to play simple piano accompaniments. 
Any deficiency in this respect must be made up before graduation. 

VIOLONCELLO. 

These courses are the same as the first two years of the course in 
violin, except that violoncello 1 to 4 take the place of violin 1 to 4. 
Violoncello students should be able to play simple piano accompaniments, 
or make up the deficiency by private lessons. 

Violoncello students are required to play in the University Orchestra 
during their entire course, unless excused by the Dean, on recommenda- 
tion of the instructor. One hour credit per semester is allowed for 
Orchestral Playing. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

Students in the regular course in voice should be able to play accom- 
paniments of moderate difficulty. Any deficiency in this respect must be 
made up by private lessons before entering the Junior year. 

Vocal students should take French 1 and 2 in the Junior or Senior 
year. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Semester: Hours credit. 

Voice Culture 1, twice a week 3 

Musical Theory 1 (Harmony) . Kendrie 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 1. Hall 1 

Recitals 1 1 

Rhetoric 1 (The College) 3 

Italian 1 (The College) 3 

Physical Education 20 (Hygiene) 1 



Courses of Study. 255 

Second Semester: 

Vocal Culture 2, twice a week 3 

Musical Theory 2 (Harmony) . Kendrie 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 2. Hall 1 

Recitals 2 1 

Rhetoric 2 (The College) 2 

Italian 2 (The College) 3 

Physical Education. 

Elective : Piano, Public-school Music, Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester: 

Vocal Culture 3, twice a week 3 

Musical Theory 3 (Harmony) . Skilton 2 

History of Music 1. Skilton 2 

English 11 (The College) 2 

German 1 ( Fine Arts) .♦ 3 

Recitals 3 1 

Chorus 1. Nevin 1 

Physical Education. 

Elective : Piano, Public-school Music, Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

Second Semester: 

Vocal Culture 4, twice a week 3 

Musical Theory 4 (Harmony) . Skilton 2 

History of Music 2. Skilton 2 

English 12 (The College) 3' 

German 2 (Fine Arts) . . 3 

Recitals 4 1 

Chorus 2. Nevin 1 

Physical Education. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Semester: 

Vocal Culture 5, twice a week 4 

Musical Theory 5 (Counterpoint) . Preyer ; 2 

Musical Theory 7 (Composition) . Skilton 1 

History of Music 3. Skilton 2 

Recitals 5 1 

Chorus 3. Nevin 1 

Elective: French 1, English 12, Piano, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
First Semester: Hours credit. 

Vocal Culture 6, twice a week 4 

Musical Theory 6 (Counterpoint) . Preyer 2 

Musical Theory 8 (Composition) . Skilton 1 

History of Music 4. Skilton 2 

Recitals 6 1 

Chorus 4. Nevin 1 

Elective: French 2, English 14, Piano, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
SENIOR YEAR. 

First Semester: 

Vocal Culture 7, twice a week 5 

Musical Theory 11 (Instrumentation) . Nevin 

Musical Theory 15 (Canon and Fugue) . Skilton 

Recitals 7 

Chorus 5. Nevin 

Thesis 1 , 



256 School of Fine Arts. 

Electives : 

Musical Theory 9 (Composition) . Skilton 1 

Musical Theory 13 (Form and Analysis) . Skilton 1 

(Required of students who did not take Composition in the 
Junior year.) 
Modern Languages, Piano, Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

Second Semester: 

Vocal Culture 8, twice a week 5 

Musical Theory 12 (Instrumentation) . Nevin 1 

Recitals 8 I 

Thesis 2 1 

Chorus 6. Nevin 1 

Electives : 

Musical Theory 9 (Composition) . Skilton 1 

Musical Theory 14 (Form and Analysis) . Skilton 1 

(Required of students who did not take Composition in the 
Junior year.) 
Modern Languages, Piano, Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Painting. 

Students in drawing and painting are required to furnish their own 
materials, except easels. 

All art- work, when finished, is under the control of the instructors 
until after the close of the public exhibition of student work, at the 
end of the academic year. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Second Semester: Hours credit. 

Drawing 1. Frazier 5 

Drawing 13a (Composition) . Hekking 2 

Drawing 19 (Artistic Anatomy) . Frazier 2 

Drawing 17 (Perspective) . Benson 2 

English 10 (The College) 2 

Rhetoric I (The College) 3 

Physical Education 20 (Hygiene) 1 

Second Semester: 

Drawing 2. Frazier .5 

Drawing 28 (Design). Benson 2 

Drawing 136 (Composition) . Hekking 2 

English 11 (The College) 3 

Rhetoric 2 (The College) 2 

Physical Education. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Semester: 

Drawing 3 (Life Class) . Hekking 5 

Drawing 29 (Design). Benson 2 

Drawing 14a (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 1 

Drawing 25 (History of Painting) . Griffith, Hekking 2 

Drawing 5 (Painting) . Griffith, Cahill 2 

Physical Education. 

Elective: Three hours, selected from English 12, French 1 and 2, 

German 1 and 2, Spanish 1 and 2, Philosophy 1 and 2, Zoology 1, 

and History 1. 



Courses of Study. 257 

Second Semester: 

Drawing 6. Hekking 5 

Drawing 7 or 30. Griffith or Benson 2 

Drawing 146 (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 2 

Drawing 26 (American Painting) . Griffith 2 

Physical Education. 

Elective: Three hours selected from English 12, French, German, 
Spanish, Philosophy, or History. 

First Semester: junior year. 

(For students of Painting.) 

Drawing 8 or 9 (Painting). Griffith, Hekking, Cahill 5 

Drawing 20 (Advanced Artistic Anatomy). Hekking 2 

Drawing 21 (Sketch Class). Hekking, Cahill 2 

Drawing 15a (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 1 

Elective: Five hours in the College, selected from English 50, 
French, German, Spanish, History or Greek Architecture 61. 
(For students of Design.) 

Drawing 8. Hekking 5 

Drawing 31 (Design) . Benson 5 

Greek Architecture 61. (The College) 2 

Elective: Three hours selected from the above list. 

Second Semester: 

(For students of Painting.) 

Drawing 10 (Painting) . Griffith, Hekking 5 

Drawing 156 (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 3 

Drawing 27 (Art Criticism) . Hekking 2 

Drawing 22 (Sketch Class) . Hekking, Cahill 2 

Elective: Three hours, as in the first semester. 

(For students of Design.) 

Drawing 32 (Design) . Benson 5 

Drawing 156 (Composition) . . Hekking, Cahill 3 

Drawing 27 (Art Criticism) . Hekking 2 

Greek Sculpture and Painting. (The College) 2 

Elective : Three hours, as in the first semester. 

First Semester : senior year. 

(For students of Painting.) 

Drawing 11. Griffith, Hekking 5 

Drawing 16a (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 5 

Drawing 23 (Sketch Class) . Hekking, Cahill 2 

Elective : Three hours, as in Junior year. 
(For students of Design.) 

Drawing 33 (Applied Design) . Benson 5 

Drawing 16a (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 5 

Drawing 35 (History of Ornament) . Griffith 2 

Elective: Three hours, as in the Junior year. 

Second Semester: 

(For students of Painting.) 

Drawing 12. Griffith, Hekking 5 

Drawing 166 (Composition) . Hekking 3 

Drawing 24 (Sketch Class) . Hekking, Cahill 2 

Drawing 38 (Graduation Thesis) 2 

Elective: Three hours in the College or the School of Education. 

(For students of Design.) 

Drawing 34 (Applied Design) . Benson 5 

Drawing 166 (Composition) . Hekking, Cahill 3 

Drawing 36 (History of Ornament) . Griffith 2 

Drawing 38 (Graduation Thesis) 2 

Elective: Three hours in the College or School of Education. 

17— K. U.— 5419. 



258 School of Fine Arts. 

PUBLIC-SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE. 

Leading to Teacher's Certificate in Public-school Music. 
Professor : Downing. 
Instructor : Hall. 

The course in public-school music is^ designed to prepare students for 
the position of teacher and supervisor of music in grade and high schools. 
Only the best modern methods are employed, and the training is so 
closely graded that, at the end of the course, the student has prepared 
full courses of music study for all grades, beginning with the kinder- 
garten and ending with the Senior year of the high school. 

The School of Fine Arts has made arrangements with the board of 
education of the city of Lawrence whereby the city supervisor of music 
is also an instructor in the School of Fine Arts. During the Freshman 
year all students spend two hours each week in the grade schools of the 
city, observing the music teaching done there. Toward the end of the 
year the students do the teaching. During the Sophomore year all stu- 
dents spend two hours each week in teaching music in the city schools. 

Special attention is given to correct methods of conducting choruses 
and orchestras, and to the materials and methods in community music 
work. 

At least one year of study in singing is required of students who pre- 
fer piano as a major. Ability to play the simpler compositions for piano 
or other instruments is required of students who take singing as a major. 

Students must attend the University Chorus rehearsals during both 
years of the course, unless they are members of an acceptable church 
choir. 

Teachers with normal training or experience in public schools and 
some preparatory work in music may be able to complete the two-year 
course in one year and a summer term of six weeks. Upon the completion 
of this course the| State Board of Education will issue a special certificate 
entitling the holder thereof to teach music in any of the grade or high 
schools of the state. 

As there is such a demand for orchestras in the high schools, a class 
in violin playing has been formed for the students in this course. In 
this class, proper methods of fingering and bowing are taught, and the 
student is given practical experience in the use of the violin as an or- 
chestral instrument. 

The School of Fine Arts rents violins to those students who may not 
possess an instrument. 

Candidates for this certificate must offer 60 credit hours. The sub- 
jects in the following curriculum are required. Other subjects to complete 
the necessary 60 hours may be offered from the School of Fine Arts, by 
arrangement with the Dean. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Semester: Hours credit. 

Public-school Music 1 (Grades 1, 2, 3 and 4) . Hall 3 

Musical Theory 1 ( Harmony) . Kendrie 3 

History of Music 1. Skilton 2 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 1. Hall 1 

Chorus 1. Nevin 1 

Recitals 1 1 

Physical Education 20 (Hygiene) 1 

Electives: Voice, Piano, Community Music, Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

Second Semester: 

Public-school Music 2 (Grades 5, 6, 7 and 8) . Hall 3 

Observation in Lawrence city schools. Hall : 1 

Musical Theory 2 (Harmony) . Kendrie 3 



Courses of Study. 259 

History of Music 2. Skilton 2 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 2. Hall 1 

Chorus 2. Nevin 1 

Recitals 2 1 

Elementary Education (School of Education) 3 

Physical Education. 

Electives: Voice, Piano, Supervisor's Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Semester: 

Public-school Music 3 (Junior and Senior High). Downing 2 

Practice teaching in Lawrence city schools. Hall 1 

Musical Theory 3 (Harmony) . Skilton 2 

History of Music 3. Skilton 2 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 3. Downing 

Conducting. Kendrie 

Musical Theory 11 (Instrumentation) . Nevin 

Chorus 3. Nevin 

Recitals 3 

General Psychology (The College) 3 

Physical Education. 

Electives: Voice, Piano, Supervisor's Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 

Second Semester: 

Public-school Music 4 (Senior High) . Downing 2 

Practice teaching in the Lawrence city schools. Hall 1 

Musical Theory 4 (Harmony). Skilton. 2 

History of Music 4. Skilton 2 

Musical Theory 12 (Instrumentation) . Nevin 1 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 4. Downing 1 

Chorus 4. Nevin 1 

Recitals 4 1 

Methods of Teaching (School of Education) 3 

Physical Education. 

Electives: Voice, Piano, Supervisor's Violin, etc. 

(Private lessons are subject to fees.) 
PUBLIC-SCHOOL ART COURSE. 

Leading to Teacher's Certificate in Public-school Art. 

Professors: Griffith, Hekking. 
Assistant Professor : Frazier. 
Instructor: Benson. 

The course in public-school art is designed to prepare students for the 
position of teacher and supervisor of art in grade and high schools. In 
addition to the work in methods of teaching art in the public schools, strict 
attention is given to actual practice in free-hand drawing, perspective, 
composition, design, and artistic anatomy. To comply with the regula- 
tions of the State Board of Education, nine hours of educational work in 
the College and the School of Education is included in the course. Upon 
the completion of this course the State Board of Education will issue a 
special certificate entitling the holder thereof to teach art in any of the 
grade or high schools of the state. 

SYLLABUS. 

This is a two-year course, requiring sixty credit hours for its com- 
pletion. 

For a description of these courses, see Drawing and Painting, on 
page 256. 



260 School of Fine Arts. 

Free-hand Drawing (courses 1, 2, 3 and 4) 12 credit hours. 

Perspective (course 17) 2 credit hours. 

Composition (courses 13a and 136) 4 credit hours. 

Design (courses 28, 29, 31, and 32) 14 credit hours. 

Artistic Anatomy (course 19) 2 credit hours. 

Art History (courses 25 and 26) 4 credit hours. 

Methods of Teaching Art in the Grade and High Schools 

(course 37) 8 credit hours. 

(a) Normal Art Methods. Two hours. A general survey of 
the problems of art instruction in the public schools. 
High-school drawing and methods of teaching. 

(6) Normal Art Methods. Two hours. Design, pure and 
applied in the high school. 

(c) Normal Art Methods. Two hours. Art appreciation 
for the grade school. Materials and methods of 
teaching. 

(d) Normal Art Methods. Two hours. Study of courses 
for art instruction in the grade school, their organiza- 
tion and selection of materials. 

General Psychology la (The College) 3 credit hours. 

Methods of Teaching 1 (The School of Education) 3 credit hours. 

Elementary Education 2 (The School of Education) .... 3 credit hours. 
Optional subjects from The School of Fine Arts, The 

College, or The School of Education 5 credit hours. 

Total 60 credit hours. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



The courses in .English, French, Italian, German, General Psychology, 
Greek Architecture, Physical Education and Physics are given in the 
College. They are open to regular fine arts students, on application to 
the Dean of the School of Fine Arts, but students must also enroll with 
the Dean of the College. The courses in Elementary Education and 
Methods of Teaching are offered in the School of Education. 

CHORUS. 

Professor : Nevin. 

Chorus 1 to 6 are required of all vocal students in the degree or cer- 
tificate courses. 

Chorus 1 to 4 are required of all public-school music students. 

Chorus 1 to 6. — Two hours rehearsal each week, with at least two 
public concerts each year. Study of the standard oratorios, cantatas, etc. ; 
miscellaneous sacred and secular choruses. Throughout the year. One 
hour credit each semester. Nevin. 

DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

Professors: Griffith, Hekking, Cahill. 
Assistant Professor : Frazier. 
Instructor .• Benson. 

All courses are required of students of drawing and painting and 
are open to other students of the School of Fine Arts who are prepared 
for them. 

1. — Free-hand Drawing. Free-hand drawing from the cast, in char- 
coal. The method of instruction aims to teach construction in a simple 
and correct manner. Freshmen, first semester, daily, 8:30 to 11:30. 

2. — Free-hand Drawing. Free-hand drawing in charcoal from ob- 
jects of still life, the head and cast. Freshmen, second semester, daily, 
8:30 to 11:30. 



Courses of Study. 261 

3. — Free-hand Drawing. Free-hand drawing from the living model, 
in charcoal. This class gives the student an opportunity to study the 
human figure, as offered in all regular art schools. Sophomore, first 
semester, daily, 8:30 to 11:30. 

4. — Painting. Painting with oil, water-color or pastel from still 
life. Students begin the study of color in this class. The observation 
and reproduction of simple masses of form and color. Freshmen, second 
semester, daily, at 8:30. 

5. — Painting. Advanced course in painting from still life in which 
the student makes studies of the art objects in the Thayer Art Museum. 
Sophomore, first semester, daily, at 3:30. 

6. — Painting. Painting from the living model. Students begin the 
study of portrait painting in the class. Sophomore, second semester, 
daily, 8:30 to 11:30, or 1:30 to 4:30. 

7. — Painting. Painting from landscape. The scenery around Law- 
rence is very picturesque. Abundant material is to be found on the 
campus of the University for the study of landscape painting at all 
times of the year. Sophomore, second semester, M. W. F., 1:30 to 4:30. 

8. — Painting. A continuation of course 6, for advanced portrait 
painting or the painting of the nude human figure. Junior first se- 
mester, daily, 8:30 to 11:30, or 1:30 to 4:30. 

9. — Painting. A continuation of course 7, for advanced landscape 
painting with special attention given to cloud effects, early morning and 
evening. Junior, first semester, daily 8:30 to 11:30. 

10. — Painting. Painting from life or landscape as student may elect. 
Junior, second semester, daily, 8:30 to 11:30, or 1:30 to 4:30. 

11. — Painting. A continuation of course 10. Senior, first semester, 
daily, 8:30 to 11:30, or 1:30 to 4:30. 

12. — Painting. A continuation of course 11. Senior, second se- 
mester, daily, 8:30 to 11:30, or 1:30 to 4:30. 

Courses 11 and 12 are the most advanced courses in painting. The 
student selects the materials in either landscape or the human figure. In 
season the model is posed in the open air. 

ISa-b, 14a-6, 15a-fe, 16a-6. — Composition. Throughout the entire 
course every student is required to study the compositions of the masters 
and to make each week one original composition upon a given subject. 
Tu. Th., at 2 and 11:30. 

17. — Perspective. Linear perspective and the geometrical problems 
of mechanical drawing. Special attention is given to graphic methods 
that are of practical use in laying out a drawing. Freshmen, first se- 
mester, Tu. Th., at 8:30. 

18. — Modeling. Modeling in clay from the cast. Copies are made 
from simple models, to illustrate the methods of building up form in clay, 
and coating them in plaster. 

19. — Artistic Anatomy. Freshmen, first semester, Tu. Th., at 11:30. 

20. — Artistic Anatomy. An advanced course for Juniors. First se- 
mester, Tu. Th., at 1. 

Courses 19 and 20 make a thorough study, from a textbook with 
lectures, of the bones and muscles of the human figure and the horse. 
Many drawings are made from the skeleton, anatomical casts, and a 
model. 

21, 22, 23, 24. — Sketch Class. Junior and Senior, both semesters, 
all classes in the school meet together in this class to make quick-time 
sketches, to show the action of the model selected. The model may be 
the draped human figure or some animal. M. W. F., at 3. 

25. — History of Modern Painting. With lectures, illustrated by 
lantern slides and reading in the library, covering the principal schools 
of painting in Europe. Sophomore, first semester, Tu. Th., at 1:30. 



262 School of Fine Arts. 

26. — History of American Painting. The art of painting in the 
United States from its beginning to the present time. Lectures illus- 
trated with original works of art and lantern slides, together with read- 
ing in the library. Sophomore, second semester, Tu. Th., at 9:30. 

27. — Art Criticism. A study of pictures from an analytical point of 
view, taking up the ideals and aims of the artist in making of his pro- 
duct. Junior, second semester, Tu. Th., at 8:30. 

28. — Design. Elementary design. Freshmen, second semester, M. W. 
F., 2:30 to 4:30. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a thorough training in 
the fundamental principles of design, as applied to the requirements of 
industry. The observation of the beauty of forms and color in plants, 
trees and landscape, with special emphasis upon the influence of locality 
in the development of artistic expression. In design 28 the elementary 
principles which underlie pattern are worked out in harmonies of lines, 
masses and values. 

29. — Design. A continuation of course 28. Sophomore, first semester, 
M. W. F., 1:30 to 3:30. Harmonies of color are worked out by water- 
color rendering of original designs. 

30. — Design. Advanced design. Sophomore, second semester, M. W. 
F., 2:30 to 4:30. Original designs are worked out for pottery, embroidery 
(Tussah silks are used on hand-woven linens) stenciling, wood-block 
printing, wood carving, modeled leather and book plates. 

31. — Design. Specialization. The application of design as applied to 
the production of ceramic art, metal work, textile, leather, or wood work. 
Junior, first semester, daily, 1:30 to 4:30. ! 

32. — Design, A continuation of course 31. Junior, second semester, 
daily, 8:30 to 11:30. 

33. — Design. A continuation of course 32. Senior, first semester, 
daily, 8:30 to 11:30. 

34. — Design. A continuation of course 33. Senior, second semester, 
daily, 8:30 to 11:30. 

35. — History of Design The general principles of historic ornament. 
Senior, first semester, Tu. Th., at 1:30. 

36. — History of Design. A continuation of course 35, with special 
reference to the history of ceramic art and textiles. Senior, second se- 
mester, Tu. Th., at 1:30. 

37. — Normal Art. By appointment. See description on page 27. 

38. — Graduation Thesis. Every student receiving a degree from the 
University must leave with the department an example of original work 
made during the Senior year, the studies and design for same to be 
approved by the head of the department before the end of the first 
semester. 

ENSEMBLE. 

Professor : Nevin. 

Assistant Professor: Greisingbe. 

1. — Ensemble. The study of simple ensemble, beginning with the 
duet form and advancing to work at two pianos; symphonies by Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven; famous overtures; compositions by Grieg, Mozkow- 
ski, Bizet, Schubert, Jensen, Mendelssohn. Sophomore, first semester, 
Tu., 3 to 5:30. Nevin. 

2. — Ensemble. Continuation of Ensemble 1. Arrangements of classics 
for two pianos, four and eight hands; original two-piano compositions 
by Arensky, Debussy, Saint-Saens, Chaminade, Grieg, Schumann. Sopho- 
more, second semester, Tu., 3:30 to 5:30. Nevin. 

3. — Ensemble. The study of compositions for strings and piano. 
Compositions for two violins and piano by Purcell, Carse and others ; for 



Courses of Study. 263 

three violins and piano by Taylor, Trousselle, Rieding, Hayward, to- 
gether with the smaller orchestral compositions of Bizet, Wagner, Nes- 
ler, Moszkowski, Saint-Saens, etc. Junior, first semester, M., 2:30 to 
4:30. Nevin. 

4. — Ensemble. Continuation of Ensemble 3. The study of the larger 
forms of composition; Trios by Schubert, Beethoven, Strauss, Moszkow- 
ski; sonatas for violin and piano by Grieg, Gade, Brahms and Franck; 
concertos by De Beriot, Mendelssohn, Saint-Saens and Wieniawski ; string 
quartets by Haydn, Mozart, Schubert and Beethoven. Junior, second 
semester, M., 2:30 to 4:30. Nevin. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. 

Professors: Dunlap, Hopkins, O'Leary. 

Associate Professors: Whitcomb, Johnson, Sisson, Lynn. 

Assistant Professor : Gardner. 

1. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Three hours, first semester. 
Required of all Freshmen in the School of Fine Arts. 

Gardner and assistants. 

2. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Two hours, second semes- 
ter. A continuation of course 1. Required of all Freshmen in the 
School of Fine Arts. Gardner and assistants. 

10. — English Literature. Two hours, first semester. Required of 
all Sophomores in the School of Fine Arts. Johnson and assistants. 

11. — English Literature. Three hours, second semester. A con- 
tinuation of course 10. Required of all Sophomores in the school of 
Fine Arts. Johnson and assistants. 

12 and 13. — History of English Literature. 12, three hours; 13, 
two hours, first semester. An elective for Juniors in the School of Fine 
Arts. Lynn and assistants. 

14 and 15. — History of English Literature. 14, two hours credit; 
15, three hours credit, second semester. Course 14 is a continuation of 
course 12 and course 15, of course 13; 12 and 14, or 13 and 15 are re- 
quired for admission to all subsequent courses in English Literature. 

Lynn and assistants. 

50. — Narration and Description. Three hours, first semester. 

O'Leary and Lynn. 

51. — Narraton and Description. Two hours, second semester. A 
continuation of course 50. O'Leary and Lynn. 

71. — American Literature I. Three hours credit. First semester, 
at 1. Hopkins. 

72. — American Literature II. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
at 1. Hopkins. 

76. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three 
hours, first semester. Dunlap. 

77. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three 
hours, first semester. Dunlap. 

78. — Shakspere. Three hours, both semesters. Dunlap. 

87. — The English Novel. Three hours, second semester. Dunlap. 



264 School of Fine Arts. 

FRENCH. 

Professor ; Galloo. 

Associate Professor: Netjen Schwander. 

Assistant Professors: Stanton, Mahieu. 

1.— Elementary French I. Five hours, both semesters. 

Neuen Schwander and assistants. 
2.— Elementary French II. Five hours, both semesters. 
„ „ „ Neuen Schwander and assistants. 

3.— Modern French Prose. Three hours, both semesters. 

Stanton, Mahieu. 
4.— Composition. Two hours, both semesters. 

Stanton, Mahieu. 

GERMAN. 

Professors: Thurnau, Engel,. 

1.— Elementary German. Five hours credit, both semesters. 

Engel. 

2.— German Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit, both semes- 
ters* Kruse. 

3. — Intermediate German. Five hours credit, both semesters. 

Thurnau. 

4.— German Classics. Three hour credit, both semesters. 

Engle, Kruse, Thurnau. 

The following courses are arranged for regular students of voice, and 
are required in the Sophomore year: 

1.— German Grammar (Fine Arts). Vos's Essentials of German, 
with emphasis on correct pronunciation and sentence melody. First se- 
mester, M. W. F., at 8. (Three hours.) Thurnau. 

2. — German Reading (Fine Arts). Vos's Essentials of German com- 
pleted. Reading of easy German prose, and selected lyric poems. Sec- 
ond semester, M. W. F., at 8. (Three hours.) Kruse. 

GREEK. 

Professor : Wilcox. 
Associate Professor : Brandt. 

88. — Greek Architecture. Two hours, first semester. Brandt. 
89. — Greek Sculpture and Painting. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. Brandt. 

HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

Professor : Skilton. 

Textbook, "The Study of the History of Music," by Edward Dickin- 
son, published by Scribners. Lectures and recitations, with musical 
illustrations by instructors, members of the class, and on the Victrola, 
making the students familiar with the actual music of the period studied. 
Outside reading and preparation of a paper is required for each recita- 
tion, and a notebook must be handed in at the end of each semester. 

1. — History of Music. Primitive music; savage and oriental music; 
music of the ancient cultured nations; music of the early Christian 
church; the Roman Catholic liturgy and chant; popular music in the 
Middle Ages; the beginnings of polyphonic music; age of the Nether- 
landers; choral music in the sixteenth century; early German Protest- 
ant music; Protestant church music in England; beginning of the opera 
and the monodic style; growth of instrumental music; organ,, violin and 
piano. First semester, Tu Th., at 2:30. (Two hours.) Skilton. 



Courses of Study. 265 

2. — History of Music. Italian opera, serious and comic, in seven- 
teenth and eighteenth centuries; opera in France and England in seven- 
teenth century; Italian style in German church music; Bach and Handel; 
opera comique in the eighteenth century; Gliick, Haydn, and Mozart. 
Second semester, Tu. Th., at 2:30. (Two hours.) Skilton. 

3. — History of Music. Beethoven; Weber and the romantic opera; 
Schubert and the German song; piano playing to 1830; Schumann, 
Mendelssohn and Chopin; program music; Berlioz and Liszt; Italian 
and French opera in first half of the nineteenth century. First semester, 
Tu. Th., at 3:30. (Two hours.) Skilton. 

4. — History of Music. Wagner and the opera; modern music of 
Germany and Austria; modern music of France and Italy; modern 
Slavonic and Scandinavian music; modern music in England and 
America; the ultra-modern movement. Second semester, Tu. Th., at 3:30. 
(Two hours.) Skilton. 

ITALIAN. 

Professor : Galloo. 

Assistant Professor : Stanton. 

Instructor : Cram. 

Required of all Freshmen in the vocal course leading to a degree. 

1. — Elementary Italian I. Three hours credit, first semester. M. 
W. F., at 11:30. Cram. 

2. — Elementary Italian II. Continuation of course I. Three hours 
credit, second semester, M. W. F., at 11:30. Cram. 

MUSICAL THEORY. 

Professors: Skilton, Kendrie. 

Courses 1 to 6, 11, 12, and 15 are required of all students in the di- 
ploma courses. Students who do not take courses 7 and 8 in the Junior 
year must take courses 13 and 14 in the Senior year. 

Courses 1 to 4, 11, and 12 are required of all students in the two-year 
public-school music course. 

Courses 9 and 10 may be taken only at the invitation of the instructor. 

1. — Harmony. The study of overtones, scales, intervals, triads and 
seventh chords and their inversions. The practical work consists of 
harmonizing melodies in soprano or bass and playing chord progressions 
at the piano. Freshman, first semester, M. W. F., at 9:30 and 1:30. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:30. Anger's Harmony used. (Three 
hours.) Kendrie. 

2. — Harmony. The study of close and open harmony, dominant ninth 
and diminished seventh chords, modulations. Practical work continued. 
Freshman, second semester, M. W. F., at 9:30 and 1:30. (Three hours.) 

Kendrie. 

3. — Harmony. The study of modulation, irregular resolutions, altered 
chords, suspensions, passing tones, organ point, harmonization of florid 
melodies. Practical work continued. Sophomore, first semester, Tu. Th., 
at 2:30. (Two hours.) Skilton. 

4. — Harmony. Suspensions, passing tones, appoggiaturas, neighboring 
tones, organ point, harmonization of florid melodies, analysis. Practical 
work continued. Sophomore, second semester, Tu. Th., at 2:30. (Two 
hours.) • Skilton. 

5. — Counterpoint. The different orders of single counterpoint in two, 
three and four parts. Junior, first semester, Tu. Th., at 1:30. (Two 
hours.) Preyer. 

6. — Counterpoint. Double and triple counterpoint, counterpoint in 



266 School of Fine Arts. 

the twelfth and fifteenth and in more than four parts. Modern counter- 
point. Junior, second semester, Tu. Th., at 1:30. (Two hours.) 

Preyer. 

7.— Musical Composition. The theme and variation, dance and song 
forms. Analysis of classical models, and practical work. Junior, first 
semester, Th., at 3:30. (One hour.) Skilton. 

8. — Musical Composition. The sonata and rondo forms; analysis 
of classical sonatas; original work. Junior, second semester, Th., at 
3:30. (One hour.) Skilton. 

9. — Musical Composition. Original work in modern forms. Open 
only to those who show talent for composition. Senior, first semester, by 
appointment. (One hour.) Skilton. 

10. — Musical Composition. Continuation of course 9. Open only to 
those who show talent for composition. Senior, second semester, by ap- 
pointment. (One hour.) Skilton. 

11.— Instrumentation. The nature and treatment of the different 
instruments of the orchestra. The overture, symphony, cantata. Practical 
work for the University Orchestra. Senior, first semester, Tu., at 11:30. 
(One hour.) Nevin. 

12. — Instrumentation. Continuation of course 11. Senior, second 
semester, Tu., at 11:30. (One hour.) Nevin. 

13. — Form and Analysis. The hymn tune and short song form; 
motive, phrase and section; the song form with trio; dance forms as 
distinguished by rhythm and style; illustrations from Bach's Preludes, 
Inventions and Suites, and from short piano pieces 1 and songs of modern 
composers. Senior, first semester, W., at 11 : 30. (One hour.) Skilton. 

14.— Form and Analysis. The sonata and symphony; form of each 
movement; the overture, chamber music and fugue; the motet, cantata 
mass, passion, and oratorio; examination of at least one classical example 
of each. Senior, second semester, W., at 11:30. (One hour.) Skilton. 

15.— -Canon and Fugue. The various forms of canon and their use in 
composition. The fugue and original work. Senior, first semester, F., at 
2. (One hour.) Skilton. 

ORGAN. 

Professor : Skilton. 
Instructor: Emley - Elliott. 

1. — Manual and Pedal Studies. Merkel or Archer. Pedal scales 
and arpeggios; the principles of hymn playing. Sophomore, first se- 
mester, one hour a week, by appointment. 

2. — Manual and Pedal Studies. Buck's studies in Pedal Phrasing; 
Schmidt's Organ Etudes; Bach's Little Preludes and Fugues, Flagler's 
The Organist's Treasury, and other selections. Sophomore, second se- 
mester, one hour, by appointment. 

3. — Service and Solo Playing. Buck's Choir Accompaniment. Vari- 
ous styles of hymn playing; accompaniment of solo and chorus. 
Schneider's Pedal Studies, easier preludes and fugues of Bach and 
Mendelssohn. Modern pieces by Batiste, Lemmens, Guilmant, and others. 
Junior, first semester, two hours, by appointment. 

4. — Service and Solo Playing. Arrangement of piano accompani- 
ment for organ. Practice in accompanying singers. The easier sonatas 
of Mendelssohn, Merkel, Guilmant, and others. Junior, second semester, 
two hours, by appointment. 

5. — Church and Concert Playing. Practical work in playing the 
church service. The more difficult fugues and sonatas. Concert pieces 
by Widor, Guilmant, Saint-Saens, Thiele, and others. Senior, first se- 
mester, two hours a week, by appointment. 



Courses of Study. 267 

6. — Church and Concert Playing. Extemporization and transposi- 
tion. Program making. Preparation of a recital. Senior, second se- 
mester, two hours a week, by appointment. 

7. — Church Music. The history of church music, examination of 
different schools and styles. Senior, first semester, one hour a week. 

8 and 9. — Organ Construction. Examination of tracker, tubular 
pneumatic, and electric action in available organs. Practice in tuning. 
One hour a week, Junior year, by appointment. 

PIANOFORTE. 

Professor : Preyer. 

Assistant Professors: Greisinger, Sweeney. 

Instructors : Miller, Emley - Elliott. 

Courses 1 to 12, inclusive, are open only to students of the School of 
Fine Arts. 

1 and 2. — Piano. Hanon: Virtuoso Pianist. A limited number of 
studies from the following: Hoffman, Etudes for the Left Hand; Cramer- 
Buelow, Sixty Selected Etudes; Preyer, Twenty Etudes, op. 25 
(Schirmer) ; Bach, two-part inventions (Litolff, No. 42), etc. Sonatas by 
Hayden, Mozart, Beethoven. Selections from classic and modern composi- 
tions. Freshman, throughout the year, twice a week, by appointment. 

Assistants. 

3 and 4. — Piano. Pischna: Technical Exercises. Etudes, selected ac- 
cording to the needs of the pupil, from Jensen, op. 32; MacDowell, op. 39; 
Haberbier, Etudes Poesis, op. 53; Preyer, op. 30 and op. 45; Hollaender, 
intermezzi for left hand: Bach, three-part inventions. Concertos by 
Mozart, Hummel, etc. Selections from classic and modern compositions. 
Sophomore, throughout the year, twice a week, by appointment. 

Assistants. 

5 and 6. — Phillip: Daily Exercises, dementi's Gradus ad Parnas- 
sum; Etudes from Moscheles, op. 70; Seeling, Concert Etudes, op. 10; 
Chopin, Preludes; Bach, Well-tempered Clavichord (Reinecke, B. and 
H.) ; concertos by Beethoven, Mendelssohn, etc.; concert pieces by classic 
and modern composers. Junior, throughout the year, private lessons, 
twice a week, by appointment. Preyer. 

7 and 8. — Joseffy: School of Advanced Piano Playing. Phillipp, 
Etudes for the Left Hand; Etudes for Chopin, op. 10 and op. 25; Rubin- 
stein, op. 23, etc. Sonatas and concertos by Beethoven, Weber, Grieg, 
etc. Concert pieces by modern composers. Senior, throughout the year, 
private lessons, twice a week, by appointment. Preyer. 

9 to 12. — A course for the study of pianoforte methods, aiming to 
develop independence of the fingers, and acquiring correct habits of prac- 
ticing the scales, arpeggios, trills octaves, chords, etc. Freshman and 
Sophomore, throughout the year. Wednesday, 3 to 4. Miller. 

13 and 14. — Teaching Materials. A study of teaching materials for 
piano. Each pupil is required to keep a notebook, teach one practice 
student and attend a one-hour class each week. Open to all students but 
Freshman, and to advanced special students. Twice a week, throughout 
the year, by appointment. Required of all candidates for the three- 
year teacher's certificate in piano. Greisinger. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH. 

Professors : Hamilton (Head of Department), Sundwall. 

Associate Professor : Goetz. 

Instructors: Bond, Pratt, Cole, Stegee. 

Secretary: Mrs. Strickler. 

This department is in process of reorganization. 

All Freshman students must take two hours of exercise and attend 
the hygiene lectures (Course 20), one hour each week, at 4:30 o'clock. 
All Sophomore students must take two hours of exercise each week. 



268 School of Fine Arts. 

HEALTH. 

The University health service maintains two hospitals. One is a gen- 
eral hospital and dispensary which is open to all students for general 
treatment, consultation and advice. The other is used for communicable 
cases, where isolation is necessary. 

All students are given a thorough physical examination on entrance, 
at which time inquiry is made as to previous illness and general physical 
history. Advice is given as to amount and kind of exercise, also diet 
and general personal hygiene, especially in cases where undernutrition 
exists or other metabolic disorders. 

Where physical conditions contra-indicate regular gymnasium courses, 
special corrective work is prescribed. Students presenting physical de- 
fects such as spinal curvature, defective arches, bad posture, defective 
breathing, poor chest development, etc., are also placed in charge of 
this special instructor, who gives individual work directed toward the 
correction of particular conditions. 

There is a large rest and silence room in the gymnasium, where stu- 
dents exhibiting symptoms of fag and exhaustion may rest instead of 
exercise. Definite hours of rest are prescribed and substituted for exer- 
cise when the welfare of the student so requires. 

COURSES OF EXERCISE. 

Advanced students may elect any of the forms of. exercise in which 
they are particularly interested. 

Exercise 1. First semester, M. W.. F. Calisthenics, wands, dumb- 
bells, pulley weights, elastic exercises, folk dances 1 and gymnastic games. 

Exercise 2. Second semester, M. W. F. Continuation of course 1. 
Prerequisite, course 1, or its equivalent. 

Exercise 3. First semester, Tu. Th. Swedish gymnastics, folk 
dancing, esthetic and rhythmical exercises; Indian clubs. Prerequisite, 
course 2. Required of Sophomores. 

Exercise 4. Second semester, Tu. Th. A continuation of course 3. 
Prerequisite, course 3. Required of Sophomores. 

Exercise 8. Esthetic Dancing. Both semesters. 

1. Elementary Dancing. First semester, Tu. Th., at 4. 

2. Elementary Dancing. Second semester, M. W. F., at 4. 

Prerequisite, one year of physical exercise. 

3. Advanced Dancing. First semester, M. W. F., at 4. 

4. Advanced Dancing. Second semester, Tu. Th., at 4. 

Prerequisite, Dancing 1 and 2, or its equivalent. 

Swimming. The swimming pool is used by the women students on 
Monday and Thursday from 10:30 to 12:30; and from 2:30 to 5:30. All 
students are advised to learn to swim. 

Basketball. Regular practice is held daily, at 3, but organized 
teams may play at any time when the floor is unoccupied. 

Tennis. There are five courts on South Field reserved for the women 
students. 

Field Hockey. Class and other teams may be organized, and have 
regular hours for practice on South Field. Hockey sticks and balls are 
provided by the University. 

Other games may be played whenever the field is unoccupied and when 
groups of students select a time. 

PHYSICS. 

Assistant Professor : Stimpson. 

65. — Elementary Acoustics. A course of about twenty lectures, 
with demonstrations, upon the scientific basis of harmony. Required of 
Junior and Senior students of the School of Fine Arts. Third half-term, 
M. W., at 4:30. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1919-20.) 

Stimpson. 



Courses of Study. 269 

public-school music. 

Music Supervisors' Course. 

Professor : Downing. 
Instructor : Hall. 

1. — Teaching of Music in Elementary Schools. Methods and ma- 
terials for grades 1, 2, 3, and 4. Logical development in teaching; rote 
song; songs of the seasons; staff notation; voice training; scales without 
technical explanation; scales with technical explanation; use of paper 
keyboards; ear training; rhythm tapping; reading at sight; games and 
plays. First semester, M. W. F., at 1:30. (Three hours.) Hall. 

2. — Teaching of Music in Elementary Schools. Methods and ma- 
terials for grades 5, 6, 7, and 8. Two- and three-part songs; vocal de- 
velopment; ear training; sight singing; dictation; music appreciation; 
games and plays. Second semester, M. W. F., at 1:30. (Three hours.) 

Hall. 
General Pedagogical Problems. — Advantage of normal training; re- 
lation of supervisor to grade teacher, principal, and superintendent; 
types of children. Examination of books and materials for all grades. 
3. — Teaching of Music in Junior and Senior High-schools. 
Methods and materials for the Junior high school and the first year of 
the Senior high school. Three- and four-part songs; treatment of un- 
changed and changed voices; sight singing; ear training; melodic and 
rhythmic dictation; simple modulations; the bass voice. First semester, 
Tu. Th., at 9:30. (Two hours.) Downing. 

4. — Teaching of Music in the High School. High-school music 
from artistic and scientific viewpoints; Choral singing (including sight 
singing); girls' and boys' glee clubs; high-school orchestra; classes in 
history and theory (harmony, ear training, analysis). Outlines for 
courses of study in logical development of teaching the simpler forms of 
musical theory, suitable for use in high schools. Second semester, Tu. 
Th., at 9:30. (Two hours.) Downing. 

General Pedagogical Problems. — The city music supervisor as high- 
school teacher of music; the relation of the music teacher to other 
teachers in the high school; value of courses in psychology and educa- 
tion to those preparing to teach music ; planning work for high schools 
where no definite courses have been followed. Examination of books and 
materials. 

1. — Observation. Two hours each week in the city schools observing 
how music is taught; followed by actual practice in teaching in the city 
schools. Freshman, second semester, by appointment. (One hour.) 

Hall. 
1. — Practice Teaching. Actual teaching in all the grades of the city 
schools of Lawrence. Sophomore, first semester, by appointment. (One 
hour.) Hall, j 

2. — Practice Teaching. A continuation of Practice Teaching 1 ; also 
observation in the junior and senior high schools. Sophomore, second 
semester, by appointment. (One hour.) Hall. 

Conducting. A course in the proper methods to be used in conduct- 
ing choruses and orchestras, with actual experience in the work. First 
semester, F., at 11:30. (One hour.) Kendrie. 

Community Music. Methods and materials used in organizing and 
conducting all phases of community music; relation to community life; 
actual experience in conducting. Second semester, M., at 11:30. (One 
hour.) Nevin. 

Supervisor's Violin. In class. Proper methods of bowing and 
fingering; practical experience in the use of the violin as an orchestral 
instrument; materials used by the high-school orchestra. Both semesters, 
W., at 11:30. (One hour.) Kendrie. 



270 School of Fine Arts. 

Course in the College. 

la. — General Psychology. Three hours, first semester, at 10:30, on 
Monday and Wednesday, and a third hour by appointment. 

Hunter, Docker ay. 

Courses in the School of Education. 

1. — Methods of Teaching. Three hours, second semester, at 10:30. 

Nutt. 
2. — Elementary Education. Three hours, second semester, at 8:30. 

Kelly. 

VIOLIN. 

Professor : Kendrib. 

1 and 2. — Kreutzer's Forty Studies. Scale Studies by Alard or 
Schradieck. Selections from Sevcik's Four Thousand Bow Studies. Solos 
by Singelee, Alard, Leonard, Bohm, Daube, and others. Duets by Mazas 
and Dancla. Concertos by Rode and De Beriot. 

3 and 4. — Kreutzer's Forty Studies. Fiorillo's Thirty-six Studies. 
Scale Studies by Alard or Schradieck. Selections from Sevcik's Four 
Thousand Bow Studies. Sonatas, concertos, selections from composi- 
tions of Bach, Handel, Beethoven, De Beriot, Ernst, Vieuxtemps, Viotti, 
Wieniawski, Brahms, Leonard, Sarasate, Hubay, and Kreisler. En- 
semble playing. 

5 and 6. — Kreutzer's Forty Studies. Fiorillo's Thirty-six Studies. 
Selections from Sevcik's Technic Studies. Sonatas of Bach, Handel, Bee- 
thoven, Rubinstein, Franck, Grieg, and Sjogren. Selections for com- 
positions of Wieniawski, Leonard, Hubay, Sarasate, Bazzini, Saint-Saens, 
Vieuxtemps, Zarzycki, Natchez, Shubert, Schumann, and Chopin. Violin 
duets. Standard concertos. Ensemble playing. 

7 and 8. — Fiorillo's Thirty-six Studies. Rode's Twenty-four Studies. 
Selections from Sevcik's Technic Studies. Sonatas for violin alone by 
Bach. Compositions of Handel, Tartini, Ernst, Pagaini, Wieniawski, 
Vieuxtemps, and others. Standard concertos. Selections from composi- 
tions of American composers, including study of trios, quartets, and 
orchestral compositions. Other ensemble work. 

RECITALS. 

Recitals 1 to 8, required of all music students in the degree or four- 
year certificate courses. 

Recitals 1 to 4, required of all public school music students. 

Recitals 1 to 8. Attendance at all private and public student recitals, 
faculty concerts, University Concert Course concerts, and such other 
concerts as the Dean may announce. Student must turn in his notebook 
at the end of each semester. One hour credit each semester. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 

Professors: Butler, Downing. 

Associate Professor: . 

Instructor : Reynolds. 

1 and 2. — Tone Placing and Breath Control. Dictation exercises 
for the special needs of the individual voice. Sustained tones. Breath 
control and the true legato. The study of conditions necessary for the 
poising of the voice. The Italian vowels. Technical exercises selected 
from Marchesi, Lamperti, Sieber, Abt, Panofka, Garcia, and Shakspere. 
Simple English and Italian songs. Freshman, twice a week throughout 
the year, by appointment. Butler, Downing, Reynolds. 



Courses of Study. 271 

3 and 4. — Voice Extension. Development of tone. Breath control. 
Exercises for flexibility from Lamperti, Nava, Concone, Vannini, Bor- 
dogni, Sieber, and Shakspere. English and Italian songs. German 
lieder. Church solos. Sophomore, twice a week through the year, by 
appointment. Butler, Downing, Reynolds. 

5 and 6. — Study of Tone Color. Exercises for flexibility, continued. 
Embellishments. Exercises from Concone, Panofka, Marchesi, Garcia, 
Panseron, and Rossini. German lieder, English oratorio, and church 
solos. Junior, twice a week throughout the year, by appointment. 

Butler, Downing. 

7 and 8. — Style and Interpretation. A comparative study. Exer- 
cises for bravura singing from Marchesi. Flexibility and finishing ex- 
ercises from the masterpieces of vocalization. Stage deportment. Se- 
lections from opera and oratorio. Modern Italian, German, and French 
song literature. Senior, twice a week throughout the year, by appoint- 
ment. Butler, Downing. 

9. — Vocal Seminar. An intensive study of the classic Italian song 
literature: Bononcini, Cavalli, Caldara, Pergolese, Paisiello, Monteverde, 
Scarlatti, Carissimi, Lotti, Gluck, Handel, etc. The German romantic 
school; Schubert, Schumann and Franz; with especial attention to cor- 
rect diction and interpretation. Open to Juniors, Seniors and advanced 
special students. First semester. Once a week, by appointment. 

Butler. 

10. — Vocal Seminar. A continuation of 9. Modern French, German 
and Russian song literature. Representative American song composers; 
Chadwick, Beach, Foote, Rogers, Carpenter, Nevin, Coombs, Arthur 
Nevin, Homer, Gilbert, Hadley, etc. Second semester. Once a week, by 
appointment. Butler. 



SECTION VI. 

School of Law, 

(273) 



18— K. U.— 5419. 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

James W. Green, A. M., Dean, and Professor of Law. 

William L. Burdick, Ph. D., LL. B., Professor of Law. 

William E. Higgins,* B. S., LL. B., Professor of Law 

Henry W. Humble, A. M., J. D., Professor of Law. 

Edward D. Osborn,* Professor of Law. 

Raymond F. Rice, A. B., LL. B., Associate Professor of Law. 

Lecturers for 1918-1919. 

J. G. Slonecker, United States Referee in Bankruptcy, Topeka. 
Henry F. Mason, Justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas. 
Rousseau A. Burch, Justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas. 
J. C. Ruppenthal, Justice of the District Court, Russell. 
W. C. Michaels, Attorney at Law, Kansas City, Missouri. 
D. A. Valentine, Clerk of the Supreme Court of Kansas. 
Thos. E. Wagstaff, Attorney at Law, Independence, Kansas. 
Edwin A. Krauthoff, Attorney at Law, Kansas City, Missouri. 

* Absent on leave. 



(275) 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 



PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL. 

It is the aim of the School of Law to give its students a thorough ac- 
quaintance with the general principles of American law and to "furnish 
a course of legal instruction that shall fit them to practice at the bar of 
any state of the Union; also to give those who do not expect to become 
practicing attorneys, but who desire to pursue certain legal subjects for 
their bearing upon business, such instruction as may be best suited to 
their needs. 

DEGREE GRANTED. 

The course of study of the School of Law occupies three years, and 
leads to the degree of bachelor of laws (LL. B.). 

CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE. 

If the student does not graduate, he may, on application to the Regis- 
trar, receive an official certificate of his attendance and of the work ac- 
complished by him in the School. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The members of each class will be examined upon each topic when 
completed. A final examination will be held at the end of the third year, 
embracing all the studies of the course. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR. 

The legislature of 1903 amended the statute regulating admission to 
the bar, and provided for state examinations by a commission appointed 
by the supreme court. This act provides that applicants must be grad- 
uates of this School of Law or of an institution of equal standing, or 
they must have studied law for three years in a law office. The board 
of examiners meets at Topeka on the third Monday in January and June. 
Applications for examination and proof of qualifications must be filed 
with the secretary of the board at least three weeks before the exam- 
ination. Printed forms of application may be obtained from the clerk 
of the supreme court, Topeka, Kansas. 

All applicants must present high-school certificates or affidavits from 
teachers showing the completion of the following subjects, or pass ex- 
aminations therein, to wit: Three years English — grammar, rhetoric, 
and literature; arithmetic, algebra, geometry; general history, Roman, 
English, and American history; civil government; the elements of physics, 
physical geography, botany, biology; political economy and sociology. 

All candidates for admission are required to pass a written examina- 
tion covering their legal qualifications. All subjects included in this 
examination are within the course of study of the University School 
of Law. 

ADMISSION. 

Work in Preparation for Law. All persons proposing to enter upon 
the study of law are earnestly recommended to take first either a regu- 
lar or special course in the College. A good fundamental education is 
necessary to a successful study of law. Especially is it necessary now 
when the practitioner must come into competition with men who have 

(277) 



278 The School of Law. 

had a thorough university training before they entered upon the study 
of law. 

The College offers special work in subjects of great value as prepara- 
tory to the study of law: English and American constitutional and polit- 
ical history, constitutional law, political science, economics, sociology, 
history of international and common law, rhetoric and English com- 
position, and debating. These courses are especially recommended in 
preparation for law. 

Requirements for Admission. Thirty hours credit in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences of the University of Kansas, or its equivalent 
in some other university or approved college, in addition to graduation 
from a four-year high school, is required for entrance to the School of 
Law. 

This credit may be proved by proper certificate of the authorities of 
the university or college where the work was done, or it may be obtained 
by examination upon aplication to the University of Kansas. 

Special Students. Opportunity is given in the School of Law for 
the admission of persons of mature years who desire to pursue special 
work without following any prescribed course or becoming candidates 
for a degree. 

The admission of such special students is under the control of the 
Dean of the School, whose certificate of acceptance must be presented 
to the Registrar before registration. Applicants for standing as special 
students must present satisfactory evidence of proper preparation for 
the studies desired, and must also meet other requirements as fixed by 
the Faculty. 

Special students are subject to the same regulations as regular stu- 
dents with regard to the quality of work performed and attendance at 
recitations and examinations. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. Credit for work of collegiate or 
professional standing is granted only on recommendation of the Advanced 
Standing Committee. For regulations governing the granting of such 
credit, see "Admission to Advanced Standing," Section I, page 49. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission to the Law School, and all students in- 
tending to pursue studies therein during the ensuing year, must present 
themselves for registration at the University on September 15, 16, or 17, 
1919. Registration at a later date will be permitted only on the payment 
of a fee of one dollar. 

ENROLLMENT. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar, and after 
fees have been paid, students should apply to the Dean for enrollment 
in their classes. Enrollment the first semester occurs September 16 and 
17, 1919, and on the first day of the second semester. Enrollment at a 
later date will be permitted only on the payment of a fee of one dollar. 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state 25.00 

for nonresidents 35 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5 . 00 

Information concerning the location of rooming and boarding places 
may be had at the office of the registrar, or from the Secretary of the 
University Y. M. C. A. 

The average price of board, rooms, light, and fuel may be placed at 
from $4 to $7 a week. Day board in private families and at city res- 



Equipment. 279 

taurants may be obtained for $3.50 to $5 a week. Day board in clubs 
varies from $3.50 to $4 a week. Furnished rooms, usually occupied by 
two students, range from $4 to $15 a month. Unfurnished rooms rent 
for $1.50 to $3 a month. Students who can supply their own furniture 
and buy and prepare provisions for the table themselves can lessen ex- 
penses materially. 

STUDENT HONORS AND ACTIVITIES. 

Honors. By resolution, the State Bar Association of Kansas, as a 
recognition of the School of Law and for the purpose of encouraging its 
students to work along the line of legal literature, assigns a place on 
the literary program of the annual meeting at Topeka to that student 
of the Senior class who prepares the best paper on some legal topic 
assigned by the Law Faculty. The merits of the papers submitted are 
passed upon by a committee appointed for the purpose. 

See, also, "Prizes and Aids." General Section, p. 54. 

Cooley Club. Meetings of the club occur once each week. Any stu- 
dent of the school of law is eligible, but the membership is confined at 
present mainly to the members of the Junior and Middle classes. Legal 
questions are debated, and to this is added the work of the ordinary 
literary debating society. 

Kent Club. The members of the Kent Club are, in the main, mem- 
bers of the Senior class, although any student in the school of Law is 
eligible to membership. The work consists of the discussion of legal, 
economic, and historical questions, and the consideration of legal litera- 
ture. Debating is a prominent feature of the work of the club. 

Debating. Interstate debates are held each year with Oklahoma, 
Missouri, and Colorado state universities. Members of the Law School 
are admitted to the preliminary contest held for the purpose of choosing 
representatives on each of these debates. Those chosen receive practical 
instruction in public speaking and debating from a committee of the 
general Faculty of the University. Law students are also eligible to 
membership in the general literary clubs of the University. 

EQUIPMENT. 

Green Hall. A building for the School of Law w&s completed dur- 
ing the summer of 1905, at a cost of $65,000, and is one of the most 
complete and best-equipped law buildings in the west. It has three 
floors, devoted to recitation rooms, offices, library, and rooms for the Law 
School clubs. The library contains space for about 20,000 volumes, and 
private study rooms for students and Faculty open into the reading 
room of the library. A large room is set aside for a practice court, and 
the best facilities possible are available for students of the law. 

Libraries. The law library, composed of 9,840 volumes, is for the ex- 
clusive use of the students of the School of Law. The library has an 
excellent equipment of the best law textbooks, and new texts are being 
added constantly. It has also reports of the courts of last resort, both 
state and federal, as well as Lawyers' Reports Annotated, American 
Decisions, American Reports, the complete Reporter system, and the full 
reprints of the English cases. Limited space has prevented as rapid 
growth of the library as desired, and in the new building large additions 
will be made to the Library equipment. In addition to the volumes de- 
voted exclusively to law, the University library of 124,000 volumes is at 
the disposal of the law students. They thus have at hand the largest and 
best-selected scholarly library in the Southwest. The city library, housed 
in the Carnegie building, is also open to students of the School of Law 
for books of fiction and general literature. 

State Library. The state library at Topeka, which is largely a law 
library, is easily accessible to students upon necessary occasions. Such 



280 The School of Law. 

works as may be found usually in large state libraries will therefore be 
at the disposal of the members of the Law School at various times during 
the year. 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL OF LAW IN SIX YEARS. 

A regular course in the College is strongly recommended. During 
his Senior year of the College a student is permitted to elect one half- 
year's work from the course in the School of Law, for which he will re- 
ceive credit in his college course. By this arrangement, the student, by 
reasonable extra work, may finish both the College and the School of 
Law in six years and one Summer Session. 

COURSES OF LAW IN THE SUMMER SESSION. 

A Summer Session of the Law School is held each year, beginning im- 
mediately upon the close of the regular session and lasting six weeks. 
The class periods during the Summer Session are one and one-half hours, 
thus giving the same amount of class instruction as is given to the topics 
taught in the regular sessions. The topics taught in the Summer Session 
are: Criminal Law, Agency, Torts, Insurance, Partnership, Wills, or 
Negotiable Instruments. Any person taking work in a Summer Session 
may select any two of the subjects given. 

For further details, see Summer Session Section of Catalog, under 
"Law"; and "Description of Courses," in this section. 

SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION. 

It is believed to be proved by experience that, to be thoroughly effi- 
cient, instructional training in law courses must be given by resident 
teachers who give their whole time to instruction. The work of the 
School of Law is under the direction of five resident instructors, supple- 
mented by lectures on special topics by competent men in the actual 
practice of law. 

METHOD OF TEACHING. 

There are in general three methods of class instruction in law — by 
lectures, by textbooks, and by cases. The School of Law at the Uni- 
versity does not pursue any method to the entire exclusion of the others. 
It uses the textbook method very largely for the beginning .classes, and 
makes use of the lecture and case methods more largely as classes ad- 
vance in the course. 

The student is given large opportunity for free discussion of the topics 
in question, and is brought as much as possible into personal touch with 
his instructor. 

PRACTICE COURTS. 

There are three practice courts in the School of Law, all of them under 
the immediate supervision of the member of the Faculty who devotes the 
major part of his time to this work. The sessions are held in the court 
room, which has been fitted with all the furniture to be found in court 
rooms in actual practice. Ample accommodations are furnished for judge, 
jury, and practitioners. 

THE FIRST-YEAR PRACTICE COURT. 

In the first year, preliminary instruction is first given in the analysis 
of opinions, and in the preparation of cases for argument. Following this 
preliminary instruction, court is held under the direction of the member 
of the Faculty in charge. The places of attorneys, clerk, and other court 
officers are filled in rotation by members of the class. Cases involving 
statements of facts are assigned. Written briefs are required to be pre- 



Practice Courts. 281 

sented, served upon the opposing attorneys, and submitted to a court 
composed of two members of the class and the members of the Faculty. 
Written opinions containing full discussion of the legal questions pre- 
sented are required to be handed down by trie student justices. 

THE SECOND-YEAR PRACTICE COURT. 

The aim of the course of the second year is to instruct in the prepara- 
tion of cases before and after they are filed in court. To this end, state- 
ments of fact are given to the members of the class, in accordance with 
which trial briefs of the law and of facts are made, and pleadings 
under the common law, equity and code systems of civil procedure are 
drawn. Each member of the class receives from the instructor in charge 
criticism of the work done. The code practice of the court follows closely 
the practice in the district courts of Kansas. Besides this work, a course 
of lectures is given on instructions to juries and findings of fact. Mem- 
bers of the class are required to draw journal entries, instructions, and 
findings, under direction of the instructor in charge of the course. 

THE THIRD-YEAR PRACTICE COURT. 

The work of the third year is a continuation of the work of the pre- 
ceding two years. The student is taught how to begin and prosecute 
a case in court. The former difficulty of originating facts in practice 
courts has been overcome, and all the testimony of complicated cases is 
placed in the hands of witnesses, who are interviewed by the attorneys 
assigned. The cases are then begun, prosecuted and determined as in 
actual practice. Juries are drawn and impaneled, the evidence produced, 
instructions given, verdicts and judgments rendered as in the justice of 
the peace courts and in the district courts of Kansas. Following this, 
appeals are prosecuted in due course to the supreme court, where briefs 
are filed and arguments made as in the supreme court of Kansas. 

Only four attorneys are assigned to each case, and there are enough 
cases for all members of the class to act as trial attorneys and as at- 
torney in the appellate court. Every member of the Senior class is thus 
given an opportunity to conduct a case as in actual practice. 

Instruction is also given in legal ethics and in office practice. 

For members of the courts a series of lectures on practical topics is 
arranged for the second term of each year. 



282 



The School of Law. 



CURRICULUM, 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES. 



Key: (B.) Professor Bur dick. (G.) Dean Green. (Hu.) Professor Humble. 
Professor Osborn. (R.) Professor Rice. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Time. Hrs. 



First Quarter. 

Contracts (G.) 

Crminal Law (B.) 

Elementary Law (Hu.) .... 
Court, F. (R.) 



Third Quarter. 

Torts, M. W. Th. (O.) 

Sales (B.) 

Bailments (O.) 

Court, F. (R.) 



9:00 
10:00 
11:00 

1:00 



9:00 

9:00 

11:00 

1:00 



Time. 
Second Quarter. 

Contracts (G.) 9 :00 

Agency (Hu.) 10:00 

Torts, Tu. Th. (0) 11 :00 

Court, F. (R.) . ... 1:00 

Fourth Quarter. 

Suretyship (O.) 9 :00 

Damages (Hu.) 10:00 

Domestic Relations (B.) .... 11:00 
Court, F. (R.) 1:00 



(O.) 



Hrs. 

5 
5 
2 



SECOND YEAR. 



First Quarter. 
Common-law Pleading (R.).. 

Insurance (Hu.) 

Equitv, M. W. F. (O.) 

Court, M. W. (R.) 



Time. Hrs. 



Third Quarter. 
Bills and Notes, M. W. F. 

(Hu.) ; 

Trusts, Tu. Th. (Hu.) 

Evidence (G.) 

Code Pleading (R.) 

Court, M. W. (R.) 



8:00 

9:00 

11:00 

1:00 



8:00 
8:00 
9:00 
10:00 
1:00 



Time. Hrs. 



Second Quarter. 

Equity Pleading (R.) 8 :00 

Quasi Contracts (B.) 10:00 

Equity, M. W. F. (O.) 11:00 

Court, M. W. (R.) 1:00 

Fourth Quarter. 
Bills and Notes, M. W. F. 

(Hu.) 8:00 

Trusts, Tu. Th. (Hu.) 8:00 

Evidence (G.) 9:00 

Conflict of Laws (O.) 10:00 

Court, M. W. (R.) 1:00 



THIRD YEAR. 



First Quarter. 

Real Property (B.) 

Roman Law (B.) , 

Corporations (O.) , 

Court, Tu. Th. (R.) , 



Time. Hrs. 



9:00 

9:00 

10:00 

1:00 



Third Quarter. 

Real Property (B.) 

Roman Law (B.) 

Partnership (Hu.) 

Constitutional Law (G.) . . . . 
Court, Tu. Th. (R.) 



Time. 
Second Quarter. 

Real Property (B.) 9 :00 

Roman Law (B.) 9:00 

Corporations (O.) 10:00 

Bankruptcy, Tu. Th. (Hu.).. 11:00 
Court, Tu. Th. (R.) 1:00 

Fourth Quarter. 

Wills (B.) 10:00 

Constitutional Law (G.) 11:00 

Court, Tu. Th. (R.) 



Hrs. 

4 
1 
5 

2 



The School of Law. 283 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



FIRST- YEAR COURSES. 

1. — Elementary Law. First semester, first half, daily, at 11. An 
analytical study of the elements of jurisprudence; a historical examina- 
tion of the systems of English and American common law and equity; an 
exemplification of common-law theories in the law of trespass; conver- 
sion. Pound's History and System of Common Law. Humble. 

2. — Criminal Law. First semester, first half, daily, at 10. Com- 
mon-law and statutory offenses; parties in crime; classification and 
elements of the specific offenses; criminal procedure; jurisdiction, arrest, 
extradition, examination and bail, indictment, trial, evidence, proceed- 
ings after verdict, error, appeal. Clark and Marshall on Criminal 
Law; lectures; selected cases; drawing indictments. Burdick. 

3. — Contracts. First semester, daily, at 9. The formation of con- 
tracts; offer and acceptance; form and consideration; capacity of parties; 
reality of consent;, legality of objects; operation of contracts; limits of 
contractual obligations; assignment of contracts; discharge of contracts, 
by agreement, by performance, by breach, by operation of law. Clark, 
Benjamin, and Messing's Cases. Green. 

4. — Agency. First semester, second half, daily, at 10. Creation 
and termination of relation; evidence of appointment; ratification; con- 
struction of authorizations; execution of authority; right, duties, and 
liabilities of principal, agent, and third party inter se; particular classes 
of agents. Wambaugh's Cases on Agency. Humble. 

5. — Torts. First semester, second half, Tu. Th., at 11; second 
semester, first half, M. W. F., at 9:30. General principles of liability 
in tort; intent and negligence; proximate cause; active misconduct and 
tortious omissions; liabilities of persons occupying certain relations; 
deceit; defamation; justification and excuse; contributory negligence. 
Bohlen's Cases on Tort. Osborn. 

6. — Sales. First semester, second half, daily, at 10. Sales dis- 
tinguished from kindred contracts; formation of the contract; effects of 
the contract; avoidance of the contract; performance of the contract; 
rights of unpaid seller against the goods, including lien and stoppage in 
transitu', remedies upon breach of the contract. Burdick's (W. L.) 
Cases on Sales. Burdick. 

7. — Bailments and Carriers. Second semester, first half, daily, at 
11. Bailments; carriers of goods; carriers of passengers; duty to 
serve; liability of carriers for loss or injury, for delay, for misdelivery; 
limitation of liability; tickets and bills of lading; freight; connecting 
carriers. Green's cases on Carriers. Osborn. 

8. — Suretyship. Second semester, second half, daily, at 9. Forms 
of suretyship; essentials of the contract; statute of frauds; exoneration; 
reimbursement; subrogation; contribution; defenses and discharge of 
surety. Hening's Cases on Suretyship. Osborn. 

9. — Damages. Second semester, second half, daily, at 10. Dam- 
num absque injuria; nominal damages; liquidation of damages; aggra- 
vation and mitigation; exemplary damages; compensatory damages; 
nonpecuniary losses; damages in specific actions. Mechem and Gilbert's 
Cases. Humble. 

10. — Domestic Relations, or Family Law. Second semester, second 
half, daily, at 11. Husband and wife; marriage, effect of marriage; 



284 The School of Law. 

statutory modifications of the common law; the wife's separate property; 
Community property; separation and divorce. Parent and child; paren- 
tal rights and duties; filial duties. Guardian and ward: common-law, 
chancery, and statutory guardians; rights and duties of guardians; man- 
agement and sale of the ward's property; guardian's accounts. Infants: 
general principles governing the contracts, torts, crimes, and general 
juristic capacity of minors. Master and servant; general principles. 
Woodruff's Cases. Burdick. 

11. — Practice Court. First and second semester, F., at 1. (For 
synopsis see supra in this announcement.) Rice. 

SECOND-YEAR COURSES. 

12. — Common-law Pleading First semester, first half, daily, at 8. 
The development of courts and of systems of pleading; an analytical 
and historical study of remedies at common law, including ancient modes 
of trial; forms of actions; parties to actions; order of proceeding; plead- 
ings; production of issue; forms of traverse; demurrers; materiality, 
unity and certainty in pleading. Case book. Rice. 

13. — Insurance. First semester, first half, daily, at 9. The theory 
of insurance with reference to fire, marine, accident, and life risks; 
the legal relation of the parties to the insurance contract examined 
historically and critically, with a view to developing the fundamental 
principles of the contract and the law merchant underlying it; interpre- 
tation and construction of the standard policies. Wambaugh's Cases; 
Humble's Text. Humble. 

14. — Equity. First semester, M. W. F., at 11. Nature of equity 
jurisdiction; specific performance of contracts; relief for and against 
third persons; incidents of the right Jo specific performance; bills for an 
account; relief against torts; bills of interpleader; bills quia timet; 
reformation and rescission for mistake. Ame's Cases on Equity Jurisdic- 
tion. Osborn. 

15. — Equity Pleading. First semester, second half, daily, at 8. 
Equity courts; parties; bills; multifariousness and impertinence; nature 
and office of demurrers, pleas, answers and replications; decrees; peti- 
tions for rehearing and bills of review; modifications by the new federal 
equity rules. Cases on Equity Pleadings, and the New Federal Equity 
Rules. Rice. 

16. — Quasi Contracts. First semester, second half, daily, at 10. 
Origin and nature of quasi contracts; distinguished from contracts and 
tort; right of recovery upon a record; right of recovery upon a stat- 
utory, official or customary duty; right of recovery upon unjust enrich- 
ment; general principles governing unjust enrichment, including money 
paid under mistake, constraint, duress, or compulsion. Woodruff's Cases. 

Burdick. 

17. — Bills and Notes* Second semester, M. W. F., at 8. The 
law merchant; delivery; form and requisites; maker's contract; ac- 
ceptor's contract certified paper; drawer's contract; indorser's contract; 
presentment and demand; notice; protest; accommodation parties; right 
of holder ; defenses ; payment. Smith and Moore's Cases. Humble. 

18. — Trusts. Second semester, Tu. Th., at 8. Trusts distinguished 
from other legal relationships; language necessary to create; considera- 
tion; statute of frauds; subject matter of trusts; nature of cestui's 
interest; transfer of trust res; extinguishment; duties of trustee. 
Ames' Cases. (2d ed.) Humble. 

19. — Evidence. Second semester, daily, at 10. The nature and 
principles of evidence; the rules which govern the production of testi- 
mony; instruments of evidence. Hughes on Evidence; Wigmore's Cases. 

Green. 



Description of Courses. 285 

20. — Code Pleading. Second semester, first half, daily, at 10. Its 
relation to the common-law and equity systems; parties; splitting and 
joinder of causes of action; general rules of pleading; contents of 
complaint or petition, answer, and reply; nature and office of demurrers, 
motions, and bills of particulars; amendments; construction of pleadings. 
Sunderland's Cases. Rice. 

21. — Conflict of Laws. Second semester, second half, daily, at 10. 
General rules; domicile; capacity; property; obligations; family law; 
inheritance; foreign administration. Beal's Cases. Osborn. 

22— Practice Court. First and second semester, M. W., at 1. (For 
synopsis see supra in this announcement.) Rice. 

THIRD-YEAR COURSES. 

23. — Real Property. First semester, M. W. Th., at 9; second se- 
mester, first half. Nature of real property and tenure thereof; feudal 
land law. Rights in real property; estates; law of landlord and tenant. 
Liens upon real property. Acquisition and transfer of real property title 
in general; powers; deeds and their requisites; abstracts of title. Bur- 
dick's Text and Cases on Real Property; practice in conveyancing; ex- 
amination of abstracts of title. Burdick. 

24. — Roman Law. First semester, F., at 9; second semester, first 
half. History and sources; the Twelve Tables; codification; law of per- 
sons; law of things; law of actions; criminal law of Rome; modern de- 
velopment of Roman law into the civil law of Europe and America. In- 
stitutes of Justinian; Howe's Studies in the Civil Law. Burdick. 

25. — Corporations. First semester, daily, at 10. Legal conception 
of a corporation; corporations de jure and de facto; corporate powers; 
ultra vires acts ; subscriptions to stock ; directors ; stockholders ; creditors ; 
promoters; dissolution. Canfield and Wormser's Cases on Private Cor- 
porations. • Osborn. 

26. — Bankruptcy. First semester, second half, Tu 1 . Th., at 11. 
Jurisdiction; who may be bankrupt; petitioning creditors; acts of 
bankruptcy; property which passes to trustee; provable claims; duties of 
bankrupt and trustee; protection, exemptions, and discharge of bank- 
rupt. Williston's Cases. Humble. 

27. — Partnership. Second semester, first half, daily, at 10. Forma- 
tion of a partnership; partnership as to third persons; nature of a 
partnership; power of partners; rights and remedies of creditors; duties 
and liabilities of partners; dissolution of partnership; accounting and 
distribution; limited partnerships. Gilmore's Cases. Humble. 

28. — Constitutional Law. Second semester, daily, ( at 11. Gen- 
eral principles governing the federal and state constitutions; construc- 
tion and interpretation; taxation; police power; eminent domain; civil 
rights; constitutional guaranties; respective powers of state and fed- 
eral governments in the regulation of commerce ; laws impairing the obli- 
gation of contracts; ex post facto laws and retroactive laws. Hall's 
Cases. Green. 

29. — Wills. Second semester, second half, daily, at 10. History 
and form; capacity to make a will; effect of mistake; fraud, undue in- 
fluence; execution; revocation; rules of construction; legacies; probate of 
wills; duties of executors. Gardner on Wills; selected cases. 

Burdick. 

30. — Practice Court. First and second semester, Tu. Th., at 1. (For 
synopsis see supra in this announcement.) Rice. 



286 The School of Law. 

course for mining engineering students. 

Mining Law. A course outlining the laws relating to the mining 
industries. Lectures and recitation, one hour per week, second semester, 
in alternate years. (Given in 1919- , 20.) Costigan's Cases on Mining 
Law. Mining engineering students must take this course before grad- 
uating. Humble. 



SECTION VII. 

School of Pharmacy. 



(287) 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

Lucius E. Sayre, Ph. M., Dean, and Professor of Pharmacy and Materia 
Medica. 

Edgar H. S. Bailey, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Erasmus Haworth, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

William C. Stevens, M. S., Professor of Botany. 

Eugenie Galloo, A. M., Professor of Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

L. D. Havenhill, Ph. M., Secretary, and Professor of Pharmacy and 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Frederick E. Kester, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Hamilton P. Cady. Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Noble P. Sherwood, Professor of Bacteriology. 

Ole 0. Stoland, Ph. D., Professor of Physiology. 

Frank B. Dains, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Henry C. Thurnau, Professor of German. 

George E. Coghill, Ph. D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Frederick N. Raymond, A. M., Associate Professor of English. 

Herman C. Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

C. Ferdinand Nelson, Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry. 

Ulysses G. Mitchell, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles M. Sterling, A. B., Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy. 

George N. Watson, Ph. C, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, in charge 
of Drug Laboratory. 

Walter S. Long, A. M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, in charge of 
Food Laboratory. 

George W. Stratton, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

L. E. Sayre, Chairman. 
L. D. Havenhill. Chas. M. Sterling. 

(289) 



19— K. U.— 5419. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION. 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Kansas was established 
by legislative enactment in 1885. The purpose of the School is to give 
instruction and practical training in all branches connected with the sci- 
ence and art of pharmacy. 

The three general divisions of instruction embrace pharmacy, theo- 
retical and practical; chemistry, general and analytical, the latter includ- 
ing pharmaceutical chemistry; and materia medica, including its sub- 
divisions of botany (systematic and histologic), pharmacognosy (mac- 
roscopic and microscopic), therapeutics, and toxicology. 

DEGREES. 

The School offers three curricula, one of two, three, and four years; 
leading, respectively, to the following degrees: Graduate in Pharmacy; 
Pharmaceutical Chemist; Bachelor of Science. 

ADMISSION. 

There are two methods of admission to the School of Pharmacy: 
First, by examination; second, by certificate. 

1. By Examination. Time and place of examination for subjects 
required for admission to the School of Pharmacy are the same as for 
admission to the College. For schedules, see General Information Sec- 
tion, p. 52. 

2. By Certificate. Candidates for admission to the two-, three- 
and four-year courses must comply with the requirements for admission 
to the College, viz. : four years of approved high-school work, except that 
students of mature years who have had two or more years' drug-store 
experience may be allowed credit on some of the required high-school 
work. For details write to the Secretary of the Faculty. 

Students having entrance deficiences are required to remove them 
during the first year. 

Special Students. Students over twenty-one years of age, not 
candidates for a degree, are admitted to such courses as, in the judg- 
ment of the Faculty, they can pursue with profit. It is hoped that phar- 
macists throughout the state who wish to increase their efficiency will 
avail themselves of the opportunities here offered. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission having certificates from accredited 
schools and all students of the University intending to pursue their 
studies during the ensuing year must present themselves for registra- 
tion at the University on September 15, 16, or 17, 1919. 

Registration at a later date will be permitted only on the payment of 
a fee of one dollar. 

ENROLLMENT. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar, and after 
fees have been paid, students should apply to the Dean for enrollment 
in their classes. Enrollment the first semester occurs September 16 and 
17, 1919, and on the first day of the second semester. 

Enrollment at a later date will be permitted only on the payment of a 
fee of one dollar. 

(291) 



292 The School of Pharmacy. 

fees and expenses. 

(Subject to change.) 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5 . 00 

for non residents of the state 10.00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state, per year 25.00 

for non residents of the state, per year 35 . 00 

Diploma fee 5 . 00 

In addition to the above fees students pay for the material used and 
the apparatus broken in the various laboratory courses. This varies 
with the economy of the student. It ranges from $12 to $15 for the first 
year and from $23 to $25 for the second year. 

REGISTRATION— STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY. 

Graduates of the School of Pharmacy may become registered pharma- 
cists in Kansas without examination upon presenting to the State Board 
of Pharmacy satisfactory evidence of having had the following amount 
of practical experience in drug stores where physician's prescriptions are 
compounded : 

Thirty months for graduates of the two-year course. 

Twenty-one months for graduates of the three-year course. 

Twelve months for graduates of the four-year course. 

For detailed information apply to the State Board of Pharmacy. 

POSITIONS FOR GRADUATES. 

An adjunct to the Pharmaceutical Society has been established, of 
which the aim is to secure positions for graduates, and clerks for em- 
ployers who are graduates of the School. At present the demand for 
clerks is greater than the supply. Applications for positions should be 
placed with the Secretary of the Faculty. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The School of Pharmacy occupies the first two floors and basement 
of the east wing of the Chemistry and Pharmacy Building. The building 
is arranged specifically for laboratory purposes for the departments of 
chemistry and pharmacy. 

Laboratory instruction for pharmacy students is also given in the 
laboratories of the following departments: Chemistry, bacteriology, 
botany, mineralogy, physiology, and physics. 

Apparatus. For the various practical courses offered by this School a 
large amount of laboratory apparatus of domestic and foreign types 
is supplied. The various laboratories are equipped for manufacturing 
purposes, so that any preparation of the United States Pharmacopoeia 
can be made by any of the official methods; and, in addition, appliances 
and materials are at hand for the unofficial and extra-pharmacopceial 
products. 

The lecture table is abundantly supplied with illustrative apparatus, 
so that the student may see before him the various processes in operation 
which may be carried on in the laboratories and at the prescription 
counters. Care has been taken to illustrate pharmacy in all its phases. 

Collections. The pharmacy School possesses an extensive herbarium 
of medical plants, together with a collection of photographs represent- 
ing nearly 200 species. This, in conjunction with the large herbarium of 
the botanical department, is available to students. Several hundred 
miscrocope slides are at hand for use with the projection lantern, show- 
ing various drugs in cross and longitudinal sections, as well as in pow- 
dered form; also a large assortment of lantern slides, illustrating plants, 



Equipment. 293 

drugs, prescriptions, pharmacies, and places and subjects of pharma- 
ceutical interest; several cases of crystal models; an extensive collection 
of official and unofficial salts, alkaloids, drugs and medicines, besides 
numerous smaller collections of particular interest. 

Library. The School possesses an extensive library, and is the regu- 
lar recipient of the leading pharmaceutical journals and periodicals of 
America, England, Germany, and France. 

For the convenience of students in chemistry and pharmacy a branch 
library is provided in the building and adjacent to the chemical and 
pharmaceutical laboratories, where the principal reference books and 
periodicals may be found. 



294 The School of Pharmacy. 



THE CURRICULUM. 



Three definite curricula are provided: 

The Two-year Curriculum is confined to pharmaceutical work and 
is designed to meet the requirements of those students who have had 
one or more years of experience in a drug store and who wish to further 
qualify themselves for the work of the retail pharmacy. 

The Three-year Curriculum is especially recommended to those stu- 
dents who have had no drug-store experience, and to those who desire a 
broader course of training than that afforded by the two-year course. 
Special opportunities are offered in this course for work in the field of 
drug standardization and analysis. 

The Four- year Curriculum prepares the student for graduate work. 
It is especially recommended to all who aim to be food and drug an- 
alysts, municipal chemists, biological chemists, sugar chemists, etc. ;. and 
allows a liberal choice of electives in the physical, chemical, and bio- 
logical groups. 

Connected with the School of Pharmacy is the state laboratory for 
drug analysis, which affords unusual opportunities for those who are 
especially interested in governmental and state positions. 

Choice of Electives should be tentatively made and submitted to the 
Faculty by the beginning of the Junior year. 

Requirements for Graduation. Students desiring to graduate from 
the four-year curriculum are required to be in residence and regularly 
registered in the School of Pharmacy during their Senior year, and to 
have completed the prescribed courses of study with a minimum of 120 
hours total credit, including electives, and with grade of A, B or C in at 
least 80 hours. 

TWO-YEAR SCHEDULE. 

first year. 

First Semester. 
Course. Time. Hours credit. 

Materia Medica I 1:30-2 :30, M. W. F 3 

Pharmacal Botany 10 :30-12 :30 

Inorganic Chemistry 9 :30-10 :30, 

8:30-10:30, 

Introductory Pharmacy ' 1 :30- 4:30, 

Second Semester. 

Qualitative Analysis 9 :30-10 :30, Tu. Th 5 

1:30- 3:30, M. W. F 

Pharmaceutical Arithmetic 9 :30-10 :30, M. W. F 3 

Pharmacognosy 10 :30-12 :30, M. W. F 5 

* 10:30-11:30, Tu. Th 

Official Pharmacy 11 : 30-12 :30, Tu. Th 2 

1:30- 3:30, Tu. Th 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Semester. 

Inorganic Medicinal Chemicals 9 :30-10 :30, M. W. F 3 

Manufacturing Pharmacy 9 :30-10 :30, Tu. Th 4 

1:30- 4:30, Tu. Th 

Quantitative Analysis 1 :30- 4 :30, M. W. F. . 3 

Materia Medica II 10:30-11 :30, M. Tu. W. F 4 

Toxicology 10:30-11 :30, F 1 



M. 


W. 


P 








M. 

Tu 


W. 
Th. 

Th 


F 








Tu 











Courses of Study. 



295 



Secoxd Semester. 
Course. Time. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 8:30-11 :30, 

General Review of Pharmacy 10 :30-ll :30, 

Drug Store Management 10 :30-ll :30, 

Materia Mediea III 10 :30-12 :30, 

Organic Chemistry 1:30 2 :30, 

1:30- 3:30, 
Prescription Practice 2 :30- 4:30, 





Hours credit 


Tu. Th 


2 


M. W. ... 




2 


F 




1 


M. W. F. 




3 


M. W. F. 




5 


Tu. Th. . . 






M. W. F. 




2 



THREE-YEAR SCHEDULE. 



Course. 

Rhetoric EI 

Inorganic Chemistry 



M. 
M. 

Tu. 



W. F. 
W. F. 
Th. . 



FIRST YEAR. 
First Semester. 
Time. 

1:30- 2:30, 

8:30-10:30, 

9:30-10:30, 

Pharmacal Botany . . 10:30-12:30 

Introductory Pharmacy 1:30- 4:30, Tu. Th 

Second Semester. 

Rhetoric E-II 8 :30- 9 :30, 

Pharmaceutical Arithmetic 9 :30-10:30, 

Foreign Language 10 :30-ll :30 

Official Pharmacv 11 :30-12 :30, 

1:30- 3:30, 
Qualitative Analysis 9 :30-10 :30, 

1:30- 3:30, 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Semester. 

Materia Mediea I 9:30-10 :30, M. F. W. 

Bacteriology 10 :30-12 :30 

Manufacturing Pharmacy 9 :30-10 :30, 

1:30- 4:30, 
Quantitative Analysis 1 :30- 4:30, 



Tu. 


Th. . 


M. 


W. F 


Tu. 


' Th. ' . 


Tu. 


Th. . 


Tu. 


Th. . 


M. 


W. F 



Tu. Th. . 
Tu. Th. . 
M. W. F. 



Second Semester. 



Hours credit. 
3 



Pharmacognosy 



10 :30-12 :30, M. W. F 5 



10 :30-ll :30, Tu. Th 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 8 :30-ll :30, Tu. Th 2 

Organic Chemistry 1:30- 3 :30, Tu. Th 5 

1:30- 2:30, M. W. F 

Prescription Practice 2 :30- 4 :30, M. W. F 3 

THIRD YEAR, 

First Semester. 

Inorganic Medicinal Chemicals 9 :30-10 :30, M. W. F 3 

Materia Mediea II 10 :30-ll :30, M. Tu. W. Th 4 

Toxicology 10:30-11:30, F 1 

Foreign Language 5 

Elective* 2 

Second Semester. 

Microanalysis of Drugs 8 :30-10 :30 5 

General Review of Pharmacy 9:30-11:30, 

Drug-store Management 9 :30— 11 :30, 

Materia Mediea III 11 :30--12 :30, 

Elective* 



W. 



W. F. 



4 or 5 



* In the choice of electives the student is required to confer with his faculty adviser. 
A student may not elect more than eighteen hours in each semester without special per- 
mission from the Faculty. Choice of electives should be tentatively made and submitted 
to the Faculty by the beginning of the Junior year. 



296 



The School of Pharmacy. 



FOUR-YEAR SCHEDULE. 

FIRST YEAR. 
First Semester. 
Course. Time. 

Rhetoric EI 1:30-2 :30, M. W. F. 

Pharmacal Botany 10 :30-12 :30 

Inorganic Chemistry 9:30-10:30, M W F 

T 4 - , ^ 1:30- 3:30, Tu. Th. '. 

Introductory Pharmacy 1 :30- 4 :30, Tu. Th. 

Second Semester. 

Rhetoric E-II 8:30-10:30, Tu. Th. . 

Pharmaceutical Arithmetic 9 :30-10 :30, M. W. F 

Qualitative Chemistry 9 :30-10:3o] Tu Th 

1:30- 3:30, M. W. F. 

Pharmacognosy 10 :30-12 :30, M. W. F. 

rtJB . , ■ 10:30-11:30, Tu. Th. . 

Official Pharmacy 11 :30-12 :30, Tu. Th. . 

1:30- 3:30, Tu. Th. . 



Hours credit. 

3 

5 

5 



SECOND YEAR. 

First Semester. 

Mathematics I 8 :30- 9 :30, M. W. F 3 

Materia Medica I 9 :30-10 :30, M. W. F 3 

Foreign Language 5 

Quantitative Analysis 1 :30- 4 :30 5 

Second Semester. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 8 :30-ll :30, Tu. Th 2 

Mathematics II 2 

Organic Chemistry 1 ;30- 3 :30, Tu. Th. .' . . .' . . .' .' .' . . .' 5 

Foreign Language 1 :30- 2 :30, M. W. F 5 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Semester. 

Inorganic Chemicals 9 :30-10 :30, M. W. F. 3 

Bacteriology , , , -. 10 :30-12 :30 ....'. 5 

Manufacturing Pharmacy 9 :30-10 :30, Tu. Th 4 

1:30- 4:30, M. W. F 

Elective* 5 

Second Semester. 

Microanalysis of Drugs and Spices 8:30-10:30 5 

Physcis 5 

Prescription Compounding 2 :30- 5:30 3 

Elective* 2 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Semester. 

Materia Medica II 10:30-11:30, M. Tu. W. Th 4 

Toxicology 10:30-11:30, F 1 

Physics 5 

Elective* 5 



Second Semester. 

General Review 10:30-11:30, M. 

Drug-store Management 10:30-11:30, F 

Materia Medica III 11 :30-12 :30, M. W. F. 

Elective* 



W. 



* In the choice of electives the student is required to confer with his faculty adviser. 
A student may not elect more than eighteen hours in each semester without special per- 
mission from the Faculty. Choice of electives should be tentatively made and submitted 
to the Faculty by the beginning of the Junior year. 



The School of Pharmacy. 297 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES.* 



ANATOMY. 

Professors: Coghill, . 

M7. — Histology and Splanchnology. Five hours credit. 

Coghill and assistants. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

Professor : Sherwood. 

Instructors: Treece, Downs, Irwin. 

50. — General Bacteriology. Five hours .credit. Both semesters. 
Prerequisite, chemistry 1, or equivalent. Fee, $5. 

Sherwood, Treece, Downs. 
53. — Bacteriology of Foods. Five hours credit. Second semester. 
Prerequisite, course 50. Fee, $5. Treece. 

54. — Special Methods in Bacteriology. Five hours credit. First 
semester. Prerequisite, course 50. Fee, $5. Downs. 

55. — Bacteriology of Soils. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Treece. 
57. — Immunity. Five hours credit. Second semester. Prerequisite, 
course 50. Fee, $5. Sherwood. 

Pathogenesis. Five hours credit. Second semester. Prerequisites, 
course 50 and animal history. Offered in 1919-'20. Fee, $5. 

Sherwood. 

61. — Special Problems in Bacteriology. Two to ten hours credit. 
Either semester, by appointment. Prerequisite, course 50. Fee, $1, for 
each hour of enrollment. 

Sherwood and the instructor directly concerned. 

BIOCHEMISTRY. 

Professor : Nelson. 
Instructor : 



50. — Biological Chemistry. Four or six hours credit. Second se- 
mester, M. W., 1:30 to 4:30; F., 1:30 to 5:30; Tu. Th., 1:30 to 2:30. A 
course embracing a fundamental study of the chemistry of epithelial, 
connective, muscular, and nervous tissues. A study of enzymes and 
enzyme action, proteins, fats and carbohydrates. The qualitative and 
quantitative composition of milk, saliva, blood, bile, peptic and pancre- 
atic juices. Designed to meet the needs of pharmacists and those pur- 
suing courses in food analysis, hygiene, and home economics. Required 
in the four-year pharmacy course. Open as elective for others having 
necessary prerequisites. ■ Nelson and assistants. 

* C E. or M., before the number of the course indicates that it is offered by the 
College, School of Engineering, or School of Medicine, respectively. 

Courses numbered from 1 to 49 are Freshman and Sophomore courses; from 50 to 99 
are Junior and Senior courses; from 100 to 149 are offered only in the Graduate School; 
from 150 to 200 are Junior and Senior as well as Graduate courses. 

Days of Meeting. Courses giving five hours credit meet daily from Monday to Fri- 
day, inclusive. 

Courses giving three hours credit meet on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, unless 
otherwise specified. 

Courses giving two hours credit meet on Tuesday and Thursday, unless otherwise 
specified. 



298 The School of Pharmacy. 

. 52. — Urinalysis. Two hours credit. Elective. Second semester, 
hours by appointment. The qualitative and quantitative examination of 
normal and pathological urine. Nelson. 

51. — Advanced Biological Chemistry. Two or more hours credit. 
Throughout the year. Conferences and reports on selected topics. 

Nelson. 

53. — Colloid Chemistry. Two hours credit. First semester. A 
study of colloids and the colloidal state of matter. Special emphasis 
is laid on the applications of colloid chemistry to problems in biochem- 
istry. Nelson. 

101. — Research in Biological Chemistry. Two or more hours credit. 
Throughout the year. Nelson. 

102. — Biochemical Seminar. Weekly meetings. Prerequisite, a 
reading knowledge of French and German. Discussion and reports on 
current biochemical literature. Nelson. 

BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY. 

Professors : Saver, Stevens. 
Assistant Professor: Sterling. 

1. — Pharmacal Botany. Five hours credit. First semester, 10:30 to 
12:30. A study of plant tissues, histological technique; the general 
forms of the flowering plants, and the preparation and preservation of 
specimens. Laboratory work, lectures, and recitations. Sterling. 

2. — Pharmacognosy. Five hours credit. Second semester; M. W. 
F., 10:30 to 12:30; Tu. Th., 10:30 to 11:30. An introduction to tax- 
onomy; a study of the geographical distribution, origin and physical 
characteristics of crude vegetable drugs, and elementary technique in 
the examination of powdered drugs. Laboratory work, lectures, and reci- 
tations. Prerequisite, course 1 or course 6. Sterling. 

51. — Microanalysis of Powdered Drugs and Foods. Five hours 
credit. First semester, 8:30 to 10:30. Methods in sectioning and stain- 
ing, the preparation of powders, and microscopical examination. Lab- 
oratory work, lectures, and recitations. Prerequisite, course 2. 

Sterling. 

52. — Advanced Work in Microanalysis of Drugs and Foods. Two, 
three, or five hours credit. First or second semester, by appointment. A 
course designed to meet the needs of students preparing to be drug and 
food analysts. Method in plant histology; michrochemical technique, and 
quantitative determination of adulterants. Laboratory work and recita- 
tions. Sterling. 

C2. — The Living Plant, What it Teaches about Life and Its Uses. 
Five hours credit. First semester. Stevens. 

C4— Plant Histology. Five hours credit. First semester. Pre- 
requisites, course 1 in the College, course 2 in the College, course 1 in 
the School of Pharmacy, or its equivalent. Stevens. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professors : Bailey, Cadv (Chairman of the Department), 

Dains. 
Associate Prof essors : Allen, Stratton,* Faragher.* 
Assistant Professors : Long, Estes, Brewster, Elsey, 

Wertheim. 
Instructors : Berger, Murray, Rader, Lange. 

2. — Inorganic Chemistry. Five hours credit for students presenting 
high-school chemistry for entrance; six hours for students who have had 
no chemistry. Lectures and recitations M. W. F., 8 or 9. For the six- 
hour credit there will be an additional recitation at 3:30 Thursday or 
9:30 Saturday. Laboratory work, Tu. Th., 8:30 to 10:30 or 1:30 to 3:30. 

Cady, Elsey and assistants. 

* Absent on leave. 



Description of Courses. 299 

3. — Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis Five hours 
credit. Second semester. Lectures and recitations, Tu. Th., 8 or 9. 
Laboratory, M. W. F., 8 to 10, or 1 to 3. Prerequisite, course 2. 

Cady, Elsey, and assistants. 

49. — Quantitative Analysis. Two, three or five hours credit. Both 
semesters, 10 to 12. Prerequisites, courses 2 and 3. 

Allen and assistants. 

51. — Quantitative Analysis I. Two, three, or five hours credit. Both 
semesters, 10 to 12, or 1 to 3. A general course covering the funda- 
mental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analyses. Prerequisite, 
course 3. Allen and assistants. 

52. — Quantitative Analysis II. Two, three, or five hours credit. 
Both semesters, 1 to 3, or by appointment. In connection with this work 
some specialty, such as cement, glass, or packinghouse industry, rock 
analysis, paint analysis, etc., may be pursued. Prerequisite, course 51. 

Allen and assistants. 

52A. — Sanitary Water Analysis. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 10 to 12. Laboratory work in the sanitary analysis of water and 
sewage. Lectures and assigned readings on the interpretation of results 
and upon the methods used. Especially designed to fit students for com- 
mercial positions in this line of work. Prerequisite, course 51. 

Allen. 

52C. — Gas Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. A laboratory course of general gasometric methods, analysis of 
flue gases, artificial and natural gases. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52D. — Food Analysis. Three hours credit. Both semesters, by ap- 
pointment. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61, 
or 62. Long. 

52E. — Oil Analysis. Two hours credit. First semester, by appoint- 
ment. The examination of petroleums and products, lubricating oils, 
asphalts, and road materials. Prerequisite, course 51. Allen. 

52G. — The Chemistry of Milling and Baking. Two hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. Designed to meet the requirements 
of chemists desiring to carry on control work in the milling industry. 
Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61, or 62. Estes. 

52H. — Industrial Organic Analysis. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Includes analysis of soap, paper, leather, 
starches, etc. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61, or 62. Estes. 

60. — Chemistry of Food Products. Five hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, 3 to 5. A general course for students interested in food supply. 
It includes a study of the source, composition, adulteration, and use of 
foods. Special attention is also given to the world's supply of foods, and 
its manufacture and preparation for the market. Prerequisite, course 1. 

Bailey. 

61. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit. Both 
semesters, 1 to 3. Designed to cover briefly the aliphatic and aromatic 
series, to discuss the more important derivatives and to show their rela- 
tionships and applications. Prerequisite, ten hours chemistry. 

Dains, Brewster. 

62. — Organic Chemistry I. Five hours credit. First semester, M. 
W. F., at 9. Laboratory, Tu. and Th. mornings or afternoons. For 
College and Engineering students who wish a more detailed knowledge 
of organic chemistry. In this course the aliphatic series only is dis- 
cussed, the aromatic series being reserved for organic chemistry 63. Pre- 
requisite, ten hours chemistry. Dains, Brewster. 

63. — Organic Chemistry II. Five hours credit. Second semester, M. 
W. F., at 9. Laboratory, Tu. and Th. mornings or afternoons. Aro- 
matic series. Prerequisite, course 62. Dains, Brewster. 



300 The School of Pharmacy. 

70. — Physical Chemistry I. Five hours credit. First semester, at 
10. A course paying special attention to electrochemistry. Lectures, 
recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisites, course 3 and satisfactory 
preparation in general physics and calculus. Cady. 

71. — Physical Chemistry II. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
at 10. A general course in theoretical and physical chemistry. Lectures, 
recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisites, courses 1, 2, 3, 51, 61 or 
62, and satisfactory preparation in general physics and calculus. 

Cady. 

80. — Inorganic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours, credit. Second 
semester, at 11. A study of the inorganic industries, including such 
topics as the manufacture of acids, alkalies and other chemicals, ferti- 
lizers, paints and pigments, glass and cement, and the purification of 
water. Prerequisites, courses 1, 2, and 3 Estes. 

81. — Organic Industrial Chemistry. Three hours credit. First 
semester, at 9. A study of the organic industries, including such topics 
as the refining of petroleum, the distillation of wood and coal, packing 
houses, fermentation, soaps, leather, paper, starches, sugars, dyestuffs, 
etc. Prerequisites, courses 1, 2, 3, and 61 or 62. Estes. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Associate Professor : Raymond. 
Instructors : , . 

El. — Rhetoric I. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 

Raymond and assistants. 

E2. — Rhetoric II. Two hours credit. Second semester at 8:30. 

Raymond and assistants. 

59. — Advanced Composition. Three hours credit. Both semesters; 
first semester at 8:30 and 9:30. Practice in gathering and analyzing 
material, and in the presenting of information and opinion in written 
papers. Elective in Junior or Senior year. Raymond. 

FRENCH. 

Professor : Galloo. 

Associate Professor : Neuen Schwander. 
Assistant Professors: Stanton, Mahieu. 
Instructors: Cram, Hess, Owens, Perry. 

1. — Elementary French I. Five hours credit. Both semesters. 

Neuen Schwander, Stanton, Mahieu, Cram. 

2. — Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit. Both semesters. A 
continuation of course 1. Neuen Schwander, Stanton, Cram, Perry. 

5. — Scientific French. Three hours credit. First semester, by ap- 
pointment. Prerequisites, courses 1 and 2. Owens. 

51. — Elementary French I. Five hours credit. First semester, 
10:30. For Juniors and Seniors who are beginning French. Galloo. 

52. — French Reading and Grammar. Five hours credit. Second 
semester. A continuation of course 51. Galloo. 

GEOLOGY. 

Professor : Haworth. 

Associate Professor: Moore. 

Assistant Professors: Todd, Haynes, Ellisor. 

2 (or 2a,). — Elementary Geology. Three hours credit. Both se- 
mesters. Prerequisite, Geology 1. This course must be accompanied 
by 2b. Moore, Haynes. 

2b. — Introductory Historical Geology. Two hours credit. Both 
semesters. Prerequisite, Geology 1. This course must be accompanied 
by 2 (or 2a). Moore. 



Description of Courses. 301 

german language and literature. 

Professors: Engel, Titurxav. 
Associate Professor: Corbin. 

1. — Elementary German. Five hours credit. First semester, 10:30; 
second semester, 1:30 to 3:30. Engel, Thurnau, Kruse. 

2. — German Readings and Grammar. Five hours credit. Both se- 
mesters, 9:30. Thurnau, Kruse. 

3A. — Intermediate German. Five hours credit. Both semesters, 
9:30. Engel, Thurnau. 

4A. — German Classics. Three hours credit. Both semesters, 11:30. 

Engel. 

3B. — Scientific German. Five hours credit. First semester, 8:30. 
Open to students who have had German 1 and 2. ■ Kruse. 

4B. — Scientific German. Three hours credit. Second semester, 8:30. 
Planned as a continuation of course 3B, but is open to students who have 
had* 3A. Kruse. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Professors: Van der Vries, Ashton- . 
Associate Professors : Mitchell, Stouffer. 
Assistant Professors : Jordan, Wheeler, Lefschetz. 
Instructors : Marm, Black. 

2a. — College Algebra. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 

Stouffer, Marm. 
3a. — Plane Trigonometry. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 

Stouffer, Black. 
4. — Analytical Geometry I. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 

Stouffer. 
5. — Calculus I. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 

Ashton, Mitchell. 
6. — Analytical Geometry II. Two hours credit. Both semesters. 

Ashton, Mitchell. 
7. — Calculus II. Three hours credit. Both semesters. 

Mitchell, Stouffer. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

Professors : Sayre.. Havenhill. 

1. — Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Two, three or five hours credit. 
Second semester, 8:30 to 11:30. A course embracing the fundamental 
analytical operations necessary in determining the strength and purity of 
drugs and medicines. Havenhill. 

2. — Plant Analysis. Two and one-half or five hours credit. Elec- 
tive. Either semester, by appointment. The separation and estimation 
of the proximate principles of plants. Must be preceded by chemistry 4 
and 54, or chemistry 4 and pharmaceutical chemistry 1. 

Sayre, Havenhill. 

3. — Analysis of Nostrums. Five hours credit. Elective. Either se- 
mester, by appointment. Must be preceded by pharmaceutical chemis- 
try 3. Sayre. 

3. — Analysis of Drugs. Five hours credit. Elective. Either se- 
mester, by appointment. This is a companion course to food analysis 
(see chemistry 58) and is arranged especially for students who desire 
to qualify as food and drug analysts. Must be preceded by chemistry 4 
and 54, or chemistry 4 and pharmaceutical chemistry 1. Havenhill. 



302 The School of Pharmacy. 

pharmacy and materia medica. 

Professors : Sayre, Havenhill, Bailey. 

I. — Introductory Pharmacy. Two hours credit. First semester, 
Tu. Th., 1:30-4:30. Lectures and recitations. The history of the Phar- 
macopoeia and a study of the apparatus and processes employed in the 
preparation of medicines. Havenhill. 

2. — Pharmaceutical Arithmetic. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter; M. W. F., 9:30. A study of weights, measures, specific gravity, and 
the principles of pharmaceutical arithmetic. Lectures and recitations. 

Havenhill. 
3. — Official Pharmacy. Two hours credit. Second semester, Tu- 
Th., 11:30-12:30, 1:30-3:30. A systematic study of the official prepara- 
tions, including their classifications, preparation, and preservation. Must 
be preceded by course 1. Lectures and recitations. Havenhill. 

4. — Inorganic Medicinal Chemicals. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, M. W. F., 9:30. The source, manufacture, physical properties, 
general and specific characteristics and identity of inorganic substances 
used in medicine. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Must be 
preceded by introductory chemistry. Havenhill. 

5. — General Review of Pharmacy. Two hours credit. Senior; sec- 
ond semester, Th., 10:30. A synoptic review of the essentials of phar- 
macy, chemistry, and materia medica. Havenhill. 

6. — Drug Store Management. One hour credit. Senior; second se- 
mester, Tu. 10:30. A lecture course with collateral reading relating to 
the legal and business problems confronting the retail pharmacist. 

Sayre, Havenhill, Watson, and invited lecturers. 
7. — Library Work Hours by appointment, second semester (b). 
Specially designed to familiarize the student with pharmaceutical litera- 
ture; will include exercises in indexing and reviewing. Sayre. 

8. — Manufacture of artificial fruit essences and other compound 
ethers. Sayre. 

9. — Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. Hours by appointment. A 
study of the laws pertaining to pharmacy in different states, and to the 
laws pertaining to the mercantile business, together with practical busi- 
ness suggestions. A course of not less than ten lectures, given in con- 
nection with the Pharmaceutical Society. 

10. — Elementary Accounting. Hours by appointment. A course of 
lectures covering the principles of accounting applicable to the business 
of pharmacy. Given under the supervision of the Department of Eco- 
nomics and Commerce. 

11. — Introductory Pharmacology. One hour credit. First semester, 
Thur., 1:30-3:30. A course designed for medical students, embracing 
metrology, and the processes and apparatus used in the preparation of 
medicines, including the elements of prescription writing and a brief 
outline of the official preparations. Havenhill. 

50. — Manufacturing Pharmacy. Four hours credit. Senior; first 
semester, Tu. Th., 9:30 to 10:30, 1:30 to 4:30. Practical work in the 
manufacture of standard medicinal preparations, as contained in the 
Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. Laboratory work and reci- 
tations. Must be preceded by Pharmacy 1, 2, 3, 4, and Botany 1. 

Havenhill and assistant. 
51. — Prescription Practice. Three hours credit. Senior; second 
semester, M. W. F., 2:30 to 4:30. Compounding of prescriptions and a 
practical study of incompatibilities. Lectures and laboratory work. Pre- 
requisite, course 50. Havenhill and assistant. 



Description of Courses. 303 

12. — Materia Medica I. Three hours credit. First semester, M. W. 
F., at 9:30. The classification and therapeutic effects of drugs and medi- 
cines. Sayre and assistant. 

52. — Materia Medica II. Four hours credit. Senior; first semester, 
10:30. A critical study of the drugs and preparations of the U. S. 
Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. Lectures and recitations. 

Sayre. 

53. — Materia Medica III. Three hours credit. Senior; second semes- 
ter, M. W. F., at 11:30. The classification, physical description and 
chemical constitution of the crude drugs of the pharmacopoeias; their 
chemical and physiological properties, and therapeutic application; 
methods of prescribing and dispensing; the action of organic and in- 
organic chemicals and their physiological relationships. Lectures and 
recitations. Sayre. 

54. — Toxicology. One hour credit. Senior; first semester, F., 10:30. 
Lectures on the sources, properties, methods of detection, and antidotes 
for poisons. Must be preceded by fifteen hours of chemistry. Bailey. 

55. — Thesis Five hours credit. Senior; second semester. Original 
research in one of the subjects connected with the pharmaceutical pro- 
fession. An outline of the work should be presented to the Dean by the 
first of the second semester. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

Professor : Kester. 

Associate Professor : M. E. Rice. 

Assistant Professors : Stimpson, T. T. Smith. 

2. — Development of Physics. Five hours credit Kester. 

3a. — General Physics. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Smith. 

3b. — General Physics. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Smith. 

4a. — General Physics Laboratory. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester. Smith. 

46. — General Physics Laboratory. Two hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Smith. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY. 

Professor: Stolaxd. . 

Ml. — Physiology and Pharmacology. Five hours credit. Second se- 
mester. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. A course dealing 
with the action of the more important drugs and the physiology of the 
organs that are .especially involved in such action. Stoland. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES. 

Through the Correspondence-Study Department of the Extension Di- 
vision, pharmacy is offered, as follows: (1) courses for those who wish to 
become registered assistant pharmacists or registered pharmacists; (2) 
a program of studies indorsed by the Kansas State Board of Pharmacy, 
and leading to a correspondence certificate; (3) technical courses in in- 
troductory pharmacy, organic materia medica, and pharmacy physi- 
ology. 

For details, see University Extension Division announcements, under 
"Pharmacy." 



304 The School of Pharmacy. 

food and drug analysis. 

The legislature in 1905 passed a bill making it the duty of the chem- 
istry departments of the University and the State Agricultural College, 
under the direction of the State Board of Health, to make analyses of 
samples of foods, drugs and beverages collected by any county or city 
board of health of the state of Kansas and to make reports upon the same. 

For details of the work, see Section XII of the Catalog. 

For The Pharmaceutical Society, see General Information Section of 
Catalog, under "University Organizations." 



SECTION VIII. 

The School of Medicine. 

(305) 



20— K. U.— 5419. 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 

FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

Samuel J. Crumbine, M. D., Dean. 

Mervin T. Sudler, Ph. D., M. D., Associate Dean and Professor of 
Surgery. 

Edgar H. S. Bailey, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Lucius E. Sayre, Ph. H., Professor of Pharmacy. 

L. D. Havenhill, B. S., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Don C. Guffey, A. M., M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Lindsay S. Milne, 1 M. B., M. D., Professor of Medicine. 

Peter T. Bohan, M. D., Professor of Medicine. 

Bennet M. Allen, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

Ole 0. Stoland, Ph. D., Professor of Physiology and Experimental 
Pharmacology. 

Frank B. Dains, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Ralph H. Major, 1 A. B., M. D., Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 

George E. Coghill, Ph. D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Jacob Block, M. D., Professor of Genito-urinary Surgery. 

Samuel S. Glasscock, M. D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Joseph E. Sawtell, 2 M. D., Professor of Otorhinolaryngology 

Iasdore Julias Wolf, M. D., Professor of Medicine. 

Franklin E. Murphy, M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Lyman L. Uhls, M. D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Edward J. Curran, M. D., D. Opth., Professor of Ophthalmolgy. 

C Ferdinand Nelson, Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Physiological Chemis- 
try. 

George M. Gray, 1 M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Andrew L. Skoog, Ph. D., Professor of Neurology. 

Richard L. Sutton, M. D., Professor of Dermatology. 

William L. McBride, 1 M. D., Professor of Dermatology. 

Noble P. Sherwood, B. S., M. D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Arthur E. Hertzler, Ph. D., M. D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Robert M. Schauffler, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

John J. Sippy,"' M. D., Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine. 

William K. Trimble, M. D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Orval J. Cunningham, M. D., Associate Professor of Surgery (Anes- 
thetics) 

Charles A. Haskins, 1 B. S., Associate Professor of Sanitary Engineer- 
ing. 

1. On leave for military service. 

2. Died, March, 1919. 

3. Resigned, April, 1919. 

(307) 



308 The School of Medicine. 

Robert D. Irland, 1 M. D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

William F. Kuhn, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of Neurology. 

Clarence B. Francisco, 1 A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Nadine Nowlin, A. M., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John G. Hayden,i M. D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Edward P. Hall, 1 M. D., Assistant Professor of Rhinolaryngology. 

Thomas G. Orr, 1 A. B., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Donald R. Black, 1 A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Charles C. Dennie, 1 M. D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

Herbert F. Van Orden, 1 M. D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology and 
Obstetrics. 

Sam E. Roberts, 1 M. D., Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology. 

Joseph E. Welker, B. S., M. of C. E., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Eugene Smith, M. D., Demonstrator in Anatomy. 

Clifford C. Nesselrode, 1 M. D., Instructor in Clinical Surgery. 

William A. Wilson, 1 M. D., Instructor in Genito-urinary Surgery. 

Frank Ridge, 1 M. D., Instructor in Medicine (Physical Diagnosis). 

Joseph B. Cowherd, M. D., Instructor in Medicine (Pediatrics). 

George L. Harrington, 1 M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Joseph L-. McDermott, M. D., Instructor of Roentgenology. 

Harvey P. Boughnou, 1 M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Wilson A. Myers, M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Laurence A. Lynch, M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

William S. Spicer, M. S., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Edgar E. Pickens, M. D., Assistant in Ophthalmolgy. 

Nelse F. Okerblad, A. B., M. D., Assistant Instructor of Surgery 
(Genito-urinary). 

Virgil W. McCarty, 1 M. D., Assistant in Otorhinolaryngology. 

Fred C. Rumsey, M. D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Darwin W. Delap, M. D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

Herbert S. Valentine, 1 M. D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Lena M. Smith, A. B., Technical Assistant in Bacteriology and Path- 
ology. 

Jessie R. Newsom, Technician in Anatomy. 

Eleanor M. Kibbey, A. B., Secretary and Assistant Registrar. 

Evelyn Stanton, A. B., Librarian. 

S. Milo Hinch, Superintendent of Bell Memorial Hospital and Super- 
visor of Nurses. 

Elizabeth Talle, Cashier and Clerk of the Bell Memorial Hospital. 

Ada G. Ehrman, R. N., Assistant in Operating Room. . 

Kate Noble, R. N., Assistant in the Dispensary. 

Edith McKee, R. N., Assistant in Roentgenology. 

Mary Edna Darland, A. B., M. D., Assistant in Otorhinolaryngology. 

Otto Jason Dixon, 1 A. B., M. D., Dispensary Attendant. 

John L. Myers, A. B., M. D., Dispensary Attendant. 

1. On leave for military service. 



Faculty. 309 

administrative committee. 

S. J. Crumbine, D. C. Guffey, 

M. T. Sudler, J. E. Sawtell, 

L. E. Sayre, F. E. Murphy, 

O. 0. STOLAND, E. J. CURRAN, 

P. T. Bohan, W. K. Trimble, 

George E. Coghill, F. B. Dains, 
R. H. Major. 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



HISTORY. 

In the act of the legislature establishing the University (1862) the 
founding of a School of Medicine was contemplated, but conditions were 
such that it was impossible to carry out these plans at this time. How- 
ever, steps were taken, as opportunity offered, to further the formation 
of a School of Medicine, and in 1880 the "Preparatory Medical Course," 
under the administration of the College, was established. This continued 
until 1899, when the School of Medicine was definitely organized, and the 
first two years of medical instruction were offered. 

In the fall of 1905 the Kansas City Medical College (founded in 
1869), the Medico-chirurgical College founded in 1896), and the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons (founded in 1893), were merged into the last 
two years of a four-year medical course under direction of the University 
of Kansas. This was made possible through a gift to the University of 
some tracts of land in and about Rosedale, Kan., by Dr. Simeon B. Bell, 
in memory of his wife, Eleanor Taylor Bell. The work was first given 
in the laboratory and lecture rooms of the building which had formerly 
belonged to the College of Physicians and Surgeons and a dispensary was 
conducted in the building of the Medico-chirurgical College. In January, 
1907, the school was moved to the new buildings which had been erected 
in Rosedale, on the land referred to above. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The Faculty. The faculty of the School of Medicine includes mem- 
bers who give instruction in the work of the first year and a half at 
Lawrence, and those giving instruction in the work of two and one-half 
years at Rosedale. 

The Administrative Committee. The administrative committee of 
the School of Medicine has charge of matters affecting the School as a 
whole, subject to the rules of the Board of Administration. It is ap- 
pointed annually by the Chancellor. 

The Work at Lawrence. The work of the first year and a half is 
given at Lawrence. It consists of the fundamental scientific branches: 
anatomy, neurology, histology, embryology, physiology, pharmacology, 
chemistry, bacteriology, etc. The medical students haVe all the advan- 
tages of the University laboratories, libraries, museums, and lectures. 

Students should matriculate and register for the first year and a half 
at Lawrence. 

The Work at Rosedale. The work of the last half of the second year 
and the third and fourth years is intended largely to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the various manifestations of diseases and their treatment. 
Much of the work is done by the bedside, and the student has an oppor- 
tunity to observe all the processes of making a diagnosis and prescribing 
the treatment. 

DEGREES.* 

The degree of doctor of medicine has been granted to those satis- 
factorily completing the work of the four-year medical curriculum. 

After September 1, 1919, the degree of M. D. will be conferred only upon 

, ^ 

* For a detailed statement of the rules and regulations of the School of Medicine tb> 
student is referred to the special bulletin containing them. 

(311) 



312 The School of Medicine. 

students completing a fifth interne year under faculty supervision. The 
faculty of the School of Medicine determines the standards, examinations, 
curriculum, etc., leading to the degree of doctor of medicine, and may 
change these from time to time as necessary or desirable. 

Candidates for the degree of doctor of medicine may, under the plan 
for a six-year curriculum explained below, receive from the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences the degree of bachelor of arts, or the degree of 
bachelor of science in medicine. 

The following plan has been arranged with the College: 

College students who have attained at least full Senior standing and 
who have credit for certain subjects named below may offer in satisfac- 
tion of all or part of the requirement of the Senior year the entire first 
year of the medical curriculum. To such students the College will grant 
the degree of bachelor of arts. 

College students who have attained at least full Junior standing and 
who^ have credit for certain subjects named below may offer in satis- 
faction^ all or part of the requirements of the Junior and Senior years 
the entire first and second years of the medical curriculum. To such stu- 
dents the College will grant the degree of bachelor of science in medicine. 

The subjects or equivalents, which must have been completed before 
admission to the Medical School are: 

Modern language, 10 hours, preferably German I and II. 

Chemistry, 10 hours, including I and II. 

Physics I, 5a and 56, and 6a and 6b. 

Biology, which should include zoology III and one course selected from 
zoology I, II, and botany III. 

To secure this privilege of offering medical work towards the College 
degree, the student must have spent one full year in residence at the 
College before entering upon his medical studies, and must be certified 
to the Medical School by the Dean of the College as having met all the 
requirements above named. He must also register in the College as well 
as the Medical School and be subject to such general regulations of the 
College Faculty as govern other Juniors and Seniors. 

A student who does not fully meet the entrance requirements to the 
Medical School will enroll in College clases necessary to complete such 
requirements, after which he may be admitted to the Medical School and 
enrolled in medical courses, but the aggregate number of hours of such 
enrollment in the two schools may not exceed that allowed to College 
students. 

Whenever a student has completed the medical work in accordance 
with the foregoing provisions, the Dean of the Medical School will sub- 
mit to the Dean of the College a certified statement of that fact accom- 
panied by the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Medicine 
that such student be admitted to the appropriate College degree. The 
name of the candidate will then be sent to the College Faculty as that of 
a candidate for that degree. 

Proportion of High Grades Required for Degrees. 

I. A student in order to be accepted for the degree of bachelor of 
science in medicine must have received a grade of I or II, or of A, B, or C, 
in at least 90 hours. See College Section of Catalog for details. 

II. A student in order to be accepted for the degree of doctor of 
medicine must have received the grades of A, B, or C, in at least three- 
fourths of the hours required for graduation. This is effective for all 
work done after September, 1918. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

For entrance into the School of Medicine a student must have com- 
pleted sixty hours (two years) of work in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences of the University of Kansas, or work equivalent thereto. 



Registration. 313 

The student who has completed the first two years of college work in 
another school, and who desires to enter the Medical School, should send a 
certified transcript of his work to the chairman of the committee on ad- 
vanced standing-, or the Registrar of the University. A rating will then 
be given on this work, showing the exact terms on which he will be 
admitted. 

Students who do not meet the requirements will not be enrolled as 
medical students. College students, however, may enroll in certain medical 
courses recognized by the College. 

This preliminary college work must include the following: 

English 5 hours. 

Chemistry 14 hours. 

Physics 10 hours. 

Biology 10 hours. 

Modern Language 10 hours. 

For description of courses, see alphabetical list in College Section of 
Catalog. These or their equivalent will be accepted. 

The minimum requirement' in chemistry is general and qualitative 
chemistry, but the student is strongly advised to include in his pre- 
liminary work a course in qualitative analysis. If time permits, some 
work in. quantitative analysis should be done, as it affords an excellent 
preparation for physiological chemistry. 

The physics requirements include at least 10 hours of college physics. 
Courses 5a and 56 and 6a and 66 may be oifered. Both the latter courses 
are highly recommended. 

The minimum requirement in biology is zoology III (comparative 
anatomy) and one course selected from zoology I, zoology II, and 
botany III. 

In languages, at least German I and II should be presented/ The 
student however is strongly advised to complete German I, II, III, and 
French I and II. French I and II will be accepted for the minimum 
language requirement. 

Optional Work. 

For the rest of the two years' college work, courses in history, eco- 
nomics, and psychology are advised, in order to give the student as broad 
a foundation as possible for his technical studies in the Medical School. 

The group and percentage grade requirements in the College must be 
fulfilled. The above-named courses, as a rule, fit in with these group 
requirements. Every prospective medical student is urged to consult the 
Associate Dean or the Secretary or any member of the committee on 
entrance and advanced standing of the School of Medicine in regard to 
this preparatory work. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

Credit for work of collegiate or professional standing is granted only 
on recommendation of the committee on entrance and advanced standing. 
For regulations governing the granting of such credit see "Admission to 
Advanced Standing," Section I, page 52. 

REGISTRATION. 

All candidates for admission having certificates from accredited schools 
and all students of the University intending to pursue their studies dur- 
ing the ensuing year must present themselves for registration at the 
University on September 15, 16, 17. Registration at a later date will be 
permitted only on special permission of the faculty and the payment of 
a fee of one dollar. 



314 The School of Medicine. 

enrollment. 

After registration has been completed with the Registrar, and fees 
have been paid, students should apply to the Dean for enrollment in 
their classes. Enrollment the first semester occurs September 16, 17, 
and on the first day of the second semester. Enrollment at a later 'date 
will be permitted only on special permission of the faculty and the pay- 
ment of a fee of one dollar. 

In order to obtain the degree of doctor of medicine it is necessary 
to be regularly enrolledl in the School of Medicine for at least four full 
years. 

FEES. 

First and Second Years. 

Matriculation fee, for residents of the state $5.00 

for nonresidents 10 . 00 

Incidental fee, for residents of the state ....!! 25! 00 

for nonresidents 35 . 00 

Diploma fee, at graduation 5 ] 00 

Microscope fee 6 . 00 

Laboratory fees, to cover cost of material used, will be charged by 
the different departments. The amount of these fees will average about 
$80 a year. 

All laboratory fees must be paid before enrollment in classes. Re- 
ceipts for the same will be required by class instructors before admitting 
students to class. 

Third and Fourth Years. 

Students who register in the department at Rosedale, not having been 
previously enrolled as students of the University of Kansas, are required 
to pay the regular matriculation fee — for residents of Kansas, $5; for 
nonresidents, $10. 

InJ addition to the matriculation fee each student pays $100 for each 
school year, $50 at the opening of each semester. This amount includes 
the incidental fees of $25 and $35 per annum required by law, and fees 
to meet, in part, the necessary hospital and clinical expenses. 

Students will also be required to rent a microscope ($3 per semester) 
and to pay the actual cost of materials and apparatus of every kind con- 
sumed, wasted, lost, or broken. A stock room is provided where students 
may purchase any additional material needed, or they may secure the 
same, if they prefer, in the open market, provided the form and grade 
of such articles are approved by the instructor in charge. 

Outside Occupation. It is not advisable to attempt to carry full work in the 
Medical School and to engage in outside occupation. If it is necessary for students to 
earn a portion of their expenses while in school a longer time will be required to complete 
the course. Should students for any reason be unable to carry full Avork, they may, at the 
discretion of the Associate Dean, be withdrawn from certain courses. 

EQUIPMENT. 

Laboratory. For the work of the first two years of the medical course 
at Lawrence the scientific equipment of the University is available. The 
greater part of the work of the first two years is of a purely scientific 
character, and most of the student's time is spent in laboratories. The 
instruction is given by men who devote themselves entirely to teaching. 

The Laboratory Building at Rosedale contains teaching laboratories, 
private laboratories for instructors, the necessary lecture rooms, morgue 
and specimen rooms, animal rooms, business offices, and the library. The 
museum contains more than one thousand specimens, preserved in Kaiser- 
ling's fluid. A sufficient number of microscopes is provided so that 



Equipment. 315 

each student has his own microscope. However, students are urged to 
■purchase their own microscopes in their first year. 

Library. The library at Rosedale is a part of the general University 
library and is managed as such. The files of periodicals have been care- 
fully selected, with a view to training the student to use the best in 
current medical literature. There is a collection of reprints and disserta- 
tions. Carefully selected monographs and textbooks are added from 
year to year. 

Hospital. The hospital has acccommodations for sixty-five patients. 
Clinical material is furnished, first, by free patients (the expense being 
met by legislative appropriation) who are sent in from the dispensary 
or by the heads of the departments; second, by county cases which are 
sent in under the laws passed by the legislature permitting counties to 
send their charity cases to this hospital for treatment, the counties pay- 
ing the actual expenses incurred; third, by patients who can afford to pay 
hospital fees and who are admitted as clinical patients on presenting a 
letter from their family physician stating that they cannot afford to pay 
for professional services and are recommended for free treatment. 

Internes; are appointed out of every graduating class to serve in the 
hospital. The internes are selected by the Administrative Committee 
from the applicants who have made the highest average in their work 
during the last two years. 

Dispensary. The out-patient department is housed in the Dispensary 
Building. It is a two-story fire-proof building, containing a drug room, 
a laboratory, a lecture room, a waiting room, and consultation rooms. 
It is open from 10 to 12 a. m. and from 2 to 4 p. m., Sundays and holidays 
excepted. Here students have an opportunity to study and examine am- 
bulant patients under competent supervision in the clinic. 

Opportunities in City Hospitals. Instruction is also given at St. 
Margaret's Hospital of Kansas City, Kan., by permission of the Sisters 
who control the institution. Its capacity is three hundred beds. Fourth- 
year students spend three mornings a week in this hospital. The school 
is allowed similar privileges by the authorities of Mercy Hospital, where 
instruction in pediatrics and orthopedics is given. 



316 



The School of Medicine. 



CURRICULUM, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



First Semester (at Lawrence) : 

Anatomy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 — Human Dissec- 
tion and Osteology. 
Anatomy 7 — Histology and 

Splanchnology. 
Organic Chemistry. 



Second Semester (at Lawrence) : 
Anatomy 1, 2, 3, 4 — Dissection. 
Anatomy 8 — Embryology. 
Anatomy 9 — Neurology. 
Physiological Chemistry. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



First Semester (at Lawrence) 
Physiology 1. 
Materia Medica. 
Bacteriology. ' 
Toxicology. 
Parasitology. 
Pharmacology. 



Second Semester (at Rosedale) : 
Pathology 3. 

Anatomy 6 — Topographical. 
Experimental Pharmacology 1, 
Materia Medica, Pharmacology 
Medicine 2, 3. 
Surgery 1, 2. 
Obstetrics 1. 
Hygiene. 

Ophthalmology 1. 
Pediatrics. 



First Semester: 

Medicine 4, 5, 6. 
Surgery 3, 5, 7, 12. 
Obstetrics 2. 
Pathology 4. 
Ophthalmology 2. 
Pediatrics 1. 



First Semester: 

Medicine 10, 11. 
Surgery 10, 12, 13, 14 
Obstetrics 7, 8. 
Neurology 2, 3, 4. 
Pediatrics 3. 
Otorhinolaryngology 
Ophthalmology 3. 



JUNIOR YEAR. (At Rosedale.) 

Second Semesters 

Medicine 4, 5, 7, 8, 13. 
Surgery 4, 7, 8, 9. 
Obstetrics 3, 4. 
Ophthalomology 2. 
Neurology 1. 
Otorhinolaryngology 1, 2. 
Pediatrics 2. 
Hematology, Serology. 
Dermatology. 

SENIOR YEAR. (At Rosedale.) 

Second Semesters 

Medicine 10, 11, 13. 
15, 17. Surgery 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17. 

Gynecology, Obstetrics 7, 8. 
Neurology 2,- 3. 
Dermatology 2. 
3, 4. Pediatrics 3. 

Otorhinolaryngology 3, 4. 
Opthalmology 3. 



Description, of Courses. 317 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



ANATOMY. 



Professors: Coghill, . 

Instructors: Smith, Spicer. 
Technician : Jessie R. Newsom. 
Custodian and Preparafor : Stone. 



The department of anatomy includes gross anatomy (dissection) his- 
tology, embryology, and neurology. The laboratories are located in the 
basement of the Museum of Natural History, and are thoroughly 
equipped with apparatus, specimens, models, charts and materials for 
both elementary and advanced instruction. Research is encouraged and 
good facilities for it are provided. 

It is the aim of the department to present the gross and microscopic 
phases of anatomy in close correlation with each other, and in the light 
of embryological development. While the work is done under close super- 
vision of instructors, independence of observation and thought on the 
part of the student is encouraged and expected. 

Ten hours of biology (zoology and botany) or their equivalent are 
prerequisites for all courses in anatomy. The biological training should 
include comparative anatomy of vertebrates. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Human Anatomy 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The student dissects the entire 
human body with the aid of textbooks, atlases, guides, and models. The 
dissections are observed closely by instructors, who give examinations 
upon regions and parts as completed. Credit for the entire course is 
given only after the student has passed final written and practical ex- 
aminations. Coghill, Smith, . 

1. — Dissection of the Arm and Thoracic Wall. Three hours credit. 
Fee, $5. 

2. — Dissection of the Leg, Perineum and Abdominal Wall. Three 
hours credit. Fee, $5. 

3. — Dissection of the Thoracic and Abdominal Viscera. Four 
hours credit. Fee, $5. 

4. — Dissection of the Head and Neck. Four hours credit. Fee, $5. 

5. — Human Osteology. One hour credit. A systematic study of the 
human skeleton. Supplemented by drawings, clay modeling, etc. 

Smith, . 

6. — Topographical Anatomy. Two hours credit. A laboratory course 
in human anatomy, including dissections, study of models, preparations, 
cross sections. The practical phases are emphasized. Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 
and 5 are prerequisites. (At Rosedale.) Fee, $5. 

7. — Histology and Splanchnology. Five hours credit in the College. 
A systematic study of the tissues and organs of the body, with intro- 
ductory emphasis on the structure and function of the cell. Fee, $5. 

Coghill, Spicer, . 

8. — Embryology and Embryogeny. Two hours credit. A study par- 
ticularly of the germ layers and the development of the organs of the 
body with the aid of serial sections, dissections, and models. Fee, $3. 

Coghill, Spicer, . 

9. — Neurology. Three hours credit. A study of the central nervous 
system by means of dissections and microscopic methods, particularly 
with reference to the better-known nerve centers and conduction paths. 
Fee, $3. Coghill, Spicer, . 



318 The School of Medicine. 

10. — Advanced Anatomy. By appointment. This course is open, by 
appointment, to graduates and others who are prepared to work upon 
special anatomical subjects with a considerable degree of independence. 
Prerequisites, anatomy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. . 

11.— Seminar. Advanced students and physicians are admitted to a 
seminar in which subjects of current interest in anatomy are discussed. 
Prerequisites. Anatomy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. Coghill, . 

Total Hours of Instruction in Work Required, 1,008. Gross 
anatomy, 720; neurology, 72; histology, 144; embryology, 72. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

Professor ; Dains. 

61. — Organic Chemistry. Five hours College credit. First semester, 
M. W. F., 1:30 to 2:30; laboratory, Tu. Th., 1:30 to 4:30. Lectures, re- 
citations, and laboratory. A general introductory course in organic chem- 
istry, covering the most important classes of organic compounds, with 
their preparation, properties, and uses. Required of students who have 
not completed it in the preliminary college work. Fifty-four hours lec- 
ture and recitation, 108 hours laboratory work. Dains. 

ZOOLOGY. 

Professor ; Allen. 

Assistant Professor : Nowlin. 

1. — Parasitology. Two or three hours credit. First semester; lec- 
tures, M. and W., at 1; laboratory, F., 1 to 3. This course deals with the 
animal parasites of man, and is especially designed for the needs of 
medical students and those interested in public-health problems. Pre- 
requisite, 1 or equivalent. Allen, Nowlin. 

BIOCHEMISTRY. 

Professors: Sayre, Nelson. 
Instructor : . 

50. — Biological Chemistry. Six hours credit. A survey of the field 
of biochemistry adapted to the needs of medical students. Lectures, con- 
ferences, laboratory work. Prerequisites, general and organic chemistry. 
Six hours college credit. Fifty-four lectures, 162 hours laboratory work. 

Nelson .and . - 

51. — Advanced Biological Chemistry. Conferences and reports on 
selected topics. Two or more hours credit. Throughout the year. 

Nelson. 

53. — Colloid Chemistry. Two hours credit. First semester. A study 
of colloids and the colloidal state of matter. Special emphasis is laid on 
the applications of colloid chemistry to problems in biochemistry. 

Nelson. 

101. — Research in Biological Chemistry. Two or more hours credit. 
Throughout the year. Nelson. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

Professor : Sherwood. 

Instructors: Trkkce, Downs, Irwin. 

50. General Bacteriology. Five hours credit. First semester, 9:30 

to 5:30. Laboratory work with recitations and a course of lectures on the 
relation of bacteria to public-health problems. The laboratory work deals 
with the preparation of media, cultural methods, diagnostic tests, prepa- 
ration of vaccines, and an intimate study of important pathogenic organ- 
j sms Sherwood, Treece, Irwin. 



Description of Courses. 319 

53. — Bacteriology of Foods. Five hours credit. Second semester, 
1 to 3. Bacteriological examination of milk, oysters, meat, etc. 

Treece, Irwin. 

57. — Immunity. Five hours credit. Second semester, 10 to 12. 
Laboratory study of precipitins, agglutinins, bacteriolysins and com- 
plement fixation. Sherwood, Downs. 

61. — Special Problems in Bacteriology. Two to ten hours credit. 
Either semester, by appointment. Special work along some definite line 
with a view to obtaining familiarity with a particular kind of labora- 
tory procedure. Sherwood. 

INTRODUCTORY PHARMACOLOGY, MATERIA MEDICA, AND 

TOXICOLOGY. 

Professors: Sayre, Nelson, Bailey. 

The courses offered in this department are especially designed to 
meet the requirements of medical students, special emphasis being given 
to the properties, action, and uses of the more important medical agents 
and poisons. 

1. — Introductory Pharmacology and Materia Medica. (At Law- 
rence.) Two hours credit. First semester, Th., at 1:30. This course 
embraces the study of weights, measures, processes used in the prepara- 
tion of medicines, illustrated by exercises in the pharmaceutical labora- 
tory; prescription writing; and physical properties and identification of 
cirude drugs. Nelson. 

2. — Introductory Pharmacology and Materia Medica. (At Law- 
rence.) Three hours credit. First semester, at 2:30, M. T., and W. 
Classification, chemical and physical properties of drugs, therapeutical 
application, method of prescribing and dispensing, the action of organic 
and inorganic chemicals and their physiological relationships. Lectures 
and recitations. Required of second-year students. Must be preceded by 
course 1. Three hours, fall term, at 11:30. Sayre. 

3. — Introductory Pharmacology and Materia Medica. (At Rose- 
dale.) Two hours credit. Second semester, Friday, at 11 and at 1:30 
A continuation of couse 2. Sayre. 

4. — Laboratory Work in Pharmacology. (At Lawrence.) Two or 
more hours credit. The facilities for pharmaceutical investigation of a 
practical character are made necessary by the intimate connection of the 
drug laboratories with the State Board of Health. Investigation of the 
physiological action of drugs and chemical analysis of active (toxic) 
principles. Either semester by appointment. , Sayre. 

5. — Toxicology. One hour credit. First semester, Friday, at 9:30. 
Lectures on the sources, properties, methods for detection, and antidotes 
for poisons. Bailey. 

Total Hours of Instruction, 144. Introductory pharmacology, 54; 
materia medica, 72; toxiology, 18. 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. 

Professor ; Crumbine. 

Associate Professors : SlPPY, HASKINS. 

For a number of years the relations existing between the University 
of Kansas and the Kansas State Board of Health have been very close 
and intimate. The water, food, and drug laboratories of the Board are 
at the University, the work of analysis being done by the University 
men. The engineers of the State Board of Health are the engineers of 
the University. Much of the research and investigation undertaken by 
the State Board of Health has been through the cooperation of the 
Faculty of the University. 



320 The School of Medicine. 

It is becoming more and more apparent that preventative medicine is to 
have an increasingly important place in the education and culture of the 
future physician. 

The close relations between the State Board of Health and the Uni- 
versity of Kansas have made it easy to bring about the more or less 
unique relationship that exists between the School of Medicine of the 
University and the State Board of Health, which, in effect is the union 
of the curative and preventive agencies of the state. 

Realizing the importance of a fundamental understanding of the value 
of preventive medicine, not only to practitioners of medicine, but in 
training public-health officers, the School of Medicine has created a sepa- 
rate Department of Preventive Medicine, at the head of which is the 
Dean of the School, who is the secretary of the State Board of Health. 

1. — Public Health. One hour credit. Second year, second semester, 
Wednesday at 11. 

(a) Sanitary engineering, water supplies, sewage collection, purifi- 
cation and disposal, sanitary architecture, plumbing, ventilation, public 
buildings, schools, hospitals, dwellings, etc. 

(b) Special sanitation of public institutions, of transportation, school 
hygiene, rural, occupational, and other special sanitation. 

2. — Public Health. One hour credit. Fourth year, first semester, 
Wednesday at 11. 

(a) Introductory, historical, definitions and principles, relations of 
hygiene to other sciences and professions. 

(b) Vital statistics, economics of disease, eugenics, other social as- 
pects and problems. 

(c) Immunity, race questions, infection. 

3. — Preventive Medicine. One hour credit. Fourth year, second se- 
mester, Wednesday at 11. 

(a) The study of environment, air, water (including ice and mineral 
waters), milk, dairy hygiene and milk products, other foods, soil, sewage. 

(b) Infectious diseases and their epidemiology (including venereal 
diseases), notifiable diseases. 

(c) Vaccines and protective inoculations.. 

(d) Disinfection and disinfectants. 

(e) Animal parasites. 

(/) Insects and disease, the control of diseases through the control of 
their disseminators. 

(g) Diseases communicated to man by the lower animals. 

(h) Legal and administrative devices for the control of diseases, the 
principles of sanitary law illustrated by the sanitary laws of Kansas, 
quarantine and isolation, health officers and boards (federal, state and 
local), municipal sanitation, pure foods and drugs, hygienic laboratories, 
the education of the public. 

PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Professor: Major. 
Assistant Professor: Baker. 
Technical Assistant : Smith. 

3. General Pathology. (At Rosedale.) Five hours credit. Second 

semester, M. W. F., 8 to 11; Tu., 8 to 10. Lectures, laboratory, and 
recitations. This course is devoted to the study of pathological pro- 
cesses, with especial emphasis on the manner in which lessons are pro- 
duced, considerable time also being devoted to pathological technique. 
Required of second-year students. Major, Baker. 

4. Special Pathology. (At Rosedale.) Two hours credit. Second 

semester, Tu. and F., at 11. Recitations and laboratory. This course 
takes up the study of special pathology, as illustrated by gross and mi- 
croscopic specimens. Required of third-year students. Trimble. 



Description of Courses. 321 

5. — Post-mortem Pathology. (At Rosedale.) Three hours credit. 
Both semesters. Assigned work. Each student is required to see all 
autopsies performed during" his third year. Baker. 

6. — Advanced Bacteriology and Pathology. (At Rosedale.) Open 
to advanced students who have had sufficient preparation. Experimental 
work and original research in all branches of bacteriology, pathology and 
immunology, arranged to suit the needs of individual students. 

Major. 

8. — Gynecological Pathology. Three hours credit. First semester. 
This is essentially a laboratory course, in which the most important 
pathological lesions of the female genital tract are studied from the 
standpoint of gross and microscopic pathology. Required of fourth-year 
students. Major. 

Total Hours of Required Work, 433. General pathology 234, spe- 
cial pathology 108, post-mortem pathology 40, gynecological pathology 51. 

Guffey. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

Professor : Stoland. 
Assistant Professor: Welker. 

1. (College 70). — Physiology. Four hours credit. Second semester, 
Freshman year. Lecture and recitation, M. W. F., at 8:30; laboratory, 
Tu. Th., 8:30 to 11:30. The physiology of blood, circulation, respiration, 
muscle and nerve. Stoland, Welker. 

2. (College 71). — Physiology. Five hours credit. First semester, 
Sophomore year. Lecture and recitations, M. W. F., at 8:30; laboratory, 
Tu. Th., 8:30 to 11:30. The physiology of the central nervous system, 
the senses, the digestive tract, secretion, metabolism, excretion, heat 
regulation, internal secretion. A continuation of course 70. 

Stoland, Welker. 

3. (College 63). — Special Problems in Physiology. Five to seven 
hours credit. Both semesters. A course intended for students who wish 
to pursue special laboratory work or investigation. Stoland. 

4. (College 100). — Original Research in Physiology. Five to ten 
hours credit. Both semesters. Stoland. 

PHARMACOLOGY. 

Professor : Stoland. 
Assistant Professor: Welker. 

1. — Pharmacology. (At Rosedale.) Three hours credit. M. T. F., 
at 9. Sophomore year, second semester, three times a week. Lectures 
and recitations. Didactic instruction which deals primarily with the 
physiological actions of the more important drugs employed in therapeu- 
tics, their uses and methods of administration. Stoland. 

2. — Pharmacology. (At Rosedale.) Two hours credit. Tu. Th., at 1. 
Sophomore year, second semester, two afternoons a week. Laboratory 
instruction illustrating many of the underlying principles considered in 
course 1. Stoland, Welker. 

3. — Pharmacology. Credit to be arranged, the amount depending 
upon the time given to the subject. A course in which students who 
have had courses 1 and 2 and are properly qualified to do advanced work 
in pharmacology are given an opportunity to do independent original 
work. Stoland. 



21— K. U.— 5419. 



322 The School of Medicine. 

medicine. 

Professors: Bohan, Murphy, Wolf, Glasscock, Uhls, 

Skoog, McBride, Sutton. 
Associate Professor: Trimble, Kuhn. 
Instructors: Boughnau, Lynch, Harrington, Myers. 
Clinical Assistants: Cowherd, Dennie, Delap. 

The course in medicine begins in the second half of the second year 
and leads up to the individual study of clinical cases in the fourth year. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. — Physical Diagnosis I. Two hours credit. Second semester, M. W. 

9 to 11. The course consists of demonstrations and practical exercises 
illustrating the simpler methods of physical examination of the normal 
organs, with the exposition of the physical laws involved. It includes also 
instruction in the recording of clinical cases. Demonstrations are also 
conducted in the dispensary and in the hospital for the practical study 
of physical signs of diseases conditions. Trimble, Boughnou. 

2. — Laboratory Diagnosis. Two hours credit. Second semester, Tu. 

10 to 12. In this class students are trained in the methods of examining 
blood, sputum, and throat secretions, gastric contents, cerebrospinal 
fluids, urine, feces, pathological exudates, etc. Trimble. 

THIRD YEAR. 

4. — Systematic Medicine. Two hours credit. Both semesters, Tu. F., 

9 to 10. A systematic course of lectures is given on the diseases of the 
cardiovascular and respiratory systems, the peritoneum, liver, kidney, 
adrenals, thyroid, pancreas, and disorders of metabolism. (Third and 
fourth year.) Bohan. 

5. — Clinical Medicine. Two hours credit. Both semesters, M. Th., 

10 to 11. Ward classes are held twice a week, in which cases are de- 
monstrated, as far as possible, to illustrate the subjects of the lecture 
course at that time. Murphy. 

Ward Work. Students are assigned to cases for individual study, and 
are required to prepare records of these cases and to note the progress 
and treatment of the disease. 

6. — Recitations. In this course students are quizzed on lessons 
assigned in Osier's Practice of Medicine. 

M. Th., 8 'to 9, both semesters; two hours credit. Boughnou. 

W. F., 3 to 4, both semesters, two hours credit. Lynch. 

Sat., 9 to 10, both semesters; one hour credit. Myers. 

7. — Clinical Bacteriology, Serology, and Hematology. Two hours 
credit. Second semester, F., 9 to 12. In this course instruction is given 
in agglutinative and other serum tests, including the Widal and Wasser- 
mann reactions, the bacteriology of pathological exudates, blood cultures, 
vacine therapy and diseases of the blood. Trimble. 

8. — Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines. One hour credit. 
Second semester, S., 9 to 10. A systematic lecture course on diseases of 
the stomach and intestines. Wolf. 

9. — Out-patient Work. Assignments are also made to the different 
dispensary rooms. Each case is allotted to a student, whose duty is to 
prepare the history and to examine the patient, under the direction of 
the physician in charge, who advises the treatment to be carried out in 
each case. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

10. — Clinical Medicine. Eight hours credit. Both semesters, M. 
Th. at St. Margaret's Hospital, Tu. at Bell Hospital, 10 to 12. Clinics 
are given at the bedside and in the dispensary on selected cases. Each of 



Description of Courses. 323 

these cases has previously been studied by one student, who is responsible 
for the history of the case and for a special knowledge of this type of 
disease. Bohan. 

11. — Gastro-Intestinal Diseases. Three hours credit. W. F., 10 
to 12. 

12. — Dietetics. One hour credit. First semester, S., 10 to 11. A lec- 
ture course on the dietetic treatment of disease. Wolf. 

13. — Recitation Course, based on Osier's Practice of Medicine. Two 
hours credit. Both semesters, Tu., at 8; and F., at 1. Harrington. 

PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY. 
third and fourth years. 

1. — Functional and Organic Diseases of the Nervous System. 
One hour credit. First semester, Sat., at 11. Lectures. Required of 
third-year students. Kuhn. 

2. — Psychiatry. One hour credit. F., at 1. Lectures covering the 
following subjects are given: History of insanity, forms of insanity, 
care and treatment of insanity in hospitals, care and treatment of in- 
sanity in general practice, state care of insane, and the relation of 
heredity to insanity. Both terms. Fourth year. Glasscock, Uhls. 

3. — Clinical Neurology and Neuropathology. Two hours credit. 
Both semesters, W., 2 to 4. This course includes practical exercises and 
demonstrations on the pathology of nervous diseases. Clinical demon- 
strations of neurological cases are also conducted, and students are as- 
signed to the practical study of the nervous cases in hospital to be re- 
ported on at the class meeting. Skoog. 

4. — Clinical Neurology. One hour credit. Th., at 9. Demonstra- 
tions of cases at St. Margaret's Hospital. Required of Seniors. 

Skoog. 
DERMATOLOGY. 

third year and fourth year. 

1. — Introductory Course. One hour credit. First semester, Tu., 
at 8. Lectures and recitations. The anatomy and physiology of the 
skin, together with symptomatology, pathology, and clinical manifes- 
tations of the commoner skin diseases. Required of third-year students, 
spring term. Dennie. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

2. — Clinical Dermatology. One hour credit. Both semesters, Sat. 
a. m. Lectures, and demonstrations of the various skin diseases, at the 
Bell Memorial Hospital. Fourth year. Sutton. 

3. — Dispensary Clinics. Tu. Sat., 2 to 4. Dennie. 

PEDIATRICS. 

THIRD YEAR. 

1. — Pediatrics. One hour credit. Third year, first semester, Th., at 1. 
Lectures and recitations on infant feeding. Diseases of malnutrition and 
gastro-intestinal disturbances. Cowherd. 

2. — Pediatrics. One hour credit. Second semester, M. W. Sat., at 1. 
Students are shown normal children as well as abnormal from birth to 
fifteen years of age. Special emphasis is laid on normal and abnormal 
physical findings. Sections limited to four students, This work is given 
in the wards of Children's Mercy Hospital. Cowherd. 



324 The School of Medicine. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

3. — Pediatrics. One hour credit. First semester, M. W. Sat. Con- 
tinuation of course 2. Cases are assigned to students for examination 
and study. Differential diagnosis and treatment are particularly em- 
phasized. Methods of infant feeding are taken up in detail. Children's 
Mercy Hospital. Sections limited to four students. Cowherd. 

SURGERY. 

Professors : Sudler, Block, Gray, Sawtell, Curran. 
Associate Professor* : Hertzler, Cunningham, Schauffler. 
Assistant Professors: Orr, Hayden, Hall, Francisco. 
Instructors : Nesselrode, Okerblad. 
Assistants: Roberts, McCarty, Rumsey. 

Instruction in the principles of the various branches of surgery is 
given by means of lectures, recitations, and assigned subjects. Clinical 
instruction is given in the dispensary, in the Bell Memorial Hospital, and 
in St. Margaret's Hospital. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. — Anesthetics. One hour for nine, weeks during the spring term. 
Lectures and assigned reading. Required of second-year students. Sat- 
urday, at 11. Cunningham. 

2. — Minor Surgery. Two hours credit. Second semester. Instruction 
in bandaging and dressings, at the dispensary. Required of second-year 
students. S., at 9. Orr. 

THIRD YEAR. 

3. — General Surgery. Two hours credit. First semester, M. and Th., 
at 11. Lectures, recitations, conferences, and assigned work. An in- 
troduction to the principles underlying surgical procedure. Required of 
third-year students. Sudler. 

4. — General Surgery. Two hours credit. Second semester, Tu. and 
Th., at 1. A continuation of course 1. Required of third-year students. 

Sudler. 

5. — Fractures and Dislocations. Two hours credit. First semester, 
Tu. and Th., at 9. Lectures and recitations. Required of third-year 
students. Orr. 

7. — Genitourinary Surgery. One hour credit. Both semesters, F., 
at 9. Lectures and recitations. Required of third-year students. 

Block. 

8. — Surgical Pathology. Two hours credit. Second semester, Tu. 
and F., at 2. Required of third-year students. Hertzler. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS. 

9. — Clinical Surgery. At the Bell Memorial Hospital. Two hours 
credit. Spring semester, W., 9 to 12. Required of third-year students. 

Sudler. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

11. — Operative Surgery. Two hours credit. Second semester, W., at 
10. Animal experimentation and work on the cadaver. Required of 
fourth-year students. Hertzler. 

12. — Surgical Conferences. One hour credit. Second semester. 
Papers on assigned subjects. Required of fourth-year students. 

Sudler. 

13. — Electrotherapeutics. One hour credit. Both semesters, F., at 
3, and Sat., at 1. Lectures and demonstrations. Required of fourth- 
year students. McDermott. 

14. — Clinical Surgery. Three hours credit. Both semesters, M. Tu. 
Th., 8 to 12. Assigned in sections. At St. Margaret's Hospital. Re- 
quired of fourth-year students. Gray, Nesselrode. , 



Description of Courses. 325 

15. — Orthopedic Surgery. One hour credit. Both semesters, Sat., 
at 9. Lectures and recitations. Required of fourth-year students. 

Francisco and Schauffler. 
16. — Clinical Surgery. One hour credit. First semester. Instruc- 
tion in the Bell Memorial Hospital. Sudler. 

17. — Orthopedic Surgery. One hour credit. Both semesters, M. W. 
Sat., at 1. Instruction in wards at Mercy Hospital, in sections of four. 

Francisco and Schauffler. 

OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY. 

THIRD YEAR. 

1. — Rhinolaryngology. One hour credit. Second semester, Th., at 
2. The course consists of a review of the anatomy and physiology of 
the parts, a drill in the use of instruments for diagnosis and in the meth- 
ods of examination illustrated by demonstrations on patients; also, of 
lectures, quizzes, and the examination of microscopical specimens. Re- 
quired of third-year students. Sawtell, Hall, Roberts, McCarty. 

2. — Otology. One hour credit. Second semester, M. S., at 11. The 
plan of instruction pursued in the study of diseases of the ear is the 
same as that in the department of nose and throat. Required of third- 
year students. Sawtell, Hall, Roberts, McCarty. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

3. — Rhinolarynology. One hour credit. First semester, Th., at 2. 
This course is a continuation of course 1. Here also the students are 
taught in groups. The subject matter of this course consists of a study 
of the deformities and diseases of the nose and throat and their treat- 
ment. Required of fourth-year students. 

Sawtell, Hall, Roberts, McCarty. 

4. — Clinical Work. M. Tu. W. Th. Sat. Clinical instruction in 
diseases of the ear, nose, and throat is given in the dispensary and by 
hospital clinics by means of direct examination of patients under the 
supervision of instructors, who personally teach each student proper 
methods of examination and the correct interpretation of his observa- 
tions. Sawtell, Hall, Roberts, McCarty. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

1. — Physiological Optics. One hour credit. Instruction is given 
second-year students in physiological optics; vision tests, color tests, the 
taking of the field of vision, etc. Optical boxes, artificial eyes, ophthal- 
moscopes and suitable apparatus are provided for all physiological work 
and study. The course consists of laboratory work and demonstrations 
under the professor of physiology in the regular course in physiology. 

Curran. 

2. — Lectures, Demonstrations, and Clinical Work in Dispensary. 
Two hours credit. Both semesters. The course covers objective and 
subjective examination of the patient, functional testing, diseases, and 
injuries, medical and surgical ophthalmology, and the relation of the eye 
to general diseases. Required of third-year students. Curran. 

3. — Practical Work. Fourth year. One hour credit. Both semes- 
ters. Clinics are given in the Bell Memorial Hospital. The students 
are divided into small sections and each individual has the opportunity 
of closely inspecting the patients suffering from external diseases of the 
eye, of making the commoner applications used in the treatment, of assist- 
ing in the operating room, of studying refractive errors, functional 
testing, etc. Each student is required to become proficient in refrac- 
tion. Curran. 

Total Hours of Instruction, 838. Anesthetics 9, Minor surgery 36, 
General surgery 36, Regional surgery 54, Fractures and dislocations 36, 



326 The School of Medicine. 

Orthopedic surgery 18, Genito-urinary surgery 36, Surgical pathology 54, 
Operative surgery 144, Surgical diagnosis 36, Surgical conferences 18, 
Rectal surgery 9, Clinical surgery 144, Amphitheater clinics 144, Ear, 
nose, and throat 16, Eye 16, Ear, nose, throat, and eye clinics 32. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. 

Professor : Guffey. 
Associate Professor: Irland. 
Assistant Professor: Vanorden. 

Instruction in the principles of obstetrics and gynecology is given by 
means of lectures, recitations, and demonstrations. Clinical instruction 
is given in the dispensary and wards of the Bell Memorial hospital. 
Further practical instruction in obstetrics is obtained through the out- 
patient department. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. — Physiological Obstetrics. Two hours credit. Second semester, 
M. W., at 1.' Lectures and recitations. Required of second-year stu- 
dents. Irland. 

third year. 

2. — Pathological Obstetrics. Two hours credit. Fall term, W. S., at 
9. Lectures, recitations, and demonstrations. Required of third-year 
students. Guffey. 

3. — Diseases of the Female Genital Tract. Two hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, M. Th., at 9. Lectures, recitations, and demonstrations of 
illustrative pathological material. Required of third-year students. 

Guffey. 

4. — Operative Obstetrics. One hour credit. Second semester, F., at 
1. Recitations, demonstrations, and practice on the manikin by the 
student. Required of third-year students. Irland. 

5. — Obstetrical and Gynecological Pathology. Two hours credit. 
First semester, M., 2 to 5. A course devoted to the study of gross and 
microscopic pathology with special reference to specimens removed from 
patients operated upon before the class. Required of fourth-year stu- 
dents. Major, Guffey. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS. 

6. — Dispensary. — One hour credit. A minimum of eighteen hours is 
required. A course devoted chiefly to history taking, the technique of 
examination, and the treatment of ambulatory patients. Students as- 
signed in groups. Guffey, Irland, and Vanorden. 

7. — Practical Work in Obstetrics. The conduct of two births in a 
hospital and eight on the out-patient service is required before gradua- 
tion. Assigned work. Guffey, Irland, Vanorden. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

8. — Clinical Conference in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Two 
hours credit. Both semesters, Th. 3 to 5. An exhaustive consideration 
of all cases in the Bell Hospital. Also", reports and discussions of case 
histories and important abnormalities met with in the out-patient serv- 
ice. Required in fourth-year students. Guffey. 

9. — Clinics in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Two hours credit. Both 
semesters, F., 9 to 12. This course logically follows course 6, as the 
same patients are further examined, given treatment, or operated upon. 
Students present histories, assist with operations, and make full reports 
of pathological findings, operative technique, or treatment. Required 
of fourth-year students. Guffey. 

Total Hours of Instruction, 272. Gynecology: didactic 32, clinical 
77, laboratory 16, total 115. Obstetrics: didactic 86, clinical 77, labora- 
tory 16; total 179. Total didactic 118, clinimal 154, laboratory 32. 



The School of Medicine. 327 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 



FACULTY. 

Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

S. J. Crumbine, M. D., Dean, School of Medicine. 

M. T. Sudler, M. D., Associate Dean, School of Medicine. 

S. Milo Hixch, R. N., Superintendent of Bell Memorial Hospital, Supervisor of Nurses. 

William Kirk Trimble, M. D., Lecturer on Pathology. 

Waldo R. Oechli, M. D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Don Carlos Guffey, A. M., M. D., Instructor in Medicine and Obstetrics. 

Claude Yeager, Instructor in Materia Medica. 

This School was established in July, 1906, with the opening of the 
Bell Memorial Hospital. It is a division of the School of Medicine of 
the University of Kansas, and subject to the same governing bodies. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The present hospital building contains sixty-five beds. The hospital 
receives all classes of patients except those suffering from dangerous 
contagious diseases or mental troubles, and shows a great variety of 
work. Also, since it is a teaching hospital, the character of the work 
shown is more instructive than that shown ordinarily in private hos- 
pitals. 

The close proximity of the laboratory, library, and other equipment 
of the School of Medicine affords great advantage in the way of medical 
information and instruction. 

ADMISSION. 

Women of good character between the ages of twenty and thirty are 
eligible for admission. Those with a high-school education are given 
preference. Those who are accepted are accepted with the understand- 
ing that they must spend a probationary period of three months in the 
school, during which time they will receive board, laundry, and lodging, 
but no other compensation, and that they agree to remain in the school, 
unless dismissed, the full term of three years. 

The didactic instruction begins October 1 and ends June 1 of each 
year, but students are admitted at any time when there is a vacancy. 

Any young woman who wishes to enter the school must make formal 
application to the supervisor of nurses of the Bell Memorial Hospital, 
Rosedale. With this application should be sent letters showing what 
educational advantages she has enjoyed, testifying to her good moral 
character, and to her good health. These letters should preferably be 
from her instructor and her medical attendant. 

Advanced Standing. Candidates for advanced standing must satisfy 
the requirements for admission and also show that they have had the 
work already done by the class to which they wish admission. An offi- 
cial statement of character and ability from the training school giving 
the previous work will be required. There will be required of them, 
as of beginners, a probationary period, and they will be required to pass 
an examination on the work for which they seek credit. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The course is for three years. It is customary to grant a vacation of 
three weeks each year. 

The instruction consists of two parts — the practical and the theoreti- 
cal. The practical work consists of sixty hours' work each week. The 
theoretical instruction requires four hours of lectures or recitations each 



328 



The School of Medicine. 



week, together with the necessary laboratory work in dietitics, etc. This 
theoretical instruction includes the necessary work in anatomy, physi- 
ology, hygiene, medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, etc. 



HOURS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Juniors. 

Hygiene and nursing ethics 4 

Theory and demonstration — nursing 32 

Anatomy and physiology 32 

Materia medica 20 

Ward solutions 2 

Urinalysis 

Bacteriology 16 

Laboratory technic 6 

Obstetrics and Gynecology '..."..• 

Chemistry 10 

Pediatrics 

Surgery 

Bandaging 

Dietetics .* 40 

Nervous diseases 

Ear, nose, and throat 

Eye 



Intermediate. 



32 



162 



97 



Seniors. 
4 



5 

5 

15 

35 



PROMOTION. 

Students are advanced upon the obtaining of satisfactory grades in 
their practical work and upon their passing satisfactory examinations in 
their theoretical work. Reports on the practical work are made monthly 
and those on the theoretical work semiannually. 

GRADUATION. 

At the close of a successful course of three years the students are 
granted a diploma under the seal of the University of Kansas. Before 
they receive such a diploma they must make up lost time and demerits 
charged against them during the course. 

EXPENSES. 

Each nurse must furnish her own uniform, books and instruments.* 
To cover such professional expenses each member of the training school 
is allowed $7 a month. From this compensation is deducted, of course, 
the cost of material unnecessarily broken or lost. Since the board, 
lodging, and necessary laundry work are furnished free,, the pupil nurse 
secures her training at little or no expenditure of money. 



* These instruments consist of 1 hypodermic syringe (all glass), 1 pair bandage 
scissors, 1 pair of small scissors, 1 probe, 2 thumb forceps. 



SECTION IX. 

School of Education, 

(329) 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., President. 

Frederick J. Kelly, Ph. D., Dean and Professor of Education. 

Arvin Olin, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Arthur T. Walker, Ph. D., Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

William H. Johnson, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Elmer F. Engel, A. M., Professor of German. 

Elizabeth C. Sprague, Professor of Home Economics. 

William B. Downing, Professor of Public School Music. 

Raymond A. Schwegler, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Raymond A. Kent, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

Frederick R. Hamilton, Ph. B., Director University Extension Division. 

Hannah Oliver, A. M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Elise Neuen Schwander, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Ulysses G. Mitchell, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Hubert W. Nutt, A. M., Associate Professor of Education. 

Ralph E. Carter, A. M., Associate Professor of Education. 

George W. Stratton, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank E. Melvin, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of European History. 

William L. Eikenberry, B. S., Assistant Professor of the Teaching of 
Biological Sciences. 

May Gardner, A. B., Assistant Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

John R. Frazier, Assistant Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Lita Battey, A. M., Assistant Professor of the Teaching of English. 

Charles H. Watson, A. B., Assistant Professor of the Teaching of 
Physical Sciences. 

Hazel K. Allen, Ph. B., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Hazel H. Pratt, A. B., Instructor in Physical Education. 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

F. J. Kelly, Chairman. 
A. T. Walker. U. G. Mitchell. 

W H. Johnson. Elizabeth Sprague. 

R. A. Schwegler. H. W. Nutt. 

F. E. Melvin. 

(331) 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, 



RELATION WITH THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
AND SCIENCES. 

The School of Education works in intimate relationship with the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The academic courses which enter 
into the preparation of teachers and school administrators are offered by 
the College, while the professional courses in education are offered by the 
School of Education. 

Two classes of students enroll in the School of Education : First, those 
who are candidates for the degree of bachelor of science in education, 
granted by the School of Education ; and second, those who are candidates 
for the University teacher's diploma, granted by the School of Education, 
and for the degree of bachelor of arts, granted by the College. Students 
of the first class enroll in the School of Education for all of their work 
at the beginning of the Junior year at the University. Students of the 
second class enroll in the College during the entire undergraduate period 
of their attendance at the University and enroll in the School of Educa- 
tion only for their courses in education. Such students must adjust their 
College courses, however, so as to meet the requirements of the Uni- 
versity teachers' diploma. 

RELATION WITH THE KANSAS STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Students with advanced standing from any of the Kansas State 
Normal Schools entering the School of Education as candidates for the 
degree of bachelor of science in education will be given credit, hour for 
hour, for courses in the Normal Schools approved by the joint committee 
of the Normal Schools and the University. What these courses are 
may be learned by inquiry either from the Normal School concerned or 
from the University. Such students will, of course, complete the specific 
requirements for the degree. 

Graduates of the Kansas State Normal Schools whose undergraduate 
work has been made up of approved courses are admitted without de- 
ficiency to the Graduate School of the University as candidates for the 
degree of master of science in education. 

DEGREE IN EDUCATION. 

The degree of bachelor of science in education may be granted to 
students who complete either of the two optional courses prescribed 
below, provided in the record of scholarship in all the work offered for 
the degree there are at least as many hours rated B or above as there 
are hours rated C or below. In this calculation 1 hour rated A is re- 
garded as equivalent to 2 hours rated B, and 1 hour rated D is regarded 
as equivalent to 2 hours rated C. Also, 1 hour rated I under the former 
system of grading is to be counted as Is hours of B, and 1 hour rated 
as III under the former system of grading is to be counted as \\ hours 
of C. 

(333) 



334 



School of Education. 



Courses in the College and the School of Education Required for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education. 

OPTION I.— FOR SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS AND PRINCIPALS. 



English 

Public Speaking 

Foreign Language 

Mathematics 

Physical Science 

Biological Science 

History and Political Science . 



Economics . 



Sociology . 



Philosophy and Psychology 
Education 



Minor . . . 
Electives . 



Student 
credit 
hours. 



20 



Reduction 
by high 
school 
work.* 



15 



Specific requirements. 



Extempore Speaking. 



From 2 different sciences. 

From 2 different sciences. 

American Government, 5 hours; and 
Elementary Law, 3 hours; or 
Municipal Government, 3 hours. 

Elements of Economics, 5 hours; and 
Public Finance, 3 hours; or 
Elements of Accounting, 3 houis. 

Elements of Sociology, 3 hours; and from 

the following, 4 hours: 
Social Surveys, 2 hours; 
Rural Sociology, 2 hours; 
Municipal Sociology, 2 hours; 
Social Pathology, 2 hours. 

General Psychology, o hours. 

History of Education, 3 hours. 

Educational Psychology, or Psycholog y 
of High School Subjects, 3 hours. 

Abnormal Child, 3 hours. 

Technique of Teaching, 2 hours. 

Supervision of Instruction, or City 
School Administration, 2 hours. 

Educational Organization and Adminis- 
tration or High-school Administra- 
tion, 3 hours. 

Educational Measurements, 2 hours. 

School Hygiene, 3 hours. 

Elective from all education groups, 9 
houisf. 



To bring total of College and School of 
Education hours to 120. 



*At rate of 5 hours per high-school unit. 

fA teachers' course and senior teaching are required of thqse without teaching experience, 
**See note following Option II. 



Teachers' Diploma. 



335 



Courses in the College and the School of Education Required for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education. 

OPTION II.— FOR TEACHERS. 



English 

Public Speaking 

Foreign Language 

Mathematics 

Physical Science 

Biological Science 

History and Political Science 

Economics 

Sociology 

Philosophy and Psychology . 

Drawing 

Education 



Major. 
Minor. 



Electives . 



Student 
credit 
hours. 



20 

2 

20 

10 

10 

10 

10 

5 

5 

5 

3 

30 



Reduction 
by high- 
school 
work.* 



15 



Specific requirements. 



Extempore Speaking. 



From 2 different sciences. 
From 2 different sciences. 



General Psychology, 3 hours. 

Free-hand Drawing. 

History of Education, 3 hours. 
Educational Psychology, or Psychology 

of High School Subjects, 3 hours. 
Technique of Teaching, 2 hours. 
Adolescence, 3 hours. 
High School Administration, 3 hours. 
Social Education, 2 hours. 
Teachers' Course and Senior Teaching, 

5 hours. 
Elective from all education groups, 9 

hours. 



To bring total of College and School of 
Education hours to 120. 



*At rate of 5 hours per high-school unit. 

fThe minor in Option I and the major in Option II must be chosen from the following de- 
partments: English and Comparative Liteiature; Ancient Languages and Literatures; German 
Language and Literature; Hispanic Languages and Literatures^ Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures; Mathematics; Chemistry; Physies and Astronomy; Botany; Zoology; Physiology; History 
and Political Science; Home Economics. 

JThe minor in Option II may be chosen from the above departments — except that the major 
and the minor must not be in the same department — or fiom the following departments: Journal- 
ism; Public Speaking; Entomology; Bacteriology; Anatomy; Geology and Mineralogy; Economics 
and Commerce; Sociology; Philosophy and Psychology; Physical Education; Design; Music. 

UNIVERSITY TEACHERS' DIPLOMA. . 

The University teachers' diploma is accepted by the State Board of 
Education and legally qualifies the candidate for the state teachers' certi- 
ficate. Regular teachers in all four-year high schools in Kansas must 
have the state certificate, which is granted without examination only to 
persons completing an approved four-year college course: 

On recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Education, the 
University teachers' diploma may be granted to graduates of the College, 
and to those receiving degrees from the Graduate School, on the following 
conditions: 

1. Candidates for the University teachers' diploma are required to offer 
as part of their work: 



336 School of Education. 

(a) Elements of Sociology, 3 hours if taken in the Sophomore year, or 2 

hours if taken in the Junior or Senior year. 

(b) Elements of Economics, 5 hours if taken in the Freshman or Sopho- 

more year, or 3 hours if taken in the Junior or Senior year. 

(c) Extempore Speaking, 2 hours. 

(d) Free-hand Drawing, 3 hours (not required if drawing is included 

among the student's entrance units). 

(e) General Psychology, 3 hours; General Psychology Laboratory, 2 

hours. 

(/) Education as follows: History of Education, 3 hours; Educational 
Psychology or Educational Theory, 3 hours; Educational Adminis- 
tration, 3 hours; one teachers' course; Senior Teaching, 2 hours 
or 4 hours, according to the facilities for teaching afforded by the 
training school ; additional courses from the three education groups 
first listed above to make a total of fifteen hours, exclusive of 
senior teaching. 

(g) A minor. In addition to the College major, a minor of 20 hours in a 
department approved by the head of the major department. The 
minor must be outside the major department, but may or may not 
be in the same group as the major. If in the same group, courses 
taken as part of the major may also be counted toward the minor. 

2. In the record of scholorship in all the work offered for the teachers' 
diploma (120 hours) there must be at least as many hours rated B or 
above as there are hours rated C or below. In this calculation 1 hour 
rated A is regarded as equivalent to 2 hours rated B, and 1 hour rated 
D is regarded as equivalent to 2 hours rated C. Also, 1 hour rated I 
under the former system of grading is to be counted as l 1 /^ hours of B, 
and 1 hour rated as III under the former system of grading is to be 
counted as l 1 /^ hours of C. 

(1) On petition to the Faculty of the School of Education, teachers who have taught 
successfully in high school may be excused from the course in senior teaching. 

(2) Senior teaching and 15 additional hours in education count for credit in the 
College toward the degree of A. B. or of B. S. 

(3) Three hours in educational psychology or psychology of high-school subjects and 
three hours in history of education should be taken before the other required work in 
education. 

STATE TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES. 

Those not desiring to complete the requirements for the degree of B. S. 
in Education or the University Teachers' Diploma may become candi- 
dates for the following state teachers' certificates : 

(1) Three-year certificate renewable for life, valid in all schools of 
the state, including four-year high schools. The requirements for this 
certificate are: 

(a) College graduation. 

(b) Scholarship requirments as stated for the University teachers 

diploma. 

(c) Education as follows: 

1. General Psychology. 

2. Educational Psychology. 

3. Educational Administration. 

4. Other educational courses to make with 1, 2, and 3, a total 
of 18 semester hours, exclusive of senior teaching. 

(2) Three-year certificate renewable for three-year periods, valid in 
elementary schools, junior high schools, and two-year high schools. The 
requirements for this certificate are : 

(a) Sixty semester hours of college credit. 

(b) As part of the sixty hours, the following courses in education: 

1. General Psychology. 

2. Methods of Teaching. 

3. Elementary Education. 

(3) Special certificates in Music and in Drawing. For requirements 
consult the Dean of the School of Fine Arts. 



Bureau of Educational Service. 337 

admission. 

For admission to the School of Education (except for courses 1 and 2, 
which are open to Sophomores), of candidates for the degree of bachelor 
of science in education or of candidates for the University teach- 
ers' diploma, the completion of an approved four-year high-school course 
and at least sixty hours credit of college work in institutions approved 
by the University, are required. This college work must include General 
Psychology, 3 hours, and should include Elements of Economics, 5 hours, 
and Elements of Sociology, 3 hours. 

Applicants for admission to the courses in education who are deficient 
in a small portion of these requirements may be admitted conditionally 
at the discretion of the Dean. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

Credit for work of collegiate or professional standing is granted only 
on recommendation of the Advanced Standing Committee. 

For regulation governing the granting of such credit see "Admission 
to Advanced Standing," Section I, page 52. 

ADVISERS. 

Every student in the School of Education selects the courses for which 
he enrolls each semester, with the advice and approval of some member 
of the Faculty, who is called an adviser. 

Students who are candidates for or who expect to become candidates 
for the degree of bachelor of science in education should observe the fol- 
lowing suggestions concerning advisers. 

Those planning to become superintendents or principles should be ad- 
vised concerning their courses by Mr. Johnson or Mr. Kent. 

Those planning to become teachers of courses in education in high 
school, normal school or college should be advised by Mr. Olin, Mr. Car- 
ter, or Mr. Nutt. 

Those planning to become teachers of special classes for subnormal 
children should be advised by Mr. Schwegler. 

Those planning to become teachers of the regular academic subjects 
in high school, normal school, or college should be advised by the repre- 
sentative of the student's major department who conducts the teachers' 
course in that department. 

Students who are candidates for or who expect to become candidates 
for the University teachers' diploma should be advised by the head of the 
student's major department or by some one in the department designated 
by the head. 

BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICE. 

One of the chief functions of a School of Education in a State Uni- 
versity is to render such service as it can in helping the school superin- 
tendents and teachers of the state to solve the practical problems which 
arise in their work. In order to systematize the efforts of the School 
of Education along this line the Bureau of Educational Service is or- 
ganized. The bureau invites the school people to address it concerning 
their educational problems of whatever nature. The bureau also offers to 
lend its aid in carrying on such investigations as those in charge of the 
public schools wish, to conduct. Furthermore, it provides a medium 
through which the results of educational investigations made anywhere 
in the state are made most widely available to the rest of the state. 



22— K. U.— 5419. 



338 School of Education. 

schoolmen's conference at the university. 

The School of Education has in charge the Annual High-school Con- 
ference, which meets in March of each year. 

RECOMMENDATION OF TEACHERS. 

The University endeavors to assist those of its graduates who desire 
to teach in securing positions, and at the same time to be of service to 
high schools, academies, and colleges which may be in need of competent 
superintendents, principals, or instructors. To this end a representative 
committee of the Faculty of the School of Education preserves a complete 
list and record of graduates who are engaged in teaching or have fitted 
themselves especially for such work. The University authorities are thus 
prepared at any time to recommend persons who are well qualified for 
educational positions. In so doing great care is exercised, the special 
qualifications of various teachers for the particular position in hand being 
in every case fully considered. 

Records are kept of every detail of the student's qualifications for 
teaching, including the estimate of all college professors of the scholar- 
ship, personality, strength of character, and general adaptability of the 
candidate, as well as critical estimates of his teaching ability, indicated 
by his practice teaching in Oread Training School. 

The committee urges members of school boards and school adminis- 
trators to come to Lawrence in person when possible, so that personal 
conferences with both University instructors and the candidates for 
teaching may insure mutual satisfaction and be a guarantee of effective 
service. 

The committee has adopted the policy, in its official recommendations, 
of attaching special importance to graduate study in the professional 
preparation of teachers. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The School has a growing educational museum of considerable value, 
including ancient and modern textbooks, former and present-day school 
appliances and equipments, maps and charts, a good deal of which is 
frequently in use in the Training School. There are over five thousand 
volumes in the University library classified under the title "Education." 
This equipment is being greatly augmented through the acquisition of 
the files of leading French and German educational periodicals and 
classical treatises. The School of Education makes constant use of the 
stereopticon and numerous lantern slides, and has a rapidly growing 
collection of stereographs with stereoscopes for illustrating their proper 
use in the schools. A special room for this work, fitted up as a dark 
room, is reserved for use by members of the Faculty of Education. 
Forty-five weekly or monthly educational periodicals come to the library, 
There are complete files of the leading American periodicals and the files 
of the leading English, French, and German periodicals are being com- 
pleted. In addition to the usual library facilities, a commodious seminary 
room and alcove in the reading room of the library are reserved for the 
use of the several departments within the School of Education. The sem- 
inary room is equipped with separate card index system and is under the 
direction of a trained library attendant. 

OREAD TRAINING SCHOOL. 

As a laboratory for the science of education there is maintained as a 
part of the School of Education a typical high school under the name 
Oread Training School. It is housed in a separate building, which was 
erected in 1915. The school is designed to exemplify for prospective 
teachers, and to visiting teachers, principals, and superintendents, the 



Graduate Policy of the School. 339 

equipment, organization, curriculum, and methods of instruction advo- 
cated by the School of Education. 

University students with entrance deficiencies may make these up in 
the school. Any student who has completed the eighth grade in the public 
schools, or its equivalent, is eligible to admission. Those who have cred- 
its for high-school work done elsewhere will be admitted to those ad- 
vanced courses for which their previous work qualifies them. 

GRADUATE POLICY OF SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 

The progressive tendency in many states is to encourage teachers and 
school administrators to continue in some university advanced study and 
research in education. The most vital discoveries in this field must 
finally be made by those on the ground — teachers in active service. This 
work creates a demand for those who have had training in the methods 
of investigation and in the interpretation of the data collected. 

Upon the basis of an agreement between the University and the Kan- 
sas State Normal Schools, graduates of the Kansas State Normal Schools 
may enter the Graduate School unconditionally (a few courses excepted) 
as candidates for the degree of master of science in education. 

The School of Education provides instruction suited to the needs of 
graduate students in educational psychology, history and philosophy of 
education, educational administration, and in the principles of teaching 
in the various subjects. In accordance with the regulations of the Gradu- 
ate School, students may pursue, as a major or minor, advanced work in 
any of these subjects. The master's degree usually requires one year of 
graduate work; the doctor's degree, three years. Work leading to these 
higher degrees, with education as a major, is planned in such a way as 
to afford preparation for responsible positions, particularly those in- 
volving administrative and supervisory duties and teaching of education 
in colleges and normal schools. Graduate work, undertaken with the 
major in some academic subject and the minor in education, is usually 
planned in such a way as to afford desirable equipment for the teaching of 
special branches. 

All work for the higher degrees with education as a major should be 
planned carefully from the beginning, in consultation with the Dean of 
the School of Education. Graduate work may be done during any term, 
including the Summer Session. 



340 School of Education. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



SOPHOMORE COURSES. 

To meet the demands of the School of Fine Arts, in which certain 
teacher's certificate requirements are fulfilled in two years of work above 
high school, and to enable sophomore students in the College, who find it 
necessary to leave college and begin teaching, to meet the requirements 
of the State Board of Education for a three-year certificate, courses 1 
and 2 ar offered by the School of Education. The certificate thus se- 
cured is valid only in elementary schools, junior high schools, and two- 
year high schools, except that those completing the special two-year 
course in some special subject receive a certificate valid for teaching that 
subject in any of the high schools of the state. These courses will not 
be counted for credits toward the University teachers' diploma unless 
the student has taught at least one year on the certificate which the 
courses were used to secure. 

1. — Methods of Teaching. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
10:30. This course deals with those fundamental principles of method 
that are most helpful to teachers in the organization and presentation of 
subject matter. The illustrative materials are taken from a wide range 
of subjects, but the emphasis is upon the problems that pertain par- 
ticularly to the elementary schools. Nutt. 

2. — Elementary Education. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
11:30. The purpose of the course is to give the prospective teacher in 
elementary schools a general appreciation of the aim, scope, and setting 
of elementary education and the more necessary information on the in- 
ternal organization of the elementary school. Kelly. 

JUNIOR, SENIOR, AND GRADUATE COURSES. 

The following courses are so arranged as to enable students to plan 
for their advanced work for their Junior year, with reference to three 
fairly distinct aspects of education: history of education, educational 
theory and educational administration. One course in history of educa- 
tion (50 or 51) and one course in educational psychology (64), or 
psychology of high-school subjects (75) should precede all other courses 
in the School of Education. Advanced credit from other universities or 
colleges, or from normal schools, will be granted as individual cases may 
warrant. Such students should consult the Dean of he School before 
enrolling. 

HISTORY OF EDUCATION. 

50. — History op Ancient and Mediaeval Education. Three hours 
credit. First semester, 8:30, 3:30. This course is a study of educa- 
tional principles and practice, systems, and educational theorists among 
ancient and mediaeval people. It includes the important features of 
Oriental, Greek, Roman, early Christian, and Saracenic education, the 
renaissance of learning under Charlemagne, the rise of universities, and 
the early phases of the Renaissance movement. Olin. 

51. — History of Modern Education. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, 2:30; second semester, 8:30, 3:30. Doctrines and systems de- 
veloping from the educational reforms and reformers of the seventeenth 
century, including Bacon, Comenius, and other innovators. Decline and 
restatement of humanism in the eighteenth century, the strengthening of 



Description of Courses. 341 

realism, and the institutional development growing out of these changes. 
The educational evolution of the nineteenth century in Germany, France, 
England, and America under such leaders as Pestalozzi, Guizot, Arnold, 
Spencer, and Mann. Olin. 

59. — Educational Classics I. Two hours credit. First semester, 
10:30. A critical and historical study of selected dialogues of Plato, and 
of the educational writings of Locke. An attempt will be made to trace 
the relation between the opinions of these two writers' and the educa- 
tional theory and practice of the age in which each lived. Olin. 

60. — Educational Classics II. Two hours credit. First semester, 
10:30. An intensive study, in their historical setting, of the educational 
writings of Rousseau and Spencer. , Olin. 

63. — Education in America. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
9:30. A study of the origin and development of educational ideas, insti- 
tutions, and systems in the colonial period; the evolution of the academy, 
high school, and professional school; the education of girls and women; 
manual and vocational instruction; and the work of leading educators 
and theorists: Mann, Willard, Lyon, Howe, Gallaudet, Barnard, Elliot, 
Harris. Olin. 

102. — Seminar. Educational systems of Herbart and Froebel. Two 
hours credit. First semester, by appointment. Olin. 

103. — Seminar. Origin and early development of universities. Two 
hours credit. Second semester, by appointment. Olin. 

EDUCATIONAL THEORY. 

54. — Educational Clinic. Three hours credit. Second semester, by 
appointment. By the kindly cooperation of neighboring schoolmen it has 
been possible to provide for mature students an opportunity for the direct 
study of typical cases of exceptional mental development. Tests for 
various mental functions will be demonstrated, and the Binet-Simon, 
Yerkes-Bridges, and other scales of tests will be used to determine psychic 
normality. Schwegler. 

55. — Mental Measurement of Individual School Children. Three 
hours credit. First semester, 11.30. A study of the theory and practice 
of mental measurement. The course deals especially with the problems 
of mental deficiency, exceptional endowment, and vocational guidance. 

Schwegler. 

64. — Educational Psychology. Three hours credit. Second semester, 
1:30. Not open to students who have taken course 75. The processes 
usually treated in general psychology will be considered in their relation 
to the technique and economy of learning. Habit formation and thought 
will receive especial attention in their connection with the study of school 
subjects. Lectures, experiments, reading, and discussion. Carter. 

67. — Advanced Educational Psychology. Two hours credit. First 
semester, 9:30. A more intensive treatment and more extended appli- 
cation of some of the topics treated in courses 64 and 75. There is 
opportunity to formulate and use means of revealing the less obvious of 
the more significant faults of studying in the different high-school 
subjects. Carter. 

68. — The Principles of Education. Three hours credit. Second 
semester, 9:30. An analysis of educational norms in theory and practice 
in the light of the facts of biology, psychology, and sociology. Lectures, 
library studies, written reports. Schwegler. 

69. — Technique of Teaching. Two hours credit. First semester, 
3:30. A careful study of the fundamental principles of classroom in- 
struction will be made. The Training School will offer abundant oppor- 
tunities for demonstrative and illustrative material. The course is de- 



342 School of Education. 

signed to supplement the work of teachers' courses and to correlate as 
much as possible with practice teaching. Nutt. 

71. — The Abnormal Child. — Three hours credit. First semester, 
9:30. The growth and development of children are studied with special 
reference to the nature and causes of arrest as found in backward, de- 
fective, and degenerate children. This course is intended for mature stu- 
dents who are preparing themselves for executive positions in town and 
city schools and for students desiring to prepare for supervisory work. 
Lectures and visits to various institutions maintained by the state for 
defective and delinquent children. Schwegler. 

75. — Psychology of High-school Subjects. Three hours credit. 
Both semesters. First semester, 9:30, 1:30; second semester, 9:30, 2:30. 
(May be taken instead of course 64 as the state and school requirement 
in educational psychology, but not open to students who have had course 
64.) This course differs from course 64 chiefly in the organization of 
material. Instead of making the different mental processes the basis of 
organization for the discussion of learning in the schools, the high-school 
subjects are treated separately with reference to the mental processes 
and psychological principles involved. Carter. 

78. — Adolescence. Three hours credit. Both semesters, 10:30. A 
detailed study of the physical, social, and psychological aspects of ado- 
lescence. The course will lay special stress on the problems of physical 
and mental hygiene, as they appear in the physical, intellectual, social, 
and religious development of the adolescent. Schwegler. 

79. — Moral Education. Two hours credit. Second semester, 7 to 9 
p. m., Wednesday. A critical study of the underlying psychological 
forces, both conscious and unconscious, which govern the development of 
habits of thought and action, followed by a review of prevailing systems 
of moral education. Schwegler. 

100. — Seminar in Educational Psychology. Two hours credit. 
Both semesters, hours by appointment. Students may spend their time 
in an intensive study of recent investigations in an educational problem 
involving psychological principles and methods, or in an actual investi- 
gation of such a problem. Carter. 

101. — Seminar in Mental Defects. Two hours credit. Both semes- 
ters, by appointment. An opportunity for mature students to make a 
special study of certain forms of irregular mental life frequently met in 
grade and high-school work. Schwegler. 

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION. 

52. — Educational Measurements. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, 11:30. This course involves a consideration of the standards and 
scales for the measurement of educational attainment, together with the 
technique of applying these to educational products. Kelly. 

53. — Social Education. Two hours credit. Second semester, 9:30. 
The course attempts to show that sociology is coordinate with psychology 
as a basis for education. It applies social principles and data to school 
practices just as educational psychology applies psychological principles 
and data. Carter. 

56. — Vocational Education and Guidance. Three hours credit. First 
semester, 2:30. The development of vocational education in Europe and 
America; its organization and administration; the relation of the school 
system to the various industries of the community ; the relation of indus- 
trial education to vocational guidance ; the consideration of the various 
theories for the adjustment of educational means to vocational aptitudes. 

Johnson. 

57. School Hygiene. Three hours credit. Second semester, 3:30. 

The work of this course will be considered under three principal divi- 



Description of Courses. 343 

sions: (1) Schoolroom sanitation; (2) Personal hygiene of school chil- 
dren; (3) Mental hygiene of school children. Nutt. 

61. — High-school Administration. Three hours credit. Both semes- 
ters. First semester, 8:30; second semester, 8:30, 11:30. The purpose 
of this course is to present the practical problems in the administration 
of the high school. The relationship between school and community and 
plans for greater cooperation between the school and the home will be 
discussed. Each member of the class will be expected to make a rather 
detailed study of some high-school problem in which he is especially in- 
terested. Johnson. 

66. — Educational Statistics. Three hours credit. First semester, 
11:30. A study of statistical method as applied to educational problems. 
This course dovetails with seminar courses in educational administration, 
educational psychology, secondary education, and mental defects, in 
which problems requiring statistical treatment are studied. Kelly. 

70. — School Surveys. Three hours credit. First semester, 8:30. A 
study of kinds, purposes, methods and results of school surveys. This 
includes a study of selected parts of standard surveys and a considera- 
tion of types of practical survey work possible by regular administrators 
in ordinary school systems. Open only to experienced public-school ad- 
ministrators. Kent. 

72. — Supervision of Instruction. Two hours credit. First semester, 
9:30. Principles and standards of supervision with concrete application 
of same to actual work. Particular attention is given to standard 
methods of measuring teaching and the teaching product. Open only to 
those having had teaching experience. Kent. 

73. — City School Administration. Two hours credit. Second semes- 
ter, 8:30. An intensive study of some of the more common and important 
problems met with in administering a city school system. The problems 
taken up are studied in the light of scientific principles of educational 
administration. Kent. 

74. — Educational Organziation and Administration. Three hours 
credit. Second semester, 2:30. Among the topics discussed are: relation 
of the national government to education in the states and insular pos- 
sessions ; state administrative organizations ; local units of control ; school 
costs and support; material equipment; recent legislation; administrative 
and supervisory officers; classification and promotion of pupils; period 
of attendance ; physical education and health. Kent. 

77. — Practical Problems of Public-school Education. Credit to be 
arranged. Saturday morning at 10, both semesters. The work offered 
in this course is planned with special reference to the needs of actual 
teachers and administrators living in the vicinity of Lawrence. Vital 
problems in school work will be studied and interpreted in the light of 
modern scientific principles and methods of investigation. The work and 
the instructors will be arranged when the class first meets, September 27. 

The amount of credit given will depend upon the work of the individual 
student. 

This course is designed for those teachers and school supervisors who, 
although in actual service, desire to continue their professional develop- 
ment. 

104. — Seminar in Educational Administration. Two hours credit. 
Both semesters, by appointment. Kelly. 

SPECIAL METHODS AND SENIOR TEACHING. 

The prerequisites for all teachers' courses are not less than twenty 
nor more than twenty-five hours in the subject in which the teachers' 
course is given or in closely allied subjects, three hours in history of 
education, and three hours in educational psychology. All teachers' 
courses, not including credits for practice, shall be not less than two nor 



344 School of Education. 

more than four hours in length for one semester, and shall be open to 
students of Senior and Graduate standing. By permission of. the Dean 
a portion of the work described above as prerequisite may be taken at 
the same time with the teachers' course, and special mature students 
under certain conditions, with the approval of the Dean, may take other 
education courses in lieu of a teacher's course. 

The items enumerated below are suggestive of the kinds of topics with 
which the following teachers' courses in special branches are concerned: 

1. A simple statement of the broader aspects of the distinctive field of 
education, indicating the special adjustment of the moral, aesthetic, social, 
and practical disciplines to be reasonably expected from a study of the 
subject. 

2. A brief sketch of the actual history of the subject in the school 
curriculum, showing the gradual change and improvements in the text- 
book presentations of the subject, and the gradual improvements in other 
apparatus than textbooks adopted for use in teaching it. 

3. The gradual change in the conception of its educational value and 
the degree and nature of correlation with other subjects. 

4. The growing refinement of methods for presenting the subject. 

5. The grade preparation to be presupposed at present, its present 
status, as seen from a comparison of typical high-school curriculums, to- 
gether with the social, psychological, and practical obstacles to its attain- 
ing its ideal educational aim. 

6. The necessary, and also the more ideal, preparation called for in 
the teacher, academic and professional. 

7. References to books and special monographs dealing with the topics 
of the course, and a suggested list of books desirable for reference for 
high-school libraries. 

In addition to the instruction in the following specialized courses in 
the theory of teaching, a continuous period of not less than nine weeks 
and preferably eighteen weeks of supervised teaching should be arranged 
for by students electing such courses. Exceptional facilities are of- 
fered for this teaching in the Oread Training School. 

81. — Teachers' Course in Biological Sciences. Three hours credit. 
Both semesters, 11. The existing organization of high-school science 
courses and proposed reorganizations; the place and function of biologi- 
cal science in the high school; the conditions under which biology courses 
are usually given, and the organization of such courses; the methods, 
devices, books, and apparatus to accomplish the aims of biology teaching, 
and the arrangement and equipment of laboratories and classrooms. Lec- 
tures, classroom observation, reading demonstrations. It is expected 
that the student will register for 81 and 81a in the same semester, in 
order that theory and practice may be closely correlated. Eikenberry. 

8 lot. — Senior Teaching in Biological Sciences. Both semesters, 
hours to be arranged. Eikenberry. 

99. — Teachers' Course in Chemistry. Two hours credit. Second 
semester, by appointment. Pedagogics and technique of instruction in 
chemistry in the high school. Stratton. 

99a. — Senior Teaching in Chemistry. Both semesters, hours to be 
arranged. Stratton 

95 — Teachers' Course in Drawing and Design. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite, courses 54, 51 and 1 in drawing Frazier 

95a. — Senior Teaching in Drawing and Design.' Second semester, 
hours to be arranged. Frazier. 

86.— Teachers' Course in English. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, 2. The principles of teaching English composition, language, 
and literature ; lectures, reference reading, conferences, visiting of classes 
and schools, reports, and final thesis. Battey. 

The prerequisite in English for course 86 are courses 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 



Description of Courses. 345 

13, 68, 78, and in advanced English composition five hours of any courses 
from 50 to 57 at option. 

86a. — Senior Teaching in English. Both semesters, hours to be ar- 
ranged. Battey. 

88. — Teachers' Course in French. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, by appointment. Systematic review of grammatical principles from 
the point of view of the requirements of elementary instruction. Out- 
lines of historical grammar. Study of the methods of teaching lan- 
guages. Open only to students who give evidence of fitness for the 
work. Neuen Schwander. 

88a. — Senior Teaching in French. Both semesters, by appointment. 

Neuen Schwander. 

85.— Teachers' Course in German. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester, 9. Advanced grammar, with theory of language teaching. In- 
tended especially for those who desire to fit themselves for teaching Ger- 
man in high schools. Engel. 

85a. — Senior Teaching in German. Both semesters, hours to be ar- 
ranged. Engel. 

91. — Teachers' Course in History. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter, 1, Tues. and Thurs., third hour by appointment. A study in 
adapting historical and current social literature to the service of high- 
school students. High-school courses of study, methods of teaching, text- 
books, reference books, and apparatus will be considered. Melvin. 

91a. — Senior Teaching in History. Both semesters, hours to be 
Arranged. Melvin. 

83. — Teachers' Course in Home Economics. Three hours credit. 
First semester, 9. The history of the home economics movement, show- 
ing the reason for the diverse standards and aims to be found in the 
work in different schools. Special emphasis will be put on the high- 
school problem; the ground that should be covered and methods of pres- 
entation ; the planning of equipment, of courses, and of typical lessons. 

Sprague. 

83a. — Senior Teaching in Home Economics. Both semesters, hours 
to be arranged. Allen. 

87. — Teachers' Course in Latin. Three hours credit. First semester, 
2. The work consists of discussion of the best literature on the aims 
and methods of teaching Latin, a critical examination of some text- 
books used in secondary Latin teaching and a study of some grammati- 
cal principles. Walker. 

Both the major and minor in Latin must include college courses 
5, 7, 9, and 13. The major must include also courses 10, 50, and either 
8 or 51. 

87a. — Senior Teaching in Latin. Both semesters, hours to be ar- 
ranged: Oliver. 

89. — Teachers' Course in Mathematics. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester, 11. It deals with the history, teaching, and mutual re- 
lations of the mathematical subjects usually taught in the public schools 
from the beginning of the seventh grade to the end of the high-school 
course. This course consists of (1) history of the teaching of mathe- 
matics, reading, and lectures; (2) a comparative study of the mathe- 
matical curricula of the schools of this country and of Europe; (3) dis- 
cussions on the best methods of presenting the topics. Open to Seniors 
and graduates who have completed courses 62 and 7 in mathematics. 

Mitchell. 

89a. — Senior Teaching in Mathematics. Both semesters, hours to 
be arranged. Mitchell. 

94. — Teachers' Course in Music. Downing. 



346 School of Education. 

94a. — Senior Teaching in Music. Downing. 

For public-school music course, see bulletin of the School of Fine Arts. 

84. — Teachers' Course in Normal Training. Two and one-half 
hours credit. First semester, first half, daily, 3. This course will pre- 
sent outlines for psychology and methods courses as they are offered 
in high schools, discuss textbooks, and cover in detail the problems of 
teaching that are involved in such courses. Nutt. 

84a. — Senior Teaching in Normal Training. Both semesters, hours 
to be arranged. Nutt. 

97. — Teachers' Course in Physical Education. Two hours credit. 
First semester, 9. Laboratory hours by appointment. A study of the 
principles of play, the classification of games, showing the grade for 
which each is adapted; and an analysis of the different games, showing 
the principles involved, and the attributes developed. The methods used 
in coaching and officiating, the locating, equipping, and organizing of 
playgrounds. Pratt. 

97a. — Senior Teaching in Physical Education. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. An analysis of gymnastic movements, showing their adaptation 
to the different grades ; and methods of combining these into drills, devis- 
ing drills for special occasions and to suit varying conditions ; organizing 
and conducting classes; and observation of methods by visitation and 
practice teaching with selected classes. Pratt. 

80. — Teachers' Course in Physical Sciences. Three hours credit. 
Second semester, by appointment. A study of the appropriate subject 
matter in the various physical sciences taught in the high school, and the 
correct methods of using this subject matter in demonstration, recitation, 
and laboratory. Watson. 

80a. — Senior Teaching in Physical Sciences. Both semesters, 
hours to be arranged. Watson. 

96a. — Senior Teaching in Social Sciences. Both semesters, hours 
to be arranged. Nutt. 

90. — Teachers' Course in Spanish. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester, by appointment. Theories and methods of modern language 
teaching; advanced grammar, bibliographies for the teacher of Spanish; 
examination of textbooks. Gardner. 

90a. — Senior Teaching in Spanish. Both semesters, hours to be ar- 
ranged. Gardner. 



SECTION X. 

The Summer Session, 

(347) 



FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Chancellor of the University and President of the Facul- 
ties. 

Frederick James Kelly, Director of the Summer Session, and Professor 
of Education. 



Instructors from Other Institutions. 

John R. Clark, A. M., Professor of Education, Chicago Normal College. 

Kate Daum, A. M., Instructor in Home Economics, University of Indiana. 

Halford L. Hoskins, A. B., Assistant Professor of European History, 
Trinity College, North Carolina. 

Oskar Augustus Johannsen, Ph. D., Professor of Entomology, Cornell 
University. 

Guy Mitchell Wilson, Ph. D., Professor of Agricultural Education, 
Iowa State College. 

William B. Wilson, M. S., Professor of Biological Sciences, Ottawa Uni- 
versity. 



Instructors from the University of Kansas. 

James Woods Green, Professor of Law. 

Charles Graham Dunlap, Professor of English Literature. 

Carl Adolph Preyer, Professor of Piano, Counterpoint, Canon, and 
Fugue. 

Olin Templin, Professor of Philosophy. 

Edwin Mortimer Hopkins, Professor of Rhetoric and English Language. 

Frank Heywood Hodder, Professor of American History. 

Arthur Tappan Walker, Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

William Chase Stevens, Professor of Botany. 

Arvin Solomon Olin, Professor of Education. 

Eugenie Galloo, Professor of Romance Languages and Literature. 

William Livesey Burdick, Professor of Law. 

William Hamilton Johnson, Professor of Education. 

Henry Wilbur Humble, Professor of Law. 

Frank Burnett Dains, Professor of Chemistry. 

Elmer Franklin Engel, Professor of German. 

William Oliver Hamilton, Professor of Physical Education and Gen- 
eral Manager of Athletics. 

Arthur MacMurray, Professor of Public Speaking. 

William Bell Downing, Professor of Voice. 

Raphael Dorman O'Leary, Professor of English. 

Raymond Alfred Schwegler, Professor of Education. 

Arthur Jerome Boynton, Professor of Economics. 

Charles Hamilton Ashton, Professor of Mathematics. 

(349) 



350 The Summer Session. 

Raymond A. Kent, Professor of Education. 

Leon Nelson Flint, Professor of Journalism. 

George Ellett Coghill, Professor of Anatomy. 

Ole Olufson Stoland, Professor of Physiology. 

Walter Samuel Hunter, Professor of Psychology. 

William Mathews Hekking, Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Prank Estes Kendrie, Professor of Violin. 

Carl Ferdinand Nelson, Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 

Arthur Leslie Owen, Professor of Hispanic Languages and Literature. 

Noble Pierce Sherwood, Professor of Bacteriology. 

Alberta Linton Corbin, Adviser of Women and Associate Professor of 

German. 
William Jacob Baumgartner, Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Clarence Cory Crawford, Associate Professor of European History. 
Victor Emanuel Helleberg, Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Margaret Lynn, Associate Professor of English Literature. 
Herman Camp Allen, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Ulysses Grant Mitchell, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Hubert Wilbur Nutt, Associate Professor of Education and Principal 

of Oread Training School. 
Joseph Granger Brandt, Associate Professor of Greek. 
Herbert Barker Hungerford, Associate Professor of Entomology. 
Ralph Emerson Carter, Associate Professor of Education. 
Ellis Bagley Stouffer, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
George Weatherworth Stratton, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Manuel Conrad Elmer, Associate Professor of Sociology. 
William McGlashan Duffus, Associate Professor of Economics. 
Alice Littlejohn Goetz, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
Florence Brown Sherbon, Associate Professor of Home Nursing. 
Herbert E. Jordan, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
William Rees B. Robertson, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Theodore Townsend Smith, Assistant Professor of Physics. 
Josephine May Burnham, Assistant Professor of English. 
William Lewis Eikenberry, Assistant Professor of the Teaching of 

Biological Sciences. 
Rose Ruth Morgan, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 
John Ise, Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Samuel Orrick Rice, Director of Publicity and Assistant Professor of 

Journalism. 
Dinsmore Alter, Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 
Clarence Estes, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
George Hermann Derry, Assistant Professor of Political Science. 
Lita Battey, Assistant Professor of the Teaching of English. 
Howard McKee Elsey, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Charles Eugene Johnson, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Arthur Jackson Mix, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 
Eugene Smith, Instructor in Anatomy. 
Alice Winston, Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Cora Irene Reynolds, Instructor in Voice. 
Hazel Helen Pratt, Instructor in Physical Education. 



Faculty. 351 

Emily Victoria Berger, Instructor in Chemistry. 

Gordon Lafayette Cram, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Jose Maria Osma, Instructor in Hispanic Languages and Literatures. 

Minerva C. Hall, Instructor in Public-school Music. 

John Ambrose Hess, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Alpha L. Owens, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Edward C. Perry, Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Margaret Husson, Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 

Bessie Douthitt, Assistant Instructor in Zoology. 



THE SUMMER SESSION 



PLAN AND PURPOSE. 

The Summer Session is administered in two separate terms, a six- 
weeks term and a four-weeks term, for either one of which a student may 
enroll without enrolling for the other. It is organized primarily to meet 
the needs of the following classes: 

1. Students who recognize the advantage of reducing their college at- 
tendance below the traditional four years, and their attendance at pro- 
fessional schools to as few years as may suffice to complete the course, 
in order that they may enter into their professional careers as early in 
life as possible. 

2. Persons engaged in business, such as salesmanship, banking, in- 
surance, office management, transportation and the like, who feel a need 
for systematic study of their problems. 

3. Teachers of all ranks who are anxious to improve their professional 
status. 

(353) 



23— K. U.— 5419. 



354 The Summer Session. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



RECREATION. 

The gymnasium and the campus give ample facilities for recreation. 
On account of its location the gymnasium is always cool and breezy. 
Such sports as tennis may be played under protection from the sun. 
The large floor is used for tennis, volley ball, and basket ball. The first 
floor is reserved for apparatus work and is always accessible, the men and 
women having separate gymnasiums. There are seven handball courts, 
which are available at all hours. Boxing, wrestling and fencing can be 
done in privacy in the rooms provided for these sports. Many new group 
games suitable for high schools have been developed in army camps, and 
will be taught to those interested. The shower baths are commodious, and 
can be regulated to suit the individual. The swimming pool is a most 
attractive feature of the gymnasium. It is 20 by 50 feet, lined with 
enameled brick, and well lighted, making it one of the pleasantest in the 
country. Swimming classes will be organized for women who cannot 
swim. 

The Kansas river affords a fine boating course, Potter Lake is con- 
venient for swimming, and McCook field furnishes excellent grounds for 
football, baseball, tennis, and track events. Nine excellent courts are 
available for tennis on McCook field, and five others near the gymnasium. 
In addition to these, the students at the Summer Session enjoy the folk 
dances and group games which require neither court nor apparatus. All 
of these facilities for recreation, except the indoor swimming for women, 
are free to students. 

LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS. 

(1) Frequent lectures upon subjects of general interest will be given 
by members; of the faculty and other educational leaders. 

(2) The School of Fine Arts will provide occasional musical and 
literary entertainments, including the work of the regular members of the 
faculty of the School of Fine Arts. Community singing will be a feature 
of some of these programs. 

(3) The Clifford Devereux Corporation of New York will present a 
series of three plays on the campus on July 11 and 12. 

THE SUMMER SESSION KANSAN. 

The Summer Session Kansan is a biweekly college newspaper, edited by 
the students in journalism. It contains all official and student organiza- 
tion announcements, campus news and notes, editorial comments, etc. 

ADVISER OF WOMEN. 

Miss Alberta Corbin, Adviser of Women at the University, will serve 
in that capacity during the Summer Session. The same safeguards that 
women students have during the regular year in connection with their 
social activities and rooming facilities will be available in the Summer 
Session. Rooming houses for girls will not be approved unless they have 
house mothers arranged for. 

Through the office of the Adviser of Women frequent opportunities for 
informal getting together, as well as more formal parties, will be pro- 
vided. Office hours will be maintained regularly for purposes of con- 
ference on matters which the women attending the Summer Session care 
to discuss. 



General Information. 355 

admission. 

The classes of the Summer Session are open to all who can satisfy the 
instructors that their preparation is sufficient to enable them to do the 
work properly; that is, a student may register in the Summer Session 
and attend its classes without meeting the requirements for admission 
which are in force during the regular session, and without paying the 
five-dollar matriculation fee which is required of all who enter a regular 
session for the first time. Record of credits will be kept on file but will 
not be applied toward any degree until the matriculation fee has been 
paid. 

DATES OF THE TWO TERMS. 

The first term of the Summer Session extends from Tuesday, June 
17, to Friday, July 25, inclusive. Classes will be held on Saturdays, 
June 21 and July 12, but on no other Saturdays. 

The second term extends from Monday, July 28, to Friday, August 22, 
inclusive. No Saturday classes will be held during the second term. 

REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT. 

Summer Session students are required to register and pay the Summer 
Session fee at the Registrar's office and then enroll for their courses in 
room 110, Fraser Hall. A large number of faculty members will be 
present at the time of enrollment to advise with students concerning their 
courses, and it will be necessary to have the enrollment card approved 
by one of these faculty advisers before it will be accepted. 

DATE OF ENROLLMENT AND LATE ENROLLMENT FEE. 

Enrollment for the first term of the Summer Session will take place 
on Tuesday, June 17. The entire day, from eight in the morning until 
five in the afternoon (except the hours occupied by the commencement 
exercises) will be devoted to that purpose, and enrollment at a later 
date will be considered as late enrollment and be subject to a fee 
of one dollar. Those who find it impossible to enroll on that day may 
apply for exemption from late enrollment fee to the Director, but exemp- 
tion will not be granted unless the case is a very meritorious one. Stu- 
dents entering late will not be allowed to enroll for the maximum number 
of hours credit without special permission from the Director. 

Enrollment for the second term will be held on Friday afternoon, 
July 25, for those who are in attendance during the first term. For 
those who come only for the second term, enrollment will be held on 
Monday afternoon, July 28, but such students should enter classes on 
Monday morning before they have enrolled. 

NATURE OF COURSES. 

The courses offered in the Summer Session are for the most part 
courses which are offered in the regular sessions, or modifications of 
such courses. Many of the courses have been selected with a view to 
meeting the wishes of teachers, and certain ones have been modified 
in some details for the same purpose. But such modifications are not so 
great as to make the courses unsuitable for students who do not intend 
to teach. 

Regular students of the University must be on their guard against 
duplicating work. Some of the Summer Session courses, while not ex- 
actly equivalent to regular courses, are so nearly equivalent to them 
that credit will not be given for both. Students who have had the regular 
course may not take for credit the Summer Session course of the same 
catalog number. Students who take the Summer Session course will bo 
barred in the future from the regular course. 



356 The Summer Session. 

amount of credit. 

The normal amount of credit to be obtained in the six-weeks session 
is live hours; the maximum is six hours. Under no circumstances will 
registration for more than six hours credit be permitted in this session. 
The amount of credit given for each course is indicated in the state- 
ment of that course. 

The maximum amount of credit to be obtained in the four-weeks 
session is four hours. Students who avail themselves of both sessions 
may thus receive a maximum of ten hours credit for their ten weeks' 
work — just one-third of a regular year's work. 

GRADUATE WORK. 

Graduates of the University of Kansas, or of other institutions of 
good rank, find in the Summer Session an opportunity to do graduate 
work which will lead to the master's degree. Thirty credit hours is the 
minimum requirement for this degree. A thesis is required as part of 
this work. The selection of all courses and of a subject for a thesis must 
be sanctioned in advance by the Dean of the Graduate School and the 
head of the department in which the applicant elects to do his major 
work. Therefore, students desiring graduate credit for summer work 
should register with the Dean of the Graduate School, as well as with 
the Director of the Summer Session. 

Since ten hours of work may be completed in one summer of ten weeks, 
it is now possible to secure the master's degree in three summer sessions. 

fees and expenses. 

The fee for Kansas students for the six-weeks term or for both terms 
together of the Summer Session, is ten dollars; for nonresidents, fifteen 
dollars. For the four-weeks term it is half the above. This fee covers 
admission to all courses except private lessons in music. For certain 
laboratory courses there is, in addition, the cost of materials. 

Lawrence is well provided with boarding houses and restaurants, and 
a sufficient number of these will continue in operation to supply all de- 
mands of the Summer Session. Good board, including room and service, 
may be had in private families at from $6 to $8 per week. The stewards 
of some of the existing student boarding clubs will remain on the ground 
and be prepared to carry on their organizations. 

A list of rooms and boarding places for men is kept on file in the 
Registrar's office, and for women in the office of the Adviser of Women. 
The number of students is so much less in summer than in the regular ses- 
sion that there is an abundance of rooms from which to choose. 



The Summer Session. 357 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 



The Summer Session courses offered by each department are num- 
bered to correspond with the numbers of the same courses in the general 
catalog. Courses numbered 1 to 49 are in general for students of 
freshman and sophomore rank. Courses 50 to 99 are for juniors and 
seniors, and, when so designated, for graduate students also. Courses 100 
and above are strictly graduate courses. 

ANATOMY. 

(See Medicine.) 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 13 or s 50. — Latin Composition. Two hours credit; as 13, in the 
College; as 50, in the College or the Graduate School. Open to all under- 
graduates who have had the course in De Senectute, and to all teachers 
of Latin. " Walker. 

s 60. — Cesar's Gallic Campaigns. Two hours credit in the College 
or the Graduate School. It cannot be taken by those who have never 
read Caesar, since the text is not translated in class. Walker. 

s 61. — Vergil's ^Eneid. Two hours credit in the College or the Grad- 
uate School. Walker. 

s85. — Greek Poetry in Translations. Two hours credit in the 
College or the Graduate School. Brandt. 

s 102. — Latin Epigraphy. Two hours credit in the Graduate School. 

Brandt. 
Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 63. — Latin Poetry in Translations. Two hours credit in the Col- 
lege or the Graduate School. Continues, but is not necessarily preceded 
by, the course in Greek Poetry in Translations. Brandt. 

s 64. — Cicero's Political Orations. Two hours credit in the College 
or the Graduate School. This is not intended as a reading course, and 
may not be taken by those who have never read the orations. Brandt. 

s 103. — Investigation in Epigraphy. Two or four hours credit in 
the Graduate School. Must be preceded by course 102 in the first term. 

Brandt. 

ASTRONOMY. 

(See Physics.) 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

First term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 50. — General Bacteriology. Five hours credit in the College or 
the Graduate School. A knowledge of elementary chemistry is a neces- 
sary prerequisite. Sherwood. 

s 60. — Bacteriological Journals. One hour credit in the College or 
the Graduate School. By appointment. Sherwood. 

s 61. — Special Problems in Bacteriology. Two to six hours credit 
in the College or the Graduate School. Sherwood. 



358 The Summer Session. 

biochemistry. 

(See Pharmacy.) 

BOTANY. 

First Term, June 17 tc July 25. 

s2. — The Living Plant. Botanical Foundations for Plant Culture, 
Domestic Economy and Civic Improvement. Three hours credit in the 
College. Stevens. 

s 3. — Plant Physiology. Three hours credit in the College. Mix. 

s 61. — Trees and Shrubs. Three hours credit in the College or the 
Graduate School. Stevens. 

s 62. — Elementary Plant Pathology. Three hours credit in the 
College or the Graduate School. Mix. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 1. — General Morphology of Plants. Four hours credit in the 
College. Wilson. 

s50. — Systematic Botany — Two hours credit in the College or the 
Graduate School. Wilson. 

CHEMISTRY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Elementary Chemistry. Five hours credit in the College. 
Open to undergraduates who have no credit for high-school chemistry. 

Stratton. 

s 2. — Inorganic Chemistry. Four, five or six hours credit. Elsey. 

s3. — Qualitative Analysis. Five hours credit in the College, School 
of Pharmacy, Mining or Chemical Engineering courses. Four hours 
credit in other engineering courses. This course must be preceded by 
course 2. . Berger. 

s 51. — Quantitative Analysis I. Two, three, or five hours credit in the 
College, School of Engineering, or School of Pharmacy. Allen. 

s 52. — Quantitative Analysis II. Two, three, or five hours credit. 
The conditions are the same as for course 51 except that this course must 
be preceded by course 51. Allen. 

s 52 C. — Gas Analysis. Two hours credit in the School of Engineering 
or the Graduate School. Allen. 

s 52 E. — Oil Analysis. Two hours credit in the School of Engineering 
or the Graduate School. Allen. 

s 61. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit in the 
College, School of Medicine, or School of Pharmacy, but not in the School 
of Engineering. Prerequisite, ten hours chemistry. Dains. 

s63. — Advanced Organic or (=163) Organic Preparations (Ad- 
vanced). Five hours credit in the College (63) ; five hours credit in the 
Graduate School (163). 8 to 12:30. Dains. 

s 71. — Physical Chemistry II. Five hours credit in the College, School 
of Engineering or Graduate School. Prerequisites, course 3, and satis- 
factory preparation in General. Physics and Calculus. Elsey. 

s 165. — Organic Chemistry (Research). Five hours credit in the 
Graduate School. Dains. 



Description of Courses. 359 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 51. — Quantitative Analysis. Four hours credit in the College or 
School of Engineering. Estes. 

s 52 D. — Food Analysis. Three hours credit in the College or Graduate 
School. Prerequisite, course 51. 8 to 12:30. Estes. 

s 52 G. — Chemistry of Milling and Baking. Two hours credit in the 
College or the Graduate School. Prerequisites, courses 51 and 61 or 62. 

Estes. 

DRAWING AND DESIGN. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Free-hand Drawing. Three hours credit in the College or School 
of Fine Arts. Hekking. 

s 95. — Teachers' Course in Free-hand Drawing and Design. Three 
hours credit in the School of Education. Hekking. 

ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Elements of Economics. Three hours credit in the College. 

Ise. 

s 10. — The Economics of the War. Three hours credit in the Col- 
lege. Boynton. 

s 51. — Banking. Two hours credit in the College or Graduate School. 

Boynton. 

s 70. — Labor Problems. Two hours credit in the College or Graduate 
School. Ise. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 4. — Comercial Geography. Two hours credit in the College. 

Duffus. 

s 60. — Life Insurance. Two hours credit in the College or Graduate 
School. Duffus. 

EDUCATION. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 51. — History of Modern Education. Three hours credit in the 
School of Education or the Graduate School. Olin. 

s 52. — Educational Measurements. Two hours credit in the School 
of Education or the Graduate School. Clark. 

s53. — Social Education. Two hours credit in the School of Educa- 
tion or the Graduate School. Carter. 

s62. — The Intermediate School (Junior High School). Two hours 
credit in the School of Education or in the Graduate School. Kent. 

s 63. — Education in America. Three hours credit in the School of 
Education or in the Graduate School. Olin. 

s 66. — Educational Statistics. Three hours credit in the School of 
Education or the Graduate School. Clark. 

s 71. — The Abnormal Child. Three hours credit in the School of Ed- 
ucation or the Graduate School. Schwegler. 

s 73. — City School Administration. Two hours credit in the School 
of Education or the Graduate School. Kent. 

s 74.— Educational Organization and Administration. Three hours 
credit in the School of Education or the Graduate School. Kelly. 



360 The Summer Session. 

s 75. — Psychology of High-school Subjects. Three hours credit in 
the School of Education or the Graduate School. Carter. 

s 76. — Extra-curricular Activities. Two hours credit in the School 
of Education or the Graduate School- Battey. 

s 78. — Adolescence. Three hours credit in the School of Education or 
the Graduate School. Schwegler. 

s 81. — Teachers' Course in Biological Sciences. Three hours credit 
in the School of Education and in the Graduate School. Eikenberry. 

s 86. — Teachers' Course in English. (See English). 

s 89. — Teachers' Course in Mathematics. (See Mathematics). 

s 95. — Teachers' Course in Drawing and Design. (See Drawing and 
Design) . 

s 97. — Teachers' Course in Physical Education. (See Physical Edu- 
cation). 

s 104. — Seminar in Educational Administration. Two to six hours 
credit in the Graduate School. Kelly, Kent. 

s 105. — Seminar in Science Teaching. Two hours credit in the 
Graduate School. Eikenberry. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 56. — Vocational Education. Two hours credit in the School of Edu- 
cation or the Graduate School. Johnson. 

s 57. — School Hygiene. Two hours credit in the School of Education 
or the Graduate School. Nutt. 

s 58. — The Curriculum. Two hours credit in the School of Education 
or the Graduate School. Wilson. 

s 61. — High-school Administration. Two hours credit in the School 
of Education or the Graduate School. Johnson. 

s 65. — Educational Methods. Two hours credit in the School of 
Education or the Graduate School. Wilson. 

s 84. — Teachers' Course in Normal Training. Two hours credit in 
the School of Education or the Graduate School. Nutt. 

ENGLISH. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Rhetoric and Composition. Threes hours credit in the College. 

Morgan. 

s 11. — English Literature. Three hours credit in the College. 

Burnham. 

sl2. — The History op English Literature. Three hours credit in 
the College. Winston. 

s 50. — Narration and Description. Three hours credit in the College 
or the Graduate School. O'Leary. 

s 72. — American Literature. Three hours credit in the College or the 
Graduate School. Hopkins. 

s 86. — Teachers' Course in English. Three hours credit in the School 
of Education or the Graduate School. Battey. 

s 89. — The English Essay. Two hours credit in the College or the 
Graduate School. O'Leary. 

s 114. — The History of the English Language. Three hours credit 
in the Graduate School. Burnham. 

s 124. — Seminar in English Teaching. Two to four hours credit in 
the Graduate School. Hopkins. 



Description of Courses. 361 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 10. — English Literature. Two hours credit in the College. 

Lynn. 

s 77. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Two hours 
credit in the College or the Graduate School. Dunlap. 

s 78. — Shakspere. Two hours credit in the College or the Graduate 
School. Dunlap. 

s 81. — Browning and Tennyson. Two hours credit in the College or 
the Graduate School. Lynn. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

The purpose of the department in offering courses in the Summer 
Session is to enable students to take advantage of the oportunity for 
biologic study of insect life not possible at other times of the year. The 
department therefore has offered for many years past a course in field 
entomology, which deals largely with the behavior and life histories of 
Uving insects. The work is conducted in part as an out-door study, and 
is not offered at other times of the year. All other courses are modified 
to take advantage of the most profitable time for the study of entomology. 

s 63. — Field Entomology. Three to five hours credit in the College. 

Hungerford. 
s 1 or s 50. — Introductory Entomology. Five hours credit in the Col- 
lege. • Hungerford. 
s 100. — Research. Hungerford. 

s 104. — Seminar. One hour credit in the Graduate School. 

Hungerford. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 64. — Economic Entomology. Four hours credit in the College. 

Johannsen. 
s 100. — Research. Four hours credit in the Graduate School. 

Johannsen. 

FRENCH. 

(See Romance Languages.) 

GERMAN. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 2 or s 3. — Intermediate German. Three hours credit in the College, 
School of Fine Arts or School of Engineering. Engel. 

s 57. — Storm and Stress. Three hours credit in the College or Grad- 
uate School. Engel. 

GREEK. 

(See Ancient Languages.) 

HISPANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s la or s 51a. — Elementary Spanish. Three hours credit in the 
College, School of Engineering or School of Fine Arts; or, if completed 
by VIII of the second term, five hours credit in the aforesaid, or one 
entrance unit. Owen. 

s 2a or s 52a. — Spanish Reading and Grammar. Credit the same as 
the foregoing. Osma. 



362 The Summer Session. 

s 4.— Spanish Composition. Two hours credit in the College, School 
of Engineering or School of Fine Arts. Owen. 

s 7.— Spanish Conversation. Three hours credit in the College. 

Osma. 

s 54.— Classic Spanish Drama. Two hours credit in the College or 
Graduate School. Osma. 

s 101.— Spanish Seminar. Two or three hours credit in the Graduate 
School. Owen. 

s 102. — Historical Spanish Grammar. Two hours credit in the 
Graduate School. Owen. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 16 or s 516. — Elementary Spanish, completed. Two hours credit. 

H us son. 
s 26 or s 526. — Spanish Reading and Grammar, completed. Two 
hours credit. Husson. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 3. — Modern England. Three hours credit in the College. 

Crawford. 

s 10. — American Government I. Three hours credit in the College. 

Derry. 

s 64. — Peace and Reconstruction. Three hours credit in the College 
and the Graduate School. 11 to 12:30. Hodder. 

s 71. — Reconstruction in American History. Two hours credit in 
the College and the Graduate School. Hodder. 

s 81. — Municipal Government. Three hours credit in the College and 
the Graduate School. Derry. 

s 84. — Greater European Governments. Three hours credit in the 
College and the Graduate School. Crawford. 

s 102. Seminar in American History. Three to six hours credit in 
the Graduate School. Hodder. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 60. — Europe Since 1870. Two hours credit in the College and the 
Graduate School. Hoskins. 

s 73. — The Rise and Expansion of the British Empire. Two hours 
credit in the College and the Graduate School. Hoskins. 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 6a. — Food and Nutrition. Three hours credit in the College. Open 
to all students. Daum. 

s 10. — Home Health and Home Nursing. Three hours credit in the 
College. Sherbon. 

s 65. — Public Aspects of the Household. Three hours credit in the 
College or the Graduate School. Daum. 

s 82. — Teachers' Course in Home Nursing. Three hours credit in the 
College. Sherbon. 



Description of Courses. 363 

journalism. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — The Newspaper. Three hours credit in the College. Rice. 

s 51. — Magazine Writing and the Short Story. Two hours credit 
in the College or in the Graduate School. Rice. 

s 53. — Interpretation of the News. Two hours credit in the Col- 
lege or in the Graduate School. Flint. 

s 56. — Psychology and Technique of Advertising. Two hours credit 
in the College or in the Graduate School. Flint. 

Note. — For the benefit of teachers of English or newspaper writing 
who have to deal with the problems of the high-school paper, a weekly 
round table, open to students in journalism courses, will be held. The 
round table will consider the methods of developing and utilizing the 
newspaper in the school — its value as an outlet for student production 
and as an interpreter of the school to the public — as treated in the jour- 
nalism department bulletin, "Newspaper Writing in High Schools." 

LATIN. 

(See Ancient Languages.) 

LAW. 

First term, June 17 to July 25. 

The courses in law in the Summer Session are designed to assist those 
who do not have the requisite credits in law to entitle them to enroll 
regularly in either the Middle or Senior classes of the School of Law, or 
who desire to shorten the actual time required to complete the three-year 
course of study. 

Any two of the following courses may be taken by the student upon 
satisfying the instructor of his preparation to undertake the work. It is 
intended, however, that those who wish to complete the course in the 
School of Law in three summer and two regular sessions shall study 
criminal law and torts in the first Summer Session, agency and insurance 
in the second Summer Session, and partnership and wills in the third 
Summer Session. During the regular sessions the student will pursue 
the course of study in the order stated in the General Catalog of the 
University for students enrolled in the Summer Session course. 

s 2. — Criminal Law. Burdick. 

s 4. — Agency. Green. 

s 5. — Torts. Green. 

s 13. — Insurance. Humble. 

s 27. — Partnership. Humble. 

s 29.— Wills. Burdick. 

MATHEMATICS. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 2. — College Algebra. Two hours credit in the College. Jordan. 

s 4. — Analytical Geometry I. Two hours credit in the College. 

Jordan. 

s 5. — Calculus I. Three hours credit in the College. Ashton. 

s 6. — Analytical Geometry II. Two hours credit in the College. 

Jordan. 

s 55. — Higher Algebra I. Three hours credit in the College or Grad- 
uate School. Mitchell. 



364 The Summer Session. 

s 58. — Advanced Analytic Geometry. Three hours credit in the Col- 
lege or the Graduate School. Ashton. 

s 89. — Teachers' Course in Mathematics. Three hours credit in the 
School of Education or the Graduate School. Mitchell. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 3. — Plane Trigonometry. Two hours credit in the College. 

Stouffer. 
s 9. — Theory of Equations. Two hours credit in the College. 

Stouffer. 

MEDICINE. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

Ten hours of collegiate biology are prerequisite for enrollment in the 
courses scheduled in anatomy. A fee of five dollars is charged for each 
of the courses 1, 2, 3, and 4; three dollars each for courses 7 and 9; two 
dollars for course 8. Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are scheduled provisionally, 
to be given provided the enrollment warrants it. 

s 1. — Dissection of the Arm and Thoracic Wall. Three hours 
credit. Smith. 

s 2. — Dissection of the Leg, Perineum and Abdominal Wall. Three 
hours credit. Smith. 

s 3. — Dissection of the Thoracic and Abdominal Viscera. Three 
hours credit. Smith. 

s 4. — Dissection of the Head and Neck. Three hours credit. 

Smith. 

s 5. — Human Osteology. One hour credit. Smith. 

s la. — Histology. Three hours credit. Lectures Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, at 8; laboratory, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 to 11, 
and Tuesday and Thursday, 8 to 11. Coghill. 

s 8. — Embryology and Embryogeny. Two hours credit. Lectures 
Tuesday at 8; laboratory Tuesday and Thursday, 9 to 12. Coghill. 

s 9. — Neurology. Three hours credit. Lectures Thursday at 8; 
laboratory Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 to 12. 

MUSIC. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

The Summer Session work in music will be under the direction of 
Associate Dean Preyer. The department offers courses in piano and 
organ under Associate Dean Preyer and Assistant Professor Greisinger; 
in voice under Professor Downing and Miss Reynolds; in violin under 
Professor Kendrie; in public-school music under Professor Downing and 
Miss Hall; in theory under Professors Kendrie and Preyer; in history of 
music under Professor Kendrie; in sight singing and ear training under 
Professor Downing and Miss Reynolds. 

Piano. The courses in piano are intended for three classes of stu- 
dents: for teachers who wish to improve their own playing, add tc their 
repertoire, and increase their knowledge of teaching methods; for stu- 
dents who wish to complete their preparation for the Fine Arts School, 
or for some particular year therein; especially for high-school students 
who are too busy to give much time to music during the year; and for 
those who study music as a source of general culture and to gratify per- 
sonal tastes. 

Voice. The course in voice is valuable for all who are interested in 
the art of singing, who wish to form correct habits of breathing and 
breath control, tone production, methods of teaching, etc. 



Description of Courses. 365 

This course furnishes opportunity for those who desire to enlarge their 
repertoire during the summer months. Special attention is given to be- 
ginning students. 

Violin. The courses in violin are for the benefit of teachers who wish 
to improve their methods; for students of violin, and for supervisors who 
wish to gain knowledge of school orchestras. 

Theory. Courses in harmony are offered. Students who enter the 
Freshman class in February may finish the year's work in the Summer 
Session and continue with the Sophomore class in the fall. There is also 
a beginning class. Classes meet five hours a week. 

Music Supervisors' Course. This course is for those who are pre- 
paring for public-school music supervision. It is also open to the pro- 
fessional music supervisor who wishes to review the work. There is a 
growing demand for teachers of public-school music who are competent 
to present the subject in a psychological manner. The course covers the 
work from the kindergarten to the high school, inclusive. The follow- 
ing are some of the subjects dealt with : Rote song, rhythm, ear training, 
sight singing, interval practice, care of the child voice in singing, chorus 
conducting, etc. 

The following subjects are for credit in the School of Fine Arts, ex- 
cept where otherwise indicated. All hours are by appointment. All 
students must register with the dean of the School of Fine Arts, as 
well as with the director of the Summer Session. 

Description of Courses. 

All classes meet daily. 

The following theoretical subjects may be taken without an additional 
fee: 

PUBLIC-SCHOOL MUSIC. 

s 1. — Teaching of Music in Grades 1, 2, 3, and 4. Two hours credit. 

Hall, 
s 2. — Teaching of Music in Grades 5, 6, 7, and 8. Two hours credit. 

Hall. 
s. 4. — Teaching of Music in High Schools. Two hours credit. 

Downing. 

SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

s 1. — Elementary Sight Singing and Ear Training. One hour 
credit. Hall. 

s 3. — Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. One hour 
credit. ■ Downing. 

MUSIC THEORY. 

s 1. — Harmony. Two hours credit in the College or in the School of 
Fine Arts. Kendrie. 

s 2. — Harmony. Two hours credit in the College or in the School of 
Fine Arts. Kendrie. 

s 3. — Harmony. Two hours credit in the College or School of Fine 
Arts. Preyer. 

history of music. 

s 50. — Appreciation of Music. Two hours credit in the College or 
in the School of Fine Arts. Kendrie. 

piano, voice, violin, organ. 

Courses in piano, voice, violin, and organ are offered by the Depart- 
ment of Music with the following credits in the School of Fine Arts. No 
credit will be allowed for less than two lessons and eight hours practice 
each week. 



366 The Summer Session. 

Piano. One hour credit for two lessons and eight hours practice each 
week. (Additional credit may be had for additional practice, by consult- 
ing Associate Dean Preyer.) 

Voice. One hour credit for two lessons and eight hours practice each 
week. 

Violin. One hour credit for two lessons and eight hours practice each 
week. (Additional credit may be had for additional practice, by consult- 
ing Professor Kendrie.) 

Organ. One hour credit for two lessons and eight hours practice each 
week. (Additional credit may be had for additional practice, by con- 
sulting Associate Dean Preyer.) 

tuition rates. 

Students paying the regular Summer Session fee may take any of the 
theoretical courses, taught in classes, for which they are prepared. 

Kansas students taking two lessons a week and paying not less than 
$12 in special fees, or nonresident students taking two lessons a week 
and paying not less than $18 in special fees, may take any of the theo- 
retical music subjects or any other regular courses offered in the Summer 
Session without paying the regular Summer Session fee. 

FEES FOR PRIVATE LESSONS FOR THE SIX-WEEKS TERM. 

Private lessons in piano with Professor Preyer: 

One half -hour lesson a week $12 . 00 

Two half-hour lessons a week 24 . 00 

Private lessons in organ with Professor Preyer: 

One half -hour lesson a week i $12 . 00 

Two half-hour lessons a week 24 . 00 

Private lessons in voice with Professor Downing: 

One half -hour lesson a week $12 . 00 

Two half -hour lessons a week 24.00 

Private lessons in violin with Professor Kendrie: 

One half -hour lesson a week $9.00 

Two half -hour lessons a week 18.00 

Private lessons in piano with Miss Greisinger: 

One half -hour lesson a week $6.00 

Two half -hour lessons a week 12 . 00 

Private lessons in voice with Miss Reynolds : 

One half -hour lesson a week $6 . 00 

Two half-hour lessons a week 12.00 

Organ practice at local churches, $2 to $3 a month for one hour daily. 

Pianos may be rented at private houses or at the music dealers. 

Special students in piano, voice or organ may be admitted to the Sum- 
mer Session by obtaining the permission of the Dean of the School of 
Fine Arts, and by paying the special fees stated above. 

RECITALS. 

The faculty of the School of Fine Arts will give a recital each week 
of the first-term session. The students in music will give fortnightly re- 
citals. 

"Community sings," conducted by Dean Butler and Professor Downing, 
will be features of the first-term session. 



Description of Courses. 367 

pharmacy. 

First term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 50. — Biological Chemistry. Three, four or six hours credit in the 
College, School of Medicine, School of Pharmacy, or the Graduate School. 
Lectures daily, 8 to 9:30. Laboratory work (by appointment) M. T. W. 
Th. F., mornings and afternoons. A survey of the field of biochemistry 
especially adapted to the needs of medical students, advanced students in 
the natural sciences and home economics. Students desiring to satisfy 
the medical school requirements must satisfactorily complete a minimum 
of 216 hours of laboratory and lecture-room work. Nelson. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s la. — General Psychology. Three hours credit in the College. Re- 
quired for admission to the School of Education. Elementary courses 
in biological and physical sciences are valuable antecedents. Hunter. 

s 56. — Instinct and Emotion. Two hours credit in the College or the 
Graduate School. Hunter. 

s 68. — Advanced Psychology I. Two to five hours credit in the Col- 
lege or the Graduate School. Hunter. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 11. — Introduction to Philosophy. Two hours credit in the College. 

Templin. 
s81. — Practical Ethics. Two hours credit in the College or in the 
Graduate School. Templin. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

The demand for high-school teachers who are prepared to fulfill the 
needs for physical training in secondary schools is growing stronger 
each year. Though the courses offered by this department are each 
complete, they are to be considered as presenting separate phases of 
the subject of Physical Education. Courses corresponding to labora- 
tory work are given in the gymnasium in connection with these courses. 

Principles of Coaching Track Athletics. No credit. Hamilton. 

Principles of Coaching Basketball. No credit. Hamilton. 

s 20. — Hygiene. One hour credit in the College. Goetz. 

s 52. — Kinesiology. Three hours credit in the College. Goetz. 

s56. — Principles of Physical Education. Two hours credit in the 
College. Goetz. 

s 57. — Principles of Recreative Sports and Games for Women. 
Two hours credit in the College. Pratt. 

s97. — Teachers' Course in Physical Education. Two hours credit 
in the School of Education. Hamilton, Pratt. 

Emergencies and First Aid to the Injured. Hours to be arranged. 

Goetz. 

Gymnasium and Field Classes in Connection with 56 and 57. 

Dancing. Folk dancing, elementary and advanced; esthetic dancing. 

Swimming. Instruction daily. A fee of one dollar will be charged. 

Daily Recreation Hour. For entire student body. Games and folk 
dances. 7. p. m. 



368 The Summer Session. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 3a. — General Physics. Mechanics, sound, and heat. Three hours 
credit in the College or the Engineering School. Offered in alternate 
years. (Not offered in 1919.) 

s 36. — General Physics. Light and electricity. Three hours credit in 
the College or the Engineering School. Offered in alternate years. 

Smith. 

s4a. — General Physics Laboratory I. Mechanics, sound, and heat. 
Two hours credit in the College or the Engineering School. This course 
must be preceded by or accompanied by 3a or its equivalent. Smith. 

s46. — General Physics Laboratory II. Light and electricity. Two 
hours credit in the College or the Engineering School. Smith. 

s 50. — Mechanics and Heat. Three hours credit in the College. Pre- 
requisites, a year's work in general physics and calculus. Alter. 

s 107. — Research and Thesis. Three to six hours credit in the Grad- 
uate School. Smith. 

s 10. — Descriptive Astronomy. Three hours credit in the College. 

Alter. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Elementary Physiology. Five hours credit in the College. 

Stoland and Assistant. 

s 70. — Advanced Physiology. Five hours credit in the College or 
Medical School. Stoland and Assistant. 

s 63 or s 100. — Special Problems, or Research in Physiology. Three 
to six hours credit in the College or the Graduate School. Stoland. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Oral Interpretation. Two hours credit in the College. 

MacMurray. 
s 50. — Extempore Speaking. Two hours credit in the College. 

MacMurray. 

s 60. — Dramatic Art I. Two hours credit in the College. 

MacMurray. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s la or s 51a. — Elementary French. Three hours credit in the Col- 
lege, School of Engineering, or School of Fine Arts; or an entrance unit if 
completed by s 16 or s 515 of the second term. Galloo. 

s 2a or s 52a. — French Reading and Grammar. Three hours credit 
in the College, School of Engineering, or School of Fine Arts; or an en- 
trance unit if completed by s 26 or s 526 of the second term. Pre- 
requisite, one semester of French. Hess. 

s 3. — Modern French Writers. Three hours credit in the College, 
School of Engineering, or School of Fine Arts. Prerequisite, two semes- 
ters of French. - Perry. 

s 4 and s 9. — French Composition and Conversation. One, two or 
three hours credit in the College, School of Engineering, or School of 
Fine Arts; three hours credit, 9:30 to 11; two hours credit, 9:30 to 
10:30, for students electing s4 only; one hour credit, 10:30 to 11, for 



Description of Courses. 369 

students electing s 9 (the conversation) only. Should be preceded or 
accompanied by s 3 or its equivalent. Perry. 

s6. — French Prose and Poetry. Three hours credit in the College. 
Should be preceded or accompanied by s 4 or its equivalent. Hess. 

s 59. — The Literary Movement of the Second Half of the Nine- 
teenth Century I. Three hours credit in the College or Graduate School. 

Galloo. 
Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 16 or s 516. — Elementary French, completed. Two hours credit 
in the College, School of Engineering, or School of Fine Arts, thus 
making with s la or s 51a a five-hour credit in French 1 or 51, or an 
entrance unit. ■ Owens. 

s 26 or s 526. — French Reading and Grammar, completed. Two 
hours credit in the College, School of Engineering, or School of Fine 
Arts, thus making with s 2a or s 52a a five-hour credit in French 2 or 52, 
or an entrance unit. Cram. 

s 7. — French Composition, Written and Oral. Two hours credit 
in the College. Owens. 

s9. — French Conversation. Two hours credit in the College. 

Cram. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 50. — Elements of Sociology. Two hours credit in College or 
Graduate School. Elmer. 

s55. — Psychological Sociology. Three hours credit in the College 
or the Graduate School. Helleberg. 

s 57. — Socialism. Two hours credit in the College or the Graduate 
School. Helleberg. 

s70. — Community Organization. Three hours credit in the College 
or Graduate School. Elmer. 

s 100. — Seminar of Sociology. Two to six hours credit in the Grad- 
uate School. Helleberg. 

s 101. — Seminar of Social Investigation. Two to six hours credit in 
the Graduate School. Elmer. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s52. — Social Pathology. Two hours credit in the College or Grad- 
uate School. 

s 53. — Remedial and Corrective Agencies. Two hours credit in the 
College or Graduate School. 

s 100. — Seminar of Sociology. Two to four hours credit in the Grad- 
uate School. 

SPANISH. 

(See Hispanic Languages and Literatures.) 

ZOOLOGY. 

First Term, June 17 to July 25. 

s 1. — Elementary Zoology. A study of animal life. Six hours credit 
in the College. Johnson. 

s 3. — Comparative Anatomy. Six hours credit in the College. 

Baumgartner. 

s 53. — Histological Technic. Three hours credit in the College or the 
Graduate School. Baumgartner. 

24— K. U.— 5419. 



370 The Summer Session. 

s 73. — Zoological Problems. Two to six hours credit in the College 
or Graduate School. Baumgartner, Johnson. 

s 74. — Biological Survey. Three to six hours credit in the College or 
Graduate School. Johnson. 

Second Term, July 28 to August 22. 

s 4. — Ornithology. Bird life of Kansas. Two hours credit in the Col- 
lege. Douthitt. 

s 60. — Animal Biology. Two hours credit in the College. Douthitt. , 

s 64. — Heredity in Relation to Eugenics. Two hours credit in the 
College or Graduate School. Robertson. 

s 72. — Genetics in Relation to Agriculture. Two hours credit in 
the College or Graduate School. Robertson. 

s 73. — Zoological Problems. Two hours credit in the College or Grad- 
uate School. Robertson. 



SECTION XI. 

The University Extension Division. 



(371) 



THE FACULTY. 



Frank Strong, Ph. D., Chancellor of the University. 
F. R. Hamilton, 1 Ph. M., Director of University Extension Division. 
H. G. Ingham, A. B., Acting Director of University Extension Division 
and Secretary of Correspondence-Study Department. 



Edgar H. S. Bailey, 1 Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

Lucius E. Sayer, Ph. M., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Frank W. Blackmar, Ph. D., Professor of Sociology. 

Charles G. Dunlap, Litt. D., Professor of English Literature. 

Edwin M. Hopkins, Ph. D., Professor of Rhetoric and English Language. 

Frank H. Hodder, Ph. M., Professor of American History and Political 
Science. 

Erasmus Haworth, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Arthur T. Walker, Ph. D., Professor of Ancient Languages and Litera- 
tures. 

William C. Stevens, M. S., Professor of Botany. 

Arvin S. Olin, A. M., LL. D., Professor of Education. 

Eugenie Galloo, A. M., Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. 

Ida H. Hyde, Ph. D., Professor of Physiology. 

William H. Johnson, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Samuel J. Hunter, A. M., Professor of Entomology. 

P. F. Walker, M. M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

L. D. Havenhill, Ph. M., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Frederick E. Kester, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

George C. Shaad, B. S., E. E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Samuel J. Crumbine, M. D., Professor of Preventative Medicine. 

Herbert A. Rice, C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Bennet M. Allen, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

Edmund H. Hollands, Ph. D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Goldwin Goldsmith, Ph. B., Professor of Architecture. 

William A. McKeever, Ph. M., Head of the Department of Child Wel- 
fare. 

Clement C. Williams, B. S., C. E., Professor of Railway Engineering. 

Elmer F. Engel, A. M., Professor of German 

William 0. Hamilton, A. B., Professor of Physical Education and 
Director of Athletics. 

Arthur MacMurray, A. B., M. 0., Professor of Public Speaking. 

Elizabeth C. Sprague, Professor of Home Economics. 

Raymond A. Schwegler, A. M., Professor of Education. 

Arthur J. Boynton, A. M., Professor of Economics. 

* Absent on leave. 

(373) 



374 University Extension Division. 

Charles H. Ashton, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Arthur C. Terrill, E. M., A. M., Professor of Mining and Ore Dressing. 
Harry C. Thurnau, Ph. D., Professor of Germanic Languages and 
Literatures. 

Frederick J. Kelly, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

Leon N. Flint, A. B., Professor of Journalism. 

Frederick H. Sibley, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Arthur L. Owen, A. M., Professor of Hispanic Languages. 

Miles W. Sterling, A. M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Hannah Oliver, A. M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Selden L. Whitcomb, A. M., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Martin E. Rice, M. S., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Alberta L. Corbin, Ph. D., Associate Professor of German. 

George J. Hood, B. S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Drawing. 

William J. Baumgartner, A. M., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Henry 0. Kruse, A. M., Associate Professor of German. 

Clarence C. Crawford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of European History. 

Victor E. Helleberg, LL. B., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Charles A. Haskins, B. S., Associate Professor of Sanitary Engineering. 

Margaret Lynn, A. M., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Henry C. Allen, A. M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

William C. McNown, B. S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Alfred H. Sluss, B. S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ralph E. Carter, A. M., Associate Professor of Education. 

Hubert W. Nutt, Ph. B., Associate Professor of Education. 

Joseph G. Brandt, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Ancient Language and 

Literature. 
Herbert B. Hungerford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 
Burton L. Wolfe, B. S., Associate Professor of Mining. 
Florence B. Sherbon, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of Home Health 

and Home Nursing. 
Alice Goetz, M. D., Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
Ellis B. Stouffer, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
William M. Duffus, A. M., Associate Professor of Economics. 
Francis E. Johnson, A. B., E. E., Associate Professor of Electrical 

Engineering. 
Raymond C. Moore, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Geology. 
Manuel C. Elmer, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Charles M. Sterling, A. B., Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy. 
Edwin F. Stimpson, B. S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
James E. Todd, A. M., Assistant Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 
Herbert E. Jordan, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
William R. B. Robertson, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Charles H. Talbot, A. B.,* Head of the Municipal Reference Bureau. 
Frank L. Brown, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanics. 
Harry A. Roberts, B. S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Grace M. Charles, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 
Jacob O. Jones, Ph. B., Assistant Professor of Hydraulics. 

*. Resigned February 1, 1919. 



Faculty. 375 

Josephine M. Burnham, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of English. 
Amida Stanton, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 
Richard L. Grider, E. M., Assistant Professor of Mining. 
John Ise, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Economics and Commerce. 
Helen M. Clarke, Ph. D., Assistant Professor in Correspondence Study. 
Maxwell Ferguson, A. M., LL. B., Assistant Professor of Economics and 

Commerce. 
Felipe Molina, B. L., Assistant Professor of Hispanic Languages. 
Herman B. Chubb, A. M., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 
Ward W. Sullivan, A. M., Assistant Professor of History in Extension 

Division. 
Albert A. Long, A. M., Head of the Municipal Reference Bureau. 
Nellie M. Stevenson, A. B., Instructor in Correspondence Study. 
Sara G. Laird, A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Carolyn B. Spangler, A. B., Instructor in German. 
Gordon La F. Cram, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Hazel K. Allen, Ph. B., Instructor in Home Economics. 
Hazel Pratt, A. B., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Sybil Woodruff, 1 A. B., Instructor in Home Economics. 
Elizabeth C. Meguiar, Instructor in Home Economics. 
W. A. Dill, A. B., Instructor in Journalism. 
Bessie Douthitt, Instructor in Zoology. 
Ethel Vaughn, A. B., Instructor in Correspondence Study. 
Agnes A. Murray, A. M., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Jose M. Albaladejo, A. B., Instructor in Hispanic Languages. 
Hearty Brown, A. M., Instructor in Rhetoric. 
Irene Scrutchfield, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Vera W. O'Keefe, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
J. Neale Carman, A. B., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Alva C. Ellisor, A. B., Instructor in Geology. 
Alpha L. Owens, A. M., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Eugenia W. Parker, A. B., Instructor in Correspondence-Study. 

1. Absent on leare. 



THE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION DIVISION 



The University Extension Division consists of four departments: 
Correspondence-Study, General Information, Municipal Reference, Child 
Welfare. 

Note. — Bulletins giving detailed information in regard to each of 
these departments will be sent on request. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CORRESPONDENCE-STUDY. 



PURPOSE. 



The purpose of the Department of Correspondence-Study is to assist 
those who have not been able to secure a higher education through the 
regular channels, either to inform themselves on some particular subject 
or to prepare for College work in residence. 

HISTORY. 

In 1891 University Extension had its beginning at the University of 
Kansas in courses of lectures, both informational and cultural, given at 
various points in the state by University professors. The idea of ex- 
tending the University's usefulness was further developed in 1903 by 
the opening of a Summer Session. The establishment, in 1909, of the 
Correspondence-Study Department of the University Extension Division 
was the final step in the effort to make the University serve in every way 
possible the educational needs of the state. 

GRADES OF WORK OFFERED. 

Most of the work offered is of university grade, but certain high-school 
courses are provided, and the number of vocational courses is being in- 
creased. 

THE SYSTEM. 

Procedure. The student who wishes to undertake correspondence study 
should first select such course or courses as he may desire to take, and 
should fill out the blank with all the information called for, returning it 
with the required fee to the office of the Extension Division. 

The Instruction. If the application is approved, the first lesson will 
be sent, with instructions for study and methods of preparation, and 
directions for returning lessson sheets and reports. Each lesson will 
be returned to the student, with such corrections, explanations, and sug- 
gestions as may be needed. Lists of books, assignments for reading, and 
all necessary assistance will be furnished throughout the course, so that 
no student will be left without adequate aid and guidance. Questions on 
the subject in hand are at all times encouraged. 

Each assignment contains questions to test the student's method of 
work as well as his understanding of the ground covered. After pre- 
paring for recitation the student writes his answers to the questions and 

(377) 



378 University Extension Division. 

returns them, together with a statement of any difficulties which may have 
arisen during his study. 

By Whom Prepared. These courses are prepared by the members of 
the University Faculty, and each represents a definite amount of work, 
corresponding to an equivalence of work done in residence at the Uni- 
versity or in the standardized schools of our educational system. 

The Unit Course. The unit course is divided, where practicable, into 
forty assignments, representing a five-hour course in residence. Such a 
course represents at least an amount of work equal to that done in resi- 
dence at the University in a study of five full recitation-hours per week 
for one semester or half year. It is assumed that this work may be done 
by the average student in forty weeks, with a minimum leisure for study 
of one hour per day, six days in the week. It is, however, the student's 
privilege to pursue his studies as rapidly as he is able. Shorter courses 
are ordinarily divided into fifths of the unit course of forty assignments, 
corresponding to three-hour, two-hour, or one-hour courses in resident 
work at the University. A three-hour course in residence, then, would be 
covered by correspondence teaching in twenty-four assignments, and 
shorter courses in proportion. Two assignments in correspondence ap- 
proximately cover the ground in quantity of a week's work in residence. 

Examinations. Examinations are optional with the student, but are 
required where credits are sought. These examinations must be taken 
either at the University or under conditions approved by the University. 
In the latter case, arrangements may often be made with the local super- 
intendent of schools to conduct the examination. 

General Regulations. 

1. Students may begin correspondence courses at any time during the 
year, but the Department cannot guarantee that all courses will be 
given during the summer months. 

2. For admission to the Correspondence-Study Department no pre- 
liminary examination is required. The student is required to fill out an 
application blank giving such information as may be helpful in adapting 
the instruction to the personal needs of each student. 

3. Students who undertake correspondence-study work for University 
credit must state this fact in advance and comply with all the require- 
ments of the University. 

4. For the benefit of the Department it is desired that the applicant 
state fully the purpose he has in view in taking the work, and also in 
detail such educational advantages, training or experience as he may 
have had. The Department endeavors to meet the needs of the individual 
student by advice and suggestions, as well as by formal instruction, but 
whenever it finds that the course elected is not for the best interests of 
the student, it reserves the right to reject the application, or to advise 
change or discontinuance. 

5. Correspondence students will be expected to complete a unit course 
within twelve months from the time of enrollment. 

6. During an instructor's vacation a substitute will be provided to 
carry on such course or courses, if possible, or the time for completing 
the course will be extended. 

7. No fee is refunded because of a student's inability to enter upon 
or pursue a course for which he has once registered. If an application 
for instruction is rejected the fee is returned. 

8. Each correspondence course is equivalent to the corresponding 
residence course and commands credit unless definite statement is made 
to the contrary. 

9. Not more than two courses may be carried through correspondence 
study at one time. Each subject listed under the various departments 
is a course; for example: first year English is one course, German I 
is one course. 



Department of Correspondence Study. 379 

10. All courses offered by the Correspondence-Study Department, 
whether taken for University credit or not, are on a uniform basis in 
reference to the amount of work covered. Courses which are satisfac- 
torily completed have, therefore, a definite value, and all students who 
successfully complete such courses will be awarded certificates of the 
grade in which the work is taken. 

11. Combinations of correspondence study and the residence work of 
the Summer Session are possible and recommended. 

UNIVERSITY CREDIT. 

1. Persons who seek a University degree must conform to all the 
requirements exacted by the college or school in which such degree is 
sought. A maximum of one-half the required credits for the A. B. 
degree may be accumulated through correspondence. The work of the 
earlier part of the course is more likely to be available for correspon- 
dence study. The last thirty hours must be taken in residence. 

2. University credit can be granted only to students who have met 
the entrance requirements of the University. Students enrolling for 
credit must meet the prerequisite conditions for each course. This regu- 
lation may be waived by the instructor for a student enrolling not for 
credit. Upon satisfactory completion of a correspondence course designed 
for credit, the student will be awarded a certificate of credit in the Uni- 
versity. Other students' grades will be recorded merely in the files of the 
Department and certificates issued for the same. 

3. Upon completion of all the assignments of any correspondence- 
study course for University credit the student shall pass an examina- 
tion held under the direction of the instructor giving such course, or by 
some one designated by the University for that purpose. 

4. Work taken for credit may not be done by any student while in at- 
tendance at any institute of learning. 

5. Admission credit is given for courses covering college entrance re- 
quirements which are satisfactorily completed and passed by examination. 

6. University credit is given for courses of college grade satisfactorily 
completed and passed by examination. 

7. If the student has a record of residence work in the University, 
credits gained from correspondence courses are immediately transferred 
to that record; if not, they are held in the Correspondence-Study De- 
partment until the student secures such a. record covering one year of 
study in residence. 

Special Engineering Regulations. 

1. Not more than one-fourth of the number of unit hours of credit 
required for graduation in any engineering department may be obtained 
through correspondence study. 

2. Not more than seven hours of credit in sequence in courses which 
are interdependent may be obtained through correspondence. 

3. A failure in any branch in residence may not be made up through 
correspondence. 

STUDY CLUBS. 

It may sometimes happen that women's clubs, business men's clubs, 
debating clubs, Y. M. C. A. classes, or any of the numerous organizations 
of men and women for mutual help, encouragement, and stimulation, may 
wish to pursue correspondence study as a class or study group. In such 
instances the individual members can enroll in the same courses, working 
out their lesson assignments and sending them in regularly. Then the 
club or study group can meet once a week or oftener for the discussion of 
difficult points and for cooperative study. The advantages of such a plan 
are very great, since the stimulus of companionship and mutual help goes 



380 University Extension Division. 

far to overcome the tendency to discouragement, lethargy, and failure 
encountered in solitary study. Such cooperative study also makes pos- 
sible occasional personal visits and class instruction from University 
professors, in addition to correspondence instruction. This manner of 
procedure is recommended for labor unions, professional associations of 
all sorts, and church brotherhoods. 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION CLASSES. • 

Where a group of fifteen or more students make application, arrange- 
ments will be made, when possible, for the organization of an extension 
class to meet for a two-hour period, under the direction of a member of 
the University faculty. Classes conducted for a term of fifteen weeks 
provide two hours University credit; classes arranged for a longer term 
provide proportionately greater credit. Where local conditions demand, 
the fifteen meetings may be so arranged as to cover a longer or shorter 
period of time, the total number of recitation hours and credit remaining 
the same. 

The tuition for each student enrolling for any one class is $5 for a two- 
hour course; for classes providing more credit, the tuition is proportion- 
ately higher. 

For a fee of $15 per year the student may enroll for as many classes 
as may be available, no more than two classes, however, to be pursued 
at the same time. 

The Extension Division cannot guarantee to supply all demands of 
this nature, but will do so as far as the time of the instructors and the 
facilities permit. 

EXPENSES. 

Fees. The cost of correspondence instruction for residents of Kansas 
is an incidental fee of $10 a year, or $15 for nonresidents. For this 
amount the student is entitled to tuition for a calendar year, and during 
that period he may carry two courses at a time, a course being each 
separately numbered and listed branch in this bulletin. The incidental 
fee must be paid each year that the student reenrolls for study. If a 
correspondence student should later come into residence at the University 
he would then be required to pay the $5 matriculation fee. 

Laboratory and Shop Fees. Students are required to pay the actual 
cost of material of all kinds used in laboratories and shops. In some 
departments a definite fee to cover cost of materials in a given course 
is fixed prior to the opening of each term. Such fees are payable at the 
office of the chief clerk at the time of enrollment and before beginning 
the student secures, at cost, material and apparatus as needed. 

Books and Outfit. All necessary textbooks, drawing outfits, appa- 
ratus, dissecting material, chemicals, etc., are extra, and must be pro- 
cured by the student. The student also pays postage on lessons one way. 

Payments. The incidental fee may be paid in monthly installments of 
five dollars when the student finds it necessary. In this plan the general 
rule of payment in advance applies. No extra charge is exacted for a 
course where payments are made by installments. But in every case at 
least five dollars of the required fees must accompany the application. 

How to Remit. Money should be sent in the form of postal or express 
money order, or Kansas City or Chicago draft, made payable to the 
University of Kansas. Mail to the University Extension Division,' Law- 
rence, Kan. 

The Cost Analyzed. No effort is made to put the fees of the Corre- 
spondence-Study Department or of the University Extension Division 
on a money-making basis. The effort is rather to put the fees upon the 
lowest operating basis. In fact, the fees for the whole University and 
for every department and division thereof have been fixed by legislative 



Department of Correspondence Study. 381 

enactment, and are not subject to change or modification by the Uni- 
versity authorities. The fees for the Correspondence-Study Department 
are therefore practically the same as those exacted from students in 
residence. The motive is public service. 

Traveling Libraries. In some of the courses offered through corre- 
spondence the collection of books of reference for collateral and supple- 
mentary reading required is so extensive that it would be a hardship on 
many persons to be compelled to buy them, and yet they are books used 
for regular reference in the University library by students taking the 
same courses in residence, and are essential for a proper grasp of the 
subject matter. To obviate this difficulty, an arrangement has been made 
with the State Traveling Libraries Commission at Topeka to furnish 
these reference books in loan libraries of five to twelve volumes, a 
separate library for each of such courses. A library covering the work 
of a certain course may thus be obtained and used by the student under 
the following conditions : 

First. That a fee of one dollar be charged and express both ways. 

Second. That the books may be kept six months. 

Third. That the student retaining books over six months shall pay 
an extension fee of twenty-five cents per month. 

The courses which need traveling libraries may be learned on applica- 
tion. 



382 University Extension Division. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



ASTRONOMY. 

1. — Descriptive Astronomy. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College credit. 

BOTANY. 

1. — Elementary Botany. Forty assignments, five hours College 
credit. 

2. — General Morphology of Plants. Forty assignments, five hours 
College credit. 

3. — Plant Histology. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

CHEMISTRY. 

1. — Elementary Chemistry. Forty assignments, five hours College 
credit. 

2. — Sanitary and Applied Chemistry. Forty assignments, five hours 
College or Engineering credit. 

3. — Quantitative Analysis. Forty assignments, five hours College 
or Engineering credit. 

4. — A Special Course in Chemical Water Analysis. Part I, forty 
assignments, five hours College credit. Part II, twenty assignments, two 
and one-half hours College credit. 

5. — Qualitative Analysis. Forty assignments, five hours College or 
Engineering credit. 

6. — Chemistry of Food Products. Forty assignments, five hours 
College credit. 

ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE. 

1. — Elements of Economics. Forty assignments, five hours College 
credit. 

2. — Banking. Twenty-four assignments, three hours College credit. 

3. — Labor Problems. Twenty-four assignments, three hours College 
credit. 

4. — Life Insurance. Sixteen assignments, two hours College credit. 

5. — Commercial Geography. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College credit. 

EDUCATION. 

1. — History of Ancient and Mediaeval Education. Twenty-four as- 
signments, three hours College or Education credit. 

2. — History of Modern Education. Twenty-four assignments, three 
hours College or Education credit. 

3. — Principles of Education. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College or Education credit. 

4. — Educational Organization and Administration. Twenty-four 
assignments, three hours College or Education credit. 

5. — School Hygiene. Twenty-four assignments, three hours College 
or Education credit. 

6. — Educational Psychology. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College or Education credit. 



Courses of Instruction. 383 

7. — School Management. Twenty-four assignments, no credit. 

8. — Methods of Teaching. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College or Education credit. 

9. — High School Administration. Twenty-four assignments, three 
hours College or Education credit. 

10. — Elementary Education. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College or Education credit. 

ENGINEERING. 

1. — Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing. Twenty-four assignments, 
three hours Engineering credit. 

2. — Machine Drawing. Twenty-four assignments, three hours Engi- 
neering credit. 

3. — Elementary Mechanics. Not for credit. Sixteen assignments. 

4. — Mechanism and Machine Design. Not for University credit. 
Twenty assignments. 

5. — Highway Engineering. Sixteen assignments, two hours Engi- 
neering credit. 

6. — Engines and Boilers. Twenty-four assignments, three hours En- 
gineering credit. 

12. — Coal Mining. Credit may be given to students having sufficient 
preparation. Forty assignments, five hours Engineering credit. 

For additional mining courses, see announcement of courses 50 to 60. 

*14. — Elementary Minerology. Forty assignments, five hours Col- 
lege or Engineering credit. 

*15. — General Geology. Forty assignments, five hours College or 
Engineering credit. 

19. — Reinforced Concrete. May be taken only by students of ad- 
vanced standing and graduate engineers. Twenty-four assignments, 
three hours Engineering credit. 

20. — Architectural Drawing. Three hours Engineering credit will 
be given, provided the work of five assignments is done at the Univer- 
sity under personal instruction. Part I, twenty assignments; part II, 
twenty assignments. 

23. — Works Management. May be taken for engineering credit by 
students who have done a sufficient amount of work to give them standing 
with the Junior class. Sixteen assignments, two hours Engineering 
credit. 

24. — Plane Surveying. When accompanied by field work of a satis- 
factory nature Engineering credit will be given. Forty assignments, five 
hours Engineering credit. 

25. — Railway Surveying. Forty assignments, five hours Engineering 
credit. 

25a. — Railway Drawing. Twenty-four assignments, one hour Engi- 
neering credit. 

26. — Hydraulics. Twenty-four assignments, three hours Engineering 
credit. 

Vocational Courses. 

(University credit is not given.) 

1. — Shop Mathematics. Forty assignments. 

2. — Drawing. Twenty-four assignments. 

3. — Machine Drawing. Twenty-four assignments. 

4. — Architectural Drawing. Twenty assignments. 

* See, also, courses 1 and 2 under Mineralogy and Geology. 



384 University Extension Division. 

10. — Elements of Chemistry. Ten assignments. 

11. — Materials of Machine Construction. Ten assignments. 

17. — The Elements of Telephony. Twenty-four assignments. 

20. — Steam Engineering. Twelve assignments. 

21. — Gas, Gasoline, and Oil Engines. Ten assignments. 

29. — Direct Current Electricity. Twenty assignments. 

30. — Alternating Current Electricity. Twenty assignments. 

31. — Switchboard and Controlling Devices. Ten assignments. 

32. — Elements of Illumination. Twenty assignments. 

50. — Mine Surveying or Mine Engineering. Forty assignments. 

51. — Mine Accidents: Causes and Prevention. Fifteen assign- 
ments. 

52. — General Mining. Twenty assignments. 

53. — Ore Dressings: Concentration of Ores. Twenty assignments. 

54. — Explosives. Ten assignments. 

55. — Ventilation of Mines. Ten assignments. 

56. — Coal Mining. Twenty assignments. 

56X. — Combined Course for Inspectors and Mine Foremen. Forty 
assignments. 

58. — Origin and Occurrence of Salt. Ten assignments. 

*60. — First Aid and Rescue Work. 

ENGLISH. 

1. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Forty assignments, five 
hours College or Engineering credit. 

2. — Narration and Description. Forty assignments, five hours Col- 
lege credit. 

3 # — English Literature. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

4. — History of English Literature. Forty assignments, five hours 
College credit. 

5. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Forty as- 
signments, five hours College credit. 

7. — American Literature. Twenty-four assignments, three hours 
College credit. 

8. — Victorian Literature. Forty assignments, five hours College 
credit. 

9. — History of the English Drama, Twenty-four assignments, three 
hours College credit. 

10. — Browning. Twenty-four assignments, three hours College credit. 

11. — Modern English Grammar. Sixteen assignments, two hours 
College credit. 

12. — Elizabethan Drama (Exclusive of Shakspere). Twenty-four 
assignments, three hours College credit. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

1. — Introductory Entomology. Forty assignments, five hours Col- 
lege credit. 

2. — Systematic Entomology. Sixteen assignments, two hours Col- 
lege credit. 

* Since this work will be carried out in cooperation with the federal bureau officials, it 
will be necessary to conform to the schedules of the car, and the instruction will be given 
by special arrangement instead of by the regular method of fixed assignments. 



Courses of Instruction. 385 

3. — Applied Entomology. Sixteen assignments, two hours College 
credit. 

4. — The Role of Insects in the Spread of Disease. Not for Uni- 
versity credit. Sixteen assignments. 

GERMAN. 

1. — German I. Forty assignments, five hours College or Engineering 
credit. 

2. — German II. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

3. — German III. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

4. — German IV. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

5. — Wallenstein. Twenty-four assignments, three hours College 
credit. 

6. — German Composition. Sixteen assignments, two hours College 
credit. 

7. — Goethe's Faust (Parts I and II). Twenty-four assignments, three 
hours College credit. 

8. — The Classic Drama. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

9. — (German 8 and 9.) Schiller's Brant von Messina. Sixteen 
assignments, two hours College credit. 

10. — Iphigenie AND Nathan DER Weise. Twenty-four assignments, 
three hours College credit. 

GREEK. 

1. — Elementary Greek. Forty assignments, five hours College credit. 

2. — Xenophon's Anabasis. Forty assignments, five hours College 
credit. 

3. — Homer's Iliad. Twenty-four assignments, three hours College 
credit. 

HIGH-SCHOOL BRANCHES. 

The high-school work now offered is as follows : 

ENGLISH: 

First year (40 assignments) one unit. 

Second year (40 assignments) one unit. 

Third year (40 assignments) one unit. 

Fourth year (40 assignments) one unit. 

American Literature (20 assignments) one-half unit. 

English Grammar (20 assignments) no credit. 

LATIN : 

Beginning (40 assignments) one unit. 

Cgesar (40 assignments) one unit. 

Cicero's Orations (40 assignments) one unit. 

Vergil (40 assignments) one unit. 

MATHEMATICS: 

Elementary Algebra, Part A (40 assignments) one unit. 

Elementary Algebra, Part B (20 assignments) one-half unit. 

Plane Geometry (40 assignments) one unit. 

Solid Geometry (20 assignments) one-half unit. 

Plane Trigonometry (20 assignments) one-half unit. 

GERMAN : 

First year (40 assignments) one unit. 

Second year (40 assignments